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jonkman

3D Animation vs Video Editing

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I'm looking into different certificate programs for motion graphics and have on several occasions come across programs that seem to overlap in terms of motion graphics content. More specifically I often see separate 3D Computer Animation and Digital Video programs in the same school.

 

I'm from Washington DC and I am looking at the Corcoran's certificate programs and was hoping someone could shed some light on the major distinctions between 3D Animation and Digital Video because both seem to have motion graphic course requirements and I don't think you can disregard 3D Animation in the field of motion graphics and at the same time you can't disregard video editing as a great asset in the field as well.

 

Here are links to the specific certificate programs i'm looking at:

3D Animation: http://www.corcoran.edu/continuing/certifi...rtificate_ID=13

Digital Video: http://www.corcoran.edu/continuing/certifi...ertificate_ID=5

 

Thanks.

Edited by jonkman

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video editing can be two things:

 

1. button pushing, where some insufferable douchebag looks over your shoulder and tells you what to do (you are a proxy for the software)

 

2. storytelling. this kind of editing is more like creative writing than anything else and has absolutely nothing to do with design or animation, except that the software has a somewhat similar interface.

 

the ironic part is that most people who are interested in becoming editors are morons with no storytelling ability whatsoever, and in the rare event that an editor DOES have storytelling, they're relegated to being a button pusher.

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Here's some advise:

 

I you want to do something else in the long run, learn to edit. If you want to become a button monkey, learn 3D. (except in the case that you rock)

I take offense. ;)

Perhaps you could explain how 3D forces you to be a button monkey? At least any more than an editor?

Because there are more buttons? I don't buy it.

 

Here's my advice... nobody will hire you because you are "certified" so don't worry about it. Pick the one you think you'll enjoy "doing" the most. If you want to make a lot of money go work in sales, law, or politics where the *point* of the work is to make a lot of money.

 

-m

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As an editor / motion graphics guy who also does some 3D (I live in Boston, you gotta diversify,) I can give you some insight. As an editor, you generally are NOT a "button-pusher" unless you are working on a $2 million dollar commercial with a crazy creative director. You are often given a lot of creative license in terms of the music you use and the way you piece things together. When I do graphics of any sort, including 3D, I'm often using story boards and concept art as a reference, so I have much less creative input. I do, however, love the technical side of creating graphics and 3D, so I don't mind just pushing the buttons every once in a while.

 

I would say, don't focus solely on 3D unless you are VERY technically inclined because once you get past the basics of modeling / animating it gets insanely complicated and can easily consume your life. Editing is much easier to get the hang of, and will be easier to find work in.

 

joey

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Both of them require to be creative(uless you gonna work for c-span)...one is more thecnical....and the other is intuitive.....I`m gonna make analogy with a car.Buy a Yaris and you`ll be able to put a few decals and an ipod to the tunning...buy a vdub,,,and you can increase the horse power up to 500....if you do a lot of work,and invest time and money>Button pusher ---depends where you end up and how good do you duck :D

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after been doing video editing for 5 years i decide that i want to do visual fx and motion graphics, i'm from Angola and came to vancouver to study motion graphics.The program is pretty cool, it doesn't focus only on softwares but the creative process, project management, art and creative direction and so on! we have theory and lots of practice. it's only one year and very intensive. here is the link www.vfs.com.

 

sorry about my bad english :-)

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the ironic part is that most people who are interested in becoming editors are morons with no storytelling ability whatsoever, and in the rare event that an editor DOES have storytelling, they're relegated to being a button pusher.

 

Jesus. That's one of the most accurate things I've ever heard, sad to say. Not in EVERY case of course, but it's a very safe generalization.

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As J korenman stated (and i too am a motion graphics/editor kinda person with some 3d skill), 3D is often done by the more technically inclined, and as a result, you are often placed in a position that doesn't offer much creative freedom. Coupled to the fact that in motion graphics, 3D is more often then not an extra, it makes for a very isolated position in this racket.

Of course, this all might not be true if you're rock 'n' roll.

Oh, and sermon is right. Editors have the most tacky taste i've seen. (at least in television)

 

You better diversify.

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Agree and disagree. I've seen lot of gifted, creative artists taking editing courses. You don't see them in the workplace because they can't survive the dog eat dog politics. The hacks come out on top because they have knife in the back skills and because they understand how producers love to be entertained.

 

Jesus. That's one of the most accurate things I've ever heard, sad to say. Not in EVERY case of course, but it's a very safe generalization.

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In terms of the programs themselves editing is far quicker to pick up - there's only so many ways you can join two clips together, crossfade and so on so the application itself won't take long to master. As sermon pointed out though, the next part is learning to tell a story which can take a lifetime - I know plenty of editors doing it for 15 years who still don't know if they're any good or not. By the decisions you take, you can completely change how the audience relates to the characters, the undertones, hell you can reorder everything and make a totally different story - a friend of mine who used to be a vfx guy moved into directing which is his ultimate aim and he shot a short film two years back. He wasn't happen with one of the actors and was amazed at how much he could get around it in the edit. That's a totally different skill from operating an editing program though.

