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ocubex

Graphic to Motion Design

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Hi All

 

I have worked as a graphic designer for a little over 5 years. I think I actaully prefer motion design but was wondering if I could get some advice on how to make the transition. I have been learning After Effects and flash on my own time but find it difficultly slow as I still need to keep up to date with graphic design which in itself can be quite demanding. I am seriously considering going on a 1 year post graduate course to movet things on. If any of you have experience of crossing over from graphic to Motion design, please let me know what your experience has been. My main concern is if I take the plung by stopping work as a graphic designer to move into motion design, I may start from the bottom all over again which may be tough financially.

 

I live in UK not sure if that makes a difference, thanks ahead of time.

 

Regards

 

ocube

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A post grad course sounds like a good idea. I jumped on a course a couple of years after graduating from a BA in illustration. I found it rewarding in that you can really focus on learning the tools needed (time consuming stuff...), and not worry about getting your work done at the same time. I wouldn´t worry to much about starting from the bottom again. The experience you have from design will only strengthen your motion work, and if it doesn´t work out you can always go back :)

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I concur, knowing how to design is the hard part, the rest is technical.

 

thanks for your response guys. Sometimes I get frustrated trying to grapple with the tecnical bits. Thats why I am considering a course.

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I concur, knowing how to design is the hard part, the rest is technical.

 

3D-spatial and temporal conceptualization are merely technical?

 

Don't be put off, but there are various ingredients in a good motion designer, and while they probably can all be learnt or taught, they come more easily to some people than others. I have an untested theory that being a musician helps if you move into time based media.

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I am seriously considering going on a 1 year post graduate course to movet things on.

ocube

 

I think linking up with other motion designers or studios as an intern would help tremendously as well. While you're in school's the best time to do that because you have the "course credit" angle to use. There are a lot of good studios in London so finding one shouldn't be too hard, and the experience of working on real projects will be more valuable than anything you learn in a classroom.

Media's converging so broadening your skillsets into motion is a good move!

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ughhh. amen.

 

But coming from a video background will give you the technical / temporal / spatial knowledge you need. After that the desgin stuff is easy... right? (note the scarcasm)

 

BKM

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Guest Sao_Bento
I agree with this.

Timing is definitely a key component. I don't know if it matters wether it comes from music, traditional animation, film editing, etc. but you're going to be up the creek without it.

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i've played drums and guitar for about 15 years, it definitely helped a lot when i was learning motion design... when i play drums i play a lot of syncopated phrasings, which i think of as being really similar to using rhythm in (static) design. you make things interesting in music with choice accents here and there, while respecting the tempo and overall song much as you break the grid tastefully to make a composition interesting.

 

i like drummers like chad sexton and john stanier that are super tight and rigid but use syncopation to make it cool much like a brockman or hofmann would break the rules tactically to create interest.

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Guest Sao_Bento
i've played drums and guitar for about 15 years, it definitely helped a lot when i was learning motion design... when i play drums i play a lot of syncopated phrasings, which i think of as being really similar to using rhythm in (static) design. you make things interesting in music with choice accents here and there, while respecting the tempo and overall song much as you break the grid tastefully to make a composition interesting.

 

i like drummers like chad sexton and john stanier that are super tight and rigid but use syncopation to make it cool much like a brockman or hofmann would break the rules tactically to create interest.

And now you see the value of capoeira, which is based on "make a pattern, break a pattern".

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Guest Sao_Bento
I always thought that working as an editor helps a lot with timing and visual pacing in motion graphics.

I think it also helps view things in less rigid ways. These days people feel so compelled to make every project be one long shot that flys through some elaborate environment. When you look back at the earlier Imaginary Forces stuff, etc. It was more editing than design. Good editing of computer generated elements and interesting compositions layered with quality typography.

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I think it also helps view things in less rigid ways. These days people feel so compelled to make every project be one long shot that flys through some elaborate environment. When you look back at the earlier Imaginary Forces stuff, etc. It was more editing than design. Good editing of computer generated elements and interesting compositions layered with quality typography.

 

I wonder if there is a relation to the one travelling shot in mograph with the choice of the long steadicam shots (ala PT Anderson/LaChapelle/Altman) in film as opposed to most films which use a cut to tell the story. Me, I prefer the cuts. Each cut is a powerful thing.

 

Sometimes I think mograph artists feel that cuts may be cheating because you only have to work on short phrases were it's more tempting to show off with a long sequence.

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I wonder if there is a relation to the one travelling shot in mograph with the choice of the long steadicam shots (ala PT Anderson/LaChapelle/Altman) in film as opposed to most films which use a cut to tell the story. Me, I prefer the cuts. Each cut is a powerful thing.

 

Sometimes I think mograph artists feel that cuts may be cheating because you only have to work on short phrases were it's more tempting to show off with a long sequence.

 

I would agree with that. I have found myself trying to pull off the long sequence and then asking myself why when the shorter edits turned out to have more punch.

 

Nice comments.

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I think having a music background helps in a number of ways. Rhythm of course is a key design principle. There are others I am convinced however. The structure of music is very much like a story - beginning, middle and end. The way music is broken up into notes, measures, sections, movements, etc gives you as sense of components that make up an overall piece so it becomes a very translatable methodology to the world of motion graphics.

 

For me, I find music very visual anyway so as a music major in college (and being a high school band geek) moving into the visual mediums was a very natural transition. I went from Music major to Film major to Graphic Design Major where I finally rested but, I still have parts of the others with me.

 

-gl

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I was a dancer for years (still a dancer but too old now to be a professional) and a painter. Went into Graphic Design, and in my 2nd year took a motion graphics class. It made so much sense..music, choreography, rhythm....

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I came from a design background. Started out in print, moved to interactive design, and luckily, learned motion design on the job. If you can get a job that values your skills as a designer and gives you the freedom to work on a few motion based projects, that's probably the best way to make the transition.

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I too have struggled getting my concepts out of the long-continuos-shot headspace. Once you realize that cuts can be just as effective, that becomes a valuable thing.

 

As far as learning the concepts of motion based design, I think there is a lot more to it than just technical skills. Most people think it's just learning some new software unfortunately. Some great things to learn are concepts such as fluidity, direction of motion, editing, anticipation, telling an effective story, etc. etc.

 

I have never seen a good learning resource for these types of things though. For example - direction of motion. You can get some very different tones by considering what direction that things are moving in. This includes elements on screen as well as camera movement. If all the elements move from left to right throughout a portion of a piece, it gives a really fluid feeling and a sense of order, the viewer can anticipate what's coming. If one of those things moves the other way, it breaks the continuity. You can use this as an effective tool, or you can not really know about it, and have it hinder the success of a piece.

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