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Neue Method Portfolio Update + First Reel

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Hey folks,

I just recently updated my portfolio site Neue Method w/ bunch of recent projects including my first reel.

Let me know your thoughts on both, but more in particular the reel/montage.

Thanks!

 

 

Site:

http://www.neue-method.com

 

Montage:

http://neue-method.commotion/montage_07.html

Edited by Neue Method®

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You have a very strong design sense... great composition and use of color in a lot of your motion work.

 

My issue with the reel is the pacing and lack of movement. You very rarely see you implementing any z-space camera movement in your reel which really does a number on the pacing. The edit is quite slow as well... I would recommend faster cuts and maybe a more upbeat song to compliment that.

 

Like I said, you have the design stuff down... you just need to keep experimenting with AE and start playing around with some different camera movements and transitions.... particularily in z-space.

 

keep it up! oh, and i LOVE the site. very user-friendly and it looks pretty tight too.

 

b

 

 

Hey folks,

I just recently updated my portfolio site Neue Method w/ bunch of recent projects including my first reel.

Let me know your thoughts on both, but more in particular the reel/montage.

Thanks!

Site:

http://www.neue-method.com/new

 

Montage:

http://neue-method.com/new/motion/montage_07.html

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I really like your work. Its really sweet. As far as i can see your web skills are really good but you dont have a lot of motion work. I would love to see your design in a good animators hand.(that means you or any other).

Really cool work. Hey dont you want to send me that tattoo machine you have... i cant find a tatto machine in the web :lol:

 

see yah man!!!

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While the website stuff is sweet, leave it off a design reel. It's not to promote your ability to compose still spaces, its about how you time and release your animated elements. I say take all the web interface stuff out. The song's good, the animated bits are great, I just don't see the point of showing all your talents in a mograph/animation showreel.

 

Don't look at my reel in return because technically I'm in no position to criticise...I'm not very prolific...

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You have a very strong design sense... great composition and use of color in a lot of your motion work.

 

My issue with the reel is the pacing and lack of movement. You very rarely see you implementing any z-space camera movement in your reel which really does a number on the pacing. The edit is quite slow as well... I would recommend faster cuts and maybe a more upbeat song to compliment that.

 

Like I said, you have the design stuff down... you just need to keep experimenting with AE and start playing around with some different camera movements and transitions.... particularily in z-space.

 

Ditto, this is exactly the next step you need to take, very VERY strong design sense! good work

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You're a designer, and you're an animator, because you do design, and you do some animation. But what you need to think about going forward is that you have to design the animation. Right now you're making print pieces and moving around the elements in after effects and/or flash, but for the most part, that movement isn't contributing anything. You're just moving them because you can. There's nothing I can get by playing your reel that I couldn't get from looking at stills of your reel. So whether you're animating a website or a film, consider WHY you're animating and what additional value you're imparting to the elements and the composition by animating them. The critical idea here is that the motion that you impart to an element is like any other quality you choose to give it; texture, shape, color, etc... which collectively give that element some recognition with the viewer, and that subsequently gives it meaning. The motion of the element can significantly impact its meaning. When you're designing the motion, you can make an apple fall like a rock or fall like a feather, and your viewer will take something different from each. Of course, an animated element doesn't have to have real-world motion, but it should at least have intention.

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I liked the HI-TEK site that was dope

As for the reel itself I felt it moved to slow but the pacing to the audio track was slow also

Maybe spead it up

 

The skillz piece was dope too I didn't know he was still rapping

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Hey guys! I've been meaning to post back here sooner. First of all, thanks for the feedback and comments everyone. A lot of the feedback was unanimous across the board and i totally agree with points such as:

1) pacing

2) more vibrant audio track

3) lack of z-space depth (Huge!)

4) leave the interactive pieces out

 

PauloBlob, you're correct. I haven't tapped into the motion realm all that much hence the reason for why the majority of my work is interactive. With saying that, the next several projects down the pipeline will change that as they will be designed from conception to be full-on motion pieces instead of using designs created in the past that were never really intended for motion.

 

Overall i knew this was going to be my last update/version of www.neue-method.com and i really wanted to put together a collection of works i've created over the years within AE before moving onto new things.

 

Any new works from now on can be viewed here at www.ryan-massiah.com

 

Thanks again - as the comments were very informative. Now i'm officially off too Vegas! ;]

 

Cheers!

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like most others mentioned, your 2D/compositional design skills are very strong, but that unfortunately makes the underdeveloped time/movement design even more pronounced.

 

as with many print-originated designers, it seems likely that your biggest hurdle is the conceptual process... here are a few priniciples i think might help if you incorporate them into your initial conceptual process, almost as laws... (btw, these aren't really specific commentary on your reel, but rather general thingees for print designers i've found to be useful)...

 

instead of thinking in terms of "what imagery, shape and composition conveys the [communicative concept i've deemed as central]?", try ignoring shape and composition completely and think "what type of movement, rhythm and music convey the [communicative concept i've deemed as central]?". try to resolve this first before thinking in terms of shape, color, composition, etc.

 

try to avoid the concept of a logo that is "built into existence" via animation. though this is standard practice in mograph, it is unfortunately often the default approach. try to force yourself to find ways to use animation to punctuate/illustrate the concepts, rather than simply bring into existence the word which linguistically spells out the concept. try to have the reveal/build of the logo/type be a side effect of the elements that are animated, rather than the animation's prime purpose.

