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ptacnik

question about end crawl in AE

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hello hello

 

I'm doing an end credits ani in After Effects (cs3) and having issues with final output. I've searched for a work around but couldn't find much so I apologize if this has been posted and I missed it.

 

The ram preview is just OKAY but once I output this sucker it gets even jumpier. Ive tried .mov (animation) as well as sgi and tiff sequences just to check...

 

Here is some info about the project

 

HD 1920 x 1080 @ 23.97

 

the length of the animation needs to remain at 1min16 sec

 

the text itself is Red and White and is created in AE. Only 2 keyframes for the animation. (position starts at 1124 and ends at -9491)

 

 

I thought maybe I could extend the comp (maybe by 3x) and bring the render back in to remap it to 1:16.... perhaps there is a better work around? Is this a pretty common issue for end crawls?

 

Thanks for your time!

Edited by ptacnik

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Id like to hear some feedback on this as well. AT the place I work at we dont use AE for titling for this same reason. We use Premiere or FInal Cut and get better results for titling. AND this may sound insane, but we've actually gotten the best results rendering titles as a sequence from our 3d packages. Go figure.

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Guest Sao_Bento
Id like to hear some feedback on this as well. AT the place I work at we dont use AE for titling for this same reason. We use Premiere or FInal Cut and get better results for titling. AND this may sound insane, but we've actually gotten the best results rendering titles as a sequence from our 3d packages. Go figure.

Check out the Meyer's formulas for text crawls and credit rolls. It was in their books, I'm sure it's on the Pro Video Coalition site, in their books, etc.

http://cybmotion.com/sharing/index.html

 

The reason things like Chyrons do a better job of credit rolls is because they're already set to move at the correct speeds. Why 3D works better, I have no idea other than that the anti-aliasing controls in 3D apps are generally a lot more flexible.

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http://www.mercuryjones.com/aepresets.html

 

Thanks for the help... i was directed to the above link. Just by applying this Preset it animates based on the layer (or precomp) size

 

 

On first inspection is seems to be working OKAY lol... I'm also doing a test by rendering a comp that is 3x the length to time remap. (or twixtor) I'll post more later when I figure out what is working best.

 

And any other suggestion come to mind please let me know.

 

thanks

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Here's what the "Best practices for creating text and vector graphics for video" section of After Effects CS3 Help on the Web says:

 

 

Text that looks good on your computer screen as you are creating it can sometimes look bad when viewed in a final output movie. These differences can arise from the device used to view the movie or from the compression scheme used to encode the movie. The same is true for other vector graphics, such as shapes in shape layers. Keep the following in mind as you create and animate text and vector graphics for video:

 

* You should always preview your movie on the same sort of device that your audience will use to view it, such as an NTSC video monitor. (See Preview on an external video monitor.)

 

* Avoid sharp color transitions, especially from one highly saturated color to its complementary color. Sharp color transitions are difficult for many compression schemes—such as those used by MPEG and JPEG standards—to encode. This can cause visual noise near sharp transitions. For analog television, the same sharp transitions can cause spikes outside the allowed range for the signal, also causing noise.

 

* When text will be over moving images, make sure that the text has a contrasting border (such as a glow or a stroke) so that the text is still readable when something the same color as the fill passes behind the text.

 

* Avoid thin horizontal elements, which can vanish from the frame if they happen to be on an even scan line during an odd field, or vice versa. The height of the horizontal bar in a capital H, for example, should be three pixels or greater. You can thicken horizontal elements by increasing font size, using a bold (or faux bold) style, or applying a stroke. (See Formatting characters.)

 

* When animating text to move vertically—for scrolling credits, for example—move the text vertically at a rate in pixels per second that is an even multiple of the field rate for the interlaced video format. This prevents a kind of twitter that can come from the text movement being out of phase with the scan lines. For NTSC, good values include 0, 119.88, and 239.76 pixels per second; for PAL, good values include 0, 100, and 200 pixels per second.

 

Apply the Autoscroll - Vertical animation preset in the Behaviors category to quickly create a vertical text crawl.

 

Fortunately, many problems with text in video and compressed movie formats can be solved with one simple technique: Apply Fast Blur to the text layer, with a Blurriness setting between 1 and 2. A slight blur can soften color transitions and cause thin horizontal elements to expand.

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