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terminalsix

Billboard resolution

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Hey guys, i have a canon rebel camera, 8 megapixels and i need a photo for a billboard with 12 meters / 3 meters, do you think that it is possible to scale up the RAW file or it's better to use a old camera with film?

 

thanks

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I would probably suggest using slide film on the "old school" camera. Scan it in with a good machine at highest settings and you should be good to go. I worked for a print for a bit and we seemed to have incredible results using this method.

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Well depends how you are going to use your photo... Is it a close-up shot? or full body? Are you going to manipulate it later or will be just color correction?

8mb is enough resolution for any printing material. And remember most part of your "target" will look an outdoor from at least 7 meters from your photo... So dont go crazy about resolution.

Edited by PauloBlob

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You can try fractal up-rezzing, but you will probably find that your limiting factor is the quality of your optics (lack of sharpness) and digital noise, before you have to worry about pixellation.

In the old days you would be told to use a medium format film camera rather than 35mm if you were going larger than A4, and there are medium format options for digital cameras, though they are pretty expensive.

I would certainly look at getting the best lens on your digital camera - usually the stock bundled lens is not super-sharp, when you inspect the detail. If shooting indoors, get lots of light on your subject so you can close down your aperture to get sharper focus (cheap lenses are much less crisp at full aperture). Also primes (fixed focus) tend to be sharper than zoom lenses.

Edited by basilisk

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file resolution is measured in pixels, so the resolution unit of measurement is pixels per inch or PPI.

 

That’s opposed to the resolution of your printer, which is measured in dots-per-inch or DPI. There is no one-to-one relationship between PPI and DPI.

 

The real question from a production standpoint is: “How many pixels do I need?”

 

It all mostly depends on where and how the image will be viewed. For typical artwork, the correct viewing distance is somewhere between once and twice the diagonal distance. So for example, you hold magazine about 12-18” away when you read it.

 

The same holds true for signs. Because signs are big, the viewing distances may be quite large - and as you increase viewing distance, you are able to DECREASE the resolution. Right?

 

Just realize the price you pay for high resolution is large file size and slow processing times and increased storage cost.

 

Here are some Resolution Rules-of-Thumb: If you are printing a D or E size sign (24x36 or 36x48) you need about 100 ppi at final print size. That equates to about 4 MB per square foot.

 

That’s before it’s save with compression or anything like that; as an uncompressed RGB.

 

If you’re printing larger, say an 8 foot banner, the file resolution can go down to about 50 or even 25 ppi at final size.

 

Believe it or not, most billboards are printed at 10-15 ppi. You get too close and that hamburger is nothing but a bunch of great big nasty dots. But from 100 yards away at 75 miles an hour or so, it looks great.

 

There’s a cool trick in Photoshop to determine how big you can go with any photo file. Let me show you. Open a file in Photoshop and choose Image > Image Size. This is Photoshop’s Resolution Calculator.

 

To find out how large you can reproduce a file, uncheck the Resample Image checkbox. This turns off Photoshop’s interpolation engine, which allows Photoshop to add or remove pixels from an image. Now we can only re-arrange the data we already have.

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