 

no static resolved logos/type. once it's revealed, keep some kind of movement (not just camera drift or moving background) so that it doesn't feel like the last page of a novel (you see the blank bottom half of the page and know it's pretty much done)-- it shouldn't necessarily feel like all the life/narrative/movement is over (ie. if it's made of flowers, have them slowly continue to bloom & have petals dropping off, or have the gears that make up the double Os continue to turn, etc)

 

and this one is the hardest: during the animation process, constantly be asking yourself "is this just a glorified wipe?" and be an asshole about it. it's probably impossible to do any mograph project with a deadline and not use some form of a glorified wipe, but they are the default means of bringing things on screen (other than 2.5d camera moves) and jerkily pushing yourself to find other methods will only help you develop your skillz. or keep adding frosting and cherries until it's a wipe that is so glorified to such a great extent it can no longer really be considered any form of a wipe.

 

again, your design sense is very strong, and these don't all necessarily apply to your work. and though it's 99% of the time impossible to follow all those rules, it will help in the long run to try. sorry if i sound preachy and i hope this somehow helps.

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really liked the reel, but I agree with daveglanz; it could have a little more content in there. Not sure if I'm for or against the final spot with the board - although it works frame by frame, the animation lacks a little bit of character. you could probably have had the tail/noseslide landing later, and I would have had the camera a little higher too. I was really impressed with the wheel textures though!

 

 

Dan

Edited by dan_hin

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Cool man. You have some nice shots in there. They're testament to your developing skill. I think the montage itself stutters a bit, though. I would imagine that, given that this reel spans 6 years of work, you probably have enough material that you can keep moving from one shot to the next without ever landing on, or making us watch, something static. Granted, most of these shots are logo/statement reveals, but the edit should pay more attention to the action of the reveal than what it is that's revealed. Because if you're going to use a video montage presentation, it should be a presentation in which how things move is important. Otherwise, you're showcasing static designs, in which case you probably want to present them in a static medium. Point being: a motion graphics montage is largely about things communicated through motion/action/movement, so maximize on that.

 

Secondly, I think the character of your audio choice is mismatched to your work in almost every way. That's a fairly subjective comment, but it's coming from the perspective of a member of your audience, so that bears some weight. I'm not saying it couldn't work, either. But you'd have to really compliment or juxtapose the character of that audio in your shot choice and your editing. Because right now it's kind of like "I like dogs, and i like ice cream, so i'm going to make dog-flavored ice cream". It's very possible to take two things you like and make something that no one particularly likes.

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Looking back at the montage now... I definitely agree with your comments of needing to keep the work moving. Especially with my audio choice. There is a lot of room to play with the beat, for a more dynamic edit. It is also more apparent, that quite a few of the shots are essentially static moves with a reveal at the end.

 

For the majority of projects that I have been fortunate to work on over the years, they mainly consisted of me designing styleframes. If there was potential of doing animation, it would be an end tag or network package elements. Analyzing the great work posted on this forum, Motionographer and Vimeo. I really need to move forward with pushing myself outside of my comfort zone, when it comes to animation.

 

This year my goal is to focus on creating more dynamic camera moves (2D/3D). Especially when it comes to self-initiated projects.

 

Much respect Binky!

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Saying that you need more dynamic camera moves is like saying that you need more frosting on a cupcake because it doesn't taste good yet. It's like adding an action scene for some momentary drama; it doesn't really make the movie any better. What you really want to do is treat the camera like you do any of the other elements, namely as an actor whose job is to impart something to the viewer. The special role of the camera, however, is that the entire spot is seen through its unique and very specific perspective. So it is really in charge of actively or passively telling whatever story there is to tell. That shouldn't be confused with the idea that its job is necessarily to be whizzy. Sometimes the camera is going to stand in front of an oncoming truck, quaking, about to leap out of the way. Sometimes it's going to pass over tiny objects like a microscope being handled by someone with unsteady hands. Sometimes it's going to fly through impossible structures like it's strapped to a fighter jet. Sometimes it's the eye of god, or of a newborn, or of a rock watching the weathering of a shoreline over thousands of years. Point being that it's more productive to think of camera animation as a way to convey information, attitude, perspective, than it is to think of it as a way to layer more candy on a boring cupcake. It's the same set of concerns you'd have if you were shooting real live action elements with a real camera, but instead of carrying a camera around, or bolting it to a dolly, or flying it on a quadcopter, or having a webcam on a laptop or a gopro on a bmx helmet, you have to keyframe it. Same process of planning out what you need to do with it, but animation is the execution of that plan.

 

So you may want to redefine your goal to something more like: this year I will explore animation as a means to convey things to an audience, and I will begin thinking about the camera as an important element to be considered in that exploration. That might be a good start.

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Wow. You've got some great work in there. Using the Top 3, Bottom 3 feedback (bottom 3 just means less impact, not "bad"), and agreeing that the music, while it could be made to work for the darker segments you've produced is a little bit "dissonant" with some of the stuff...

 

 

Top

1. Profile of the Chicago kid starting around 42 seconds

2. Nokia phone spot starting around 16 seconds

3. GameOn TV starting around 52 seconds

 

Honorable mention: Canada-Russia Challenge

 

(both the first and third item especially, fit with your music, while shots like the Nokia sequences and the "Fit My Sole" fit less well...)

 

 

Bottom

1. Skateboard clip at around 19 seconds (this is probably the weakest clip IMHO, if you wanted to take one out)

2. Tessa and Scott around 21 seconds

3. Make Out More (this one isn't bad in a different reel maybe but feels out of place here).

 

 

Keep up the good work!

Edited by Zmotive

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