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jcrans20

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About jcrans20

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    MCSaranRap
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    http://www.visualcreatures.com
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    Hollywood, CA
  1. Thanks in advance for any advice. I'm banging my head against a wall! I need to create a guitar out of guitar picks. I modeled a pick, and used a cloner in object mode, then set the object as a modeled body of a guitar. I did the same for the neck, head, pick ups and knobs. I am pretty happy with the results. The problem is, each cloner in the scene needs a dynamics tag to keep the picks from going through each other, and some of the cloners have a pretty high clone count since I don't want there to be very many gaps in the guitar. Baking the dynamics is way too time consuming, and the project is so slow it's essentially unworkable. I'm running a fast 8-core MacPro. I've spent a good part of today staring at the spinning beach ball. My question is, does anyone have any ideas for optimizing this process? I will need to create a lot of different shapes in the same way, so I can't really do this by hand. I also want to be able to use dynamics and effectors on the picks. Other than that, I'm open to suggestions! Here is a link to the scene file if that helps: http://tinyurl.com/6qnusdq
  2. Awesome, thanks for all your suggestions! I had started taking a crack at hand animating it that evening, but wasn't getting anything natural. I think baking the dynamics to the timeline is the way to go, and I've been wanting to learn how to do that anyways. Cheers.
  3. Is there a way to control where an object using dynamics lands? I can't upload my project files just yet because it's a sensitive project that is still in production. I'm animating a logo that has a ball incorporated in it. I've got the camera starting behind the logo in 3D and pulling back, through the logo to reveal it. As this happens, the ball that is part of the logo bounces in, takes about 3 bounces and lands perfectly in the logo. Right now what I'm doing animating in reverse. I add dynamics to the ball, start the ball in the correct placement, then give it a custom initial velocity so it flies off the logo and bounces away. When I render the scene and reverse it, the ball bounces in and lands in the right spot. It looks pretty good, but it bugs me that because I'm doing it in reverse some parts don't make sense. For example, when the ball takes it's last bounce and starts making it's way to the final resting spot, it is no longer spinning because in the correct play back it has yet to hit the floor. In a nutshell, am I literally doing this in a backwards way and is there a way to control where your dynamic objects wind up? Thanks!!
  4. Is there a way to control where an object using dynamics lands? I can't upload my project files just yet because it's a sensitive project that is still in production. I'm animating a logo that has a ball incorporated in it. I've got the camera starting behind the logo in 3D and pulling back, through the logo to reveal it. As this happens, the ball that is part of the logo bounces in, takes about 3 bounces and lands perfectly in the logo. Right now what I'm doing animating in reverse. I add dynamics to the ball, start the ball in the correct placement, then give it a custom initial velocity so it flies off the logo and bounces away. When I render the scene and reverse it, the ball bounces in and lands in the right spot. It looks pretty good, but it bugs me that because I'm doing it in reverse some parts don't make sense. For example, when the ball takes it's last bounce and starts making it's way to the final resting spot, it is no longer spinning because in the correct play back it has yet to hit the floor. In a nutshell, am I literally doing this in a backwards way and is there a way to control where your dynamic objects wind up? Thanks!!
  5. Does anyone remember a couple years back, this graphic design studio released their "cg reel", and it was just the two of them in front of the camera making ridiculous sound effects and hand motions? I've googled just about every combination of words but haven't found anything.
  6. I had a question relating to this topic, and I couldn't find the answer anywhere else. Say company X has you on first hold, and company Y has a second hold. Company X wants to book and so does company Y, but X is only willing to pay $100 under your day rate, while Y is willing to pay your full day rate. Can you turn down X and go to Y stating financial reasons, or are you stuck with company X even if they offer you a crap day rate?
  7. Totally agree with that statement. I'd never use this method to dump a faulty project on someone. I'd either start working with someone from the beginning, or if I ran into trouble mid-project, I'd provide them with an organized project that would be easy to jump into. There's nothing worse than taking over a project that is just 500 layers of "comp 5, layer 3432, black solid 15, oh and this layer only works if you pre-comp the pre-comp, turn your monitor upside down and put 500x motion blur on it".
  8. Kind of a weird concept, but it seems to make sense. I consider myself more on the design spectrum than animation, however I frequently both design and animate my design boards for clients using AE and C4D. Recently I had this project that had a nice design, but technically proved quite difficult. I ended up digging myself into holes, hitting dead ends and wasting a lot of time and money because I didn't feel honest billing the clients for the time I spent figuring stuff out. It seems like it would be mutually beneficial to find someone that is a technical whiz with animation programs, that would be willing to work on an hourly or percentage basis as an animation consultant. Sometimes the problem can be solved with awesome forums like this, or Googling tutorials...but other times there's not a tutorial to be found, zero help from the boards and a still looming deadline. So, I guess my question is: has anyone ever had a relationship with a tech guru type person that could open up your scene files and help you out and share some of the budget with? I know this is basically a dumbed down designer/animator relationship, but sometimes you don't need someone to animate the WHOLE thing. You just need someone willing to de-kink your technical issues for a couple hundo.
  9. jcrans20

    nicholas rocco

    Hey dude, congrats on graduating! I graduated from SCAD in '07. I think your reel is looking nice. You've got a nice style going. 2 thoughts right off the bat are: -Make sure you prepare your QT for internet streaming, because right now the whole QT is loading before it plays, which took me almost 10 minutes on a fast connection. I don't know many creative directors that will wait that long. Here's a link on how to do that -Maybe speed up your edit a little bit. Right now I feel like a couple of the shots are really long, and could be cut up and moved around.
  10. No prob. As far as boards go, I'd say do whatever works for you so long as you can show your process, and have an idea of what you are animating before you start. Whether that's a 10 frame storyboard, or a couple random style frames and/or a collection of inspirational thumbs. I totally agree that sometimes you come up with some great stuff by just messing around, but I'd still consider that part of your "boards" process. Do some experimenting with AE animations, render out some tests, drop some stills of the animation into your boards even. It's just great to see a certain degree of process and planning, and it also makes the animation go a lot smoother if you already know that it's going to go from point A, to B, to C. Plus, unless a client really trusts you, they are going to want to see what you are going to be spending all your billable hours animating before you start.
  11. I see. I was just wondering because I had that issue when rendering projects from AE7 on an intel machine before I got CS4. Does the problem work in reverse, if you're using CS4 on a non-intel?
  12. I went to The Savannah College or Art and Design. We did a lot of type driven projects, where we were either given the audio or got to choose our own. Unfortunately, while these were great learning exercises, there are TONS of those projects on peoples reels. But if that sounds fun to you, I say go for it. I think one of the most helpful projects I did there was in a Packaging for Broadcast class. We picked networks out of a hat, and then had to create a network package from the ground up. Lower thirds, bumpers, bugs, mortises, etc. We had to start by making a style guide, laying out all of our elements and designs in a book before starting animation. Other than that, I'd say do pieces that inspire you since you don't have to be tied down by a client. Your true talent will shine when you are enjoying the project. Avoid tutorials that everybody uses, like Video Copilot. While these are very helpful in becoming more refined with the program, they are in a ton of reels. Also, even if it's for your own personal project, do boards. I wish that I was made to do boards more in college before jumping into animation. Hope that helps!
  13. What version of AE are you running?
  14. Ha, yeah I actually have an interview with Creative Circle tomorrow
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