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danb

Graphic Design scales in Mographics?

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Just wanted to know if motion graphics use the same types of scales as graphic design? I forget the names of the modular scales in graphic design. I know one was point/pica scales, things like that.

 

If it does please point me in the direction as to which things i should learn for mograph.

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Just wanted to know if motion graphics use the same types of scales as graphic design? I forget the names of the modular scales in graphic design. I know one was point/pica scales, things like that.

 

If it does please point me in the direction as to which things i should learn for mograph.

 

 

no we don't use picas, most print places I've been too don't either. I think there was only one place I worked at that did. Motion gfx uses just pixels (pts)

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Those conventions are really for print. In AfterEffects, even fonts come up in pixels. Your image is always 720x540 [for SD anyway] whether your TV is 13" or the Jumbotron. We don't use picas or dpi because you're never going to print anything out...

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AVLEX078.JPG

 

Ok those were some pretty harsh replies. Anyways i wasn't asking how many points equal a pica. That's a pretty stupid question. I'm suprised no one could see past that. I was talking about things like the le corbusier modular scale. And there was another scale i learned in Graphic Design, which i forgot the name, where there were proportions with type faces, when laying out type faces on a page. That is what i'm asking are there proportion scales and layout practices in motion graphics? Is that better, sheesh?

 

Come on, lets here some intelligent replies.

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I have a sneaking suspicion that most motion graphics designers, if not all, eyeball it.

 

Yeah that's the reason why i started this thread, i was wondering if people just did whatever looked good and judging from the replies that seems to be the case.

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i don't know any of these scales that you're referring to (and I was in print design before :o ). are they just proportional ratios, like your headline should be twice as big as the sub-headline? i don't think people stick too closely to formulas like this, but are hopefully considering proportions on some level.

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I think once you become very experienced in design, you start to use those building blocks of design without actually reverting back to specific scales and such. I would think that a lot of the motion graphics artists who happened to center their layout around the Golden Mean did so because they loved the look of it, not neccessarily as a conscious choice, but more of an instinct based around experience. I use a lot of grids in my work, but it's not because I am a nazi about design grids, it's more of that internal "feels good" approach. Hope that answers what you were asking.

Edited by BOY:1:DER

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Guest Sao_Bento
I've got 4 books on grids, but the writing is muddled and I still don't understand what they're about.

All of their examples seem to break the grid.

JMB is the default for grid stuff, but I know the older books can be a little hard to read.

I recently picked up a copy of this book:

http://www.powells.com/biblio?isbn=9781568984650

I consider it to be a pretty well done contemporary approach to the subject.

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Ok i see what you guys are saying. In my mind it would seem pretty difficult anyways to stick to a certain design layout in mograph because of all the movement.

 

yes, because of the movement, sticking to a grid per-se can be very difficult (and extremely boring!). however, i don't think that's what you were originally asking. I thought you were asking more about ratios and proportions. so in regards to that, while i don't think its important to use specific formulas and ratios, it is always important to consider your visual hierarchy and what elements are most important.

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Guest Sao_Bento
I don't know if any of the replies would even fall into the category of harsh.

Piss off.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

how about that one?

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i think armin hoffmann's "graphic design manual" is probably the best treatment of proportion as it applies to graphic design. it's not the easiest to read, like sao bento said, but it's worth the effort.

 

asymmetric but balanced compositions that activate the space properly are generally the way to go. avoid symmetry.

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