 

As regards 3d you can become a button pusher as parallax mentioned but if you're any good then you can create absolutely anything you want - your only limitations are your own talent and the amount of time you have to make stuff. Personally I'm a heavy vfx and 3d guy so I wouldn't be a dedicated motion graphics guy per say but in my area I get to make stuff that isn't possible any other way which is quite cool - It could be something subtle like a set extension or a quick fix for a compositor or it could be a features character or effect. There's tonnes of stuff to push yourself with and that's way beyond being a button pusher. Two things are a hazard though. Firstly you're dealing with an area that anythings possible in and directors / producers generally don't understand it. It can get pretty frustrating trying to coax out exactly what they want since it's such a wide area. Second of all it can take a lot of effort to get good at it to go beyond the button pusher stage. If you specialize such as being a modeler, particle / fluid guy, texturer and lighter or so on, you can cut out a lot of the programs and concentrate on the art and technique more closely but it limits your scope and jobs to film places large enough to break down work into different skill areas. If you're a generalist, you're for starters talking about learning huge programs with loads of different aspects and then after that supporting it with design skills, painting skills, lighting and composition skills as well as technical stuff in some cases. 3d is hoooooooooge but there's tonnes of possibilities.

 

To expand on what tomcat is saying, he may be correct that editors are payed more than mograph guys. One reason is that they operate at a broader level than effects guys - they deal with the entire story which is a far more important job than a single effects shot. If they fuck up the story, the 3d doesn't matter. The other way around though is more forgiving. Second of all in terms of hacks surviving the workplace I'll rephrase that as professionalism in some cases - for starters editors work far more closely with directors, they actually sit with them and interact with them so they have far more exposure to their end clients and thus the professional world. Graphics guys are a lot more sheltered and will often go through a producer or creative director. Thus they get less of the politics and bollox and tend to do things to satisfy themselves as much as the client. I'm not saying that it's a good thing, you do need to be savvy enough to know when to be a little schmoozy and know which fights you can win, something that normally only comes with exposure to clients.

 

Personally I'd say go for which you think you'll enjoy more. It's a tough industry to survive in, you deal with some assholes and the hours are nasty in a lot of cases - you really need to like what you're doing to get through the tough jobs or else it'll start badly affecting you. I think the internship idea is a good one, it'll give you a bit of a taste of things before you commit to something more permanent.

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lol. I think most of the freelancer editors we interview would agree with that, which is why they suck.

 

Absolutely go for editing.

First off, you can pick it up fast. Say 6 months to become a proficient editor,

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To expand on what tomcat is saying, he may be correct that editors are payed more than mograph guys. One reason is that they operate at a broader level than effects guys - they deal with the entire story which is a far more important job than a single effects shot.

 

And that, in a nutshell, is what i'm trying to say. You might not literally be a button monkey if you're a skilled 3D designer, but you are more often then not, not much more. The way in wich someone like ie. renascent uses 3D is 1 in a million, and even then, he is a designer 1st, and a "3D person" second.

If you have any desire growing into something/one else, you want to be as close as possible to the people calling the shots /sermonmode. 3D is as far away as it gets, in most cases, no matter how much creative freedom you get. You do as you are told.

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If you have any desire growing into something/one else, you want to be as close as possible to the people calling the shots /sermonmode.

This is true.

 

3D is as far away as it gets, in most cases, no matter how much creative freedom you get. You do as you are told.

This is half true.

 

People will not pigeon hole you because you know 3D. They will do it if you ONLY know 3D... so you better have some other skill that brings your style to life. Renascent is a great designer and skilled typographer which is in great demand. I got a BFA in Theatre Design and am always asked for input by the creative leads regarding storytelling, timing, and spatial relation. I'm sure there are 100 other winning combos that will get you into the inner creative circle if you want to be there.

 

It should be noted that all of this has to do with who you work for. Some companies don't listen to anyone; they are a monarchy with an army of generalists. The ones I like working for have space shuttle mission mentality where everybody's an astronaut, but each person specializes in a particular field.

 

-m

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Great Thread indeed...

 

I Say - Why choose one of them? go for both, dedicate half of the learning time you got availble for editing and the other half for 3d, see what drives you...

You'd might be satasfied equally with both and decide to learn them together, or you might prefer one and put the other one on hold ....

 

Speaking of renascent, everyone mentioned his Typographic/designing skills but I always thought he had more than that, I believe he also has some tremendous cutting/editing skills.

 

I bet you could ask the same question in a Sound forum regarding DJ'ing and Mixing tracks VS Composing your own tracks.

 

regarding the whole button pushing issue I'd have to say it kinda equalizes eventually, with 3D you might have to push more buttons -->>>

 

but what about being a cable slave? in a video editing enviroment I think youre more likely to hang around Cables (I would've probably hung myself on one of these eventually) , Raid Disks, Beta Recorders/Players , this part is usually not something a 3D artist has to deal with.

 

So whatever it is you're gonna choose it really doesn't matter as long as you're LOVING it.

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If you have any desire growing into something/one else, you want to be as close as possible to the people calling the shots /sermonmode. 3D is as far away as it gets, in most cases, no matter how much creative freedom you get. You do as you are told.

 

I don´t agree with that.

 

As far as I know, a lot of people that works close enough to hear the breathing of the guys that call the shots works just like a User Interface for someone else. And it can happen with a editor, a 3d person, or the cooker.

 

I think it is quite amazing to observe how experienced people work, but this should not be the reason of your choice. If you have an image of what you wan´t to become, go after it. Don´t try to make beautiful programmable curves in your path to reach your destiny, the external elements are already trying to make you loose your focus.

 

Well, and though you can learn a lot with teachers and friends at work, you got to hit the books man. There is some kind of knowledge that you gotta earn. That´s is also a chipper way to experiment alternative paths for your creativety... by yourself.

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Guest Sao_bento

If you want to be a shot caller, just practice paranoia, yelling, and passive aggressive behavior, it applies - to all the media arts.

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If you want to be a shot caller, just practice paranoia, yelling, and passive aggressive behavior, it applies - to all the media arts.

 

Don't forget the mantra "I'll know it when I see it!" and "That's not what I was thinking"

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