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Todd Kopriva

Michael Coleman on After Effects CS4 being for Intel-architecture processors only

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"After considering all the information, we decided that the benefits of the new workflows and features outweigh the downside of dropping PowerPC support. As a result, After Effects CS3 will be the last universal binary Macintosh version and After Effects CS4 will be Intel-only on the Mac. Premiere Pro, Encore, and Soundbooth are already Intel-only in CS3, so Production Premium Suite users will already be accustomed to this requirement.

 

By focusing on Intel Macs, we save a huge amount of engineering and testing time. This means that we will be able to complete more features for a larger group of customers and deliver the best release possible. Plus, some CS4 technology is so new that it never existed on PowerPC Macs. "

 

See Michael Coleman's blog for the whole explanation.

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Shouldn't be too much of a problem for most pro users, since those 8-core MacPros are allready so much faster than the last PowerMacs i won't miss a PPC version at all.

 

But beware those PowerPC fanboys that are still out there! The might not be using After Effects at all but they shure gonna shout at Adobe for abandoning the holy platform.

Edited by levante

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Just make it Fast Fast Fast! Able to utilize multi-Core and tons of memory! If a hardware company dumps a cpu then the software companies should do the same. Anyone using Power PC machine isn't charging enough. Lol. Oh and make CS4 Fast really fast, i want to hit the space bar and have realtime, adobe should make it so fast RAM previews will be in he same boat as Power PC. Go ahead a rebuild AE from the ground up so there is no more legacy code excuses!

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This makes me wonder, how many of you freelancing have been to (pretty big and well known) shops in NYC or LA or wherever that

are STILL using several dual 2GB PPCs, or other old ass boxes?

 

This bold move by adobe may finally separate the wheat from the chaff.

Just make it stable and fast.

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good move. anyone still using PPC probably isn't taking full advantage of the latest adobe apps anway.

 

I am constantly surprised how long some shops hold onto old hardware, though. They have extremely expensive artists who are totally held back by the hardware they are using. Thats dumb business.

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good move. anyone still using PPC probably isn't taking full advantage of the latest adobe apps anway.

 

Meh, pretty sweeping generalization. Also, if a studio has 15 machines, and the newest top-of-the-line mac is ~$7k, I think it's bad business for small-medium sized shops to spend $105k+/year on new machines year after year. I agree that shops should have *high performance* machines, but that doesn't necessarily mean brand new. I've worked with some quality shops in LA that still have some PPCs laying around, and either way they should always hold on to old hardware as long as it works... throw that baby on the farm!

Edited by chriskelley

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full 64 bit support is not going to happen on the mac in CS4, it is for the PC though, search mograph there is a thread on it somewhere, which has a link from one of the adobe guys discussing the problem with recoding

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I'll pretty much always accept older machines being left behind in favor of newer/ better features in software. In fact, I prefer this to software being bogged down trying to be backward compatible back to 1987. IMO if you're serious about this business you should probably plan on a machine update about every two years anyway, and build that into your business plan. Also, it's not like you can't use AE CS3 for a while if you're strapped and can't afford an Intel machine.

 

I always get a laugh out of the crying that goes on in some mac centric sites about certain machines no longer being supported. There's people out there with G3's from 1999 that feel it's a CRIME that Apple has left their "investment" twisting in in the wind by not supporting Leopard on G3's.

 

I'm hoping 64 bit support comes to the mac for AE CS4, but indeed the rumors seem to point the other way. Something about the PC guys having one up on me really gets under my skin.

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Guest Sao_Bento
I'm hoping 64 bit support comes to the mac for AE CS4, but indeed the rumors seem to point the other way. Something about the PC guys having one up on me really gets under my skin.

It's never a good sign when features start to be platform specific. That's usually the first step towards your platform getting dropped. I'm not saying that Adobe will stop developing software for the Mac, but then again, the childish war between Adobe and Apple has lowered my expectations for both companies. We desperately need some competition in this market, both for tools and OS. OSS can't cut it by design, something tells me Microsoft can't re-invent themselves to such a degree (even with CPB as their agency). Obi wan, you're our only hope . . .

 

r2leia.jpg

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OSS can't cut it by design

 

Care to expand on that? I don't see the logic at all...unless you're on about the FOSS aspect, in which case I could agree. However, breaking down the proprietary and closed source barriers are probably one of the better things that could happen for competition.

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You guys really know how to make a guy with a Quad G5 feel like a troglodyte. She still renders quickly and performs well. It's only had to get it's power supply repaired once (that thing is 1000 watts!).

 

But honestly...yeah...my Intel MBP gets 90% of my attention. ;)

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Care to expand on that? I don't see the logic at all...unless you're on about the FOSS aspect, in which case I could agree. However, breaking down the proprietary and closed source barriers are probably one of the better things that could happen for competition.

Open source stuff is created by engineers with free time. It's extremely rare that engineers can create an application that operates at the same level as a full software development team. Normally design leads engineering. Most of the complaints I see relate to functionality - if they are stuck at that level, what hope is there for user interface and workflow? Open Source is good for specific tools and solving specific problems, particularly if the authors are on staff, but the chances of something like Blender ever being truly competitive in the marketplace are extremely slim. Add in the workflow based toolsets that Adobe, Apple, and Discreet are providing and you've raised the bar that much higher.

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You guys really know how to make a guy with a Quad G5 feel like a troglodyte. She still renders quickly and performs well. It's only had to get it's power supply repaired once (that thing is 1000 watts!).

 

But honestly...yeah...my Intel MBP gets 90% of my attention. ;)

 

Don't worry, my second workstation is a Quad G5, and it's been one of the best machines I've ever used. I suppose once CS4 is out I might have to switch to using two Intel machines though, since I won't be able to work on the same AE files on the G5 as I do on the Intel box. Maybe Adobe and Apple get along better than we think they do; this will certainly inspire many people to dump their G5's a bit quicker than they might have. ;)

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Meh, pretty sweeping generalization. Also, if a studio has 15 machines, and the newest top-of-the-line mac is ~$7k, I think it's bad business for small-medium sized shops to spend $105k+/year on new machines year after year. I agree that shops should have *high performance* machines, but that doesn't necessarily mean brand new. I've worked with some quality shops in LA that still have some PPCs laying around, and either way they should always hold on to old hardware as long as it works... throw that baby on the farm!

 

I don't disagree with you at all.

Upgrading 15 machines every year doesn't make sense. At the same time having talented and expensive artists idling for hours in a day quickly adds up also.

I keep around my 3 year old machines for rendering, but I keep my main workstation kitted out so I can keep moving.

 

While computers aren't getting cheaper overall, cpu power is, and I'm glad to see Adobe making some tough decisions to harness more of that.

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Open source stuff is created by engineers with free time. It's extremely rare that engineers can create an application that operates at the same level as a full software development team. Normally design leads engineering. Most of the complaints I see relate to functionality - if they are stuck at that level, what hope is there for user interface and workflow? Open Source is good for specific tools and solving specific problems, particularly if the authors are on staff, but the chances of something like Blender ever being truly competitive in the marketplace are extremely slim. Add in the workflow based toolsets that Adobe, Apple, and Discreet are providing and you've raised the bar that much higher.

 

I see what you're saying, however I still don't personally agree that it has to do with the OSS model. That is more to the point that discreet, adobe, etc have been around for a lonnnnng time...long enough to really get their workflow and program interconnectivity working well. The thing with OSS is that its success lies largely on the shoulders of the strength and involvement of the community...and since you mention Blender; how many 3D apps out there have progressed (in terms of where they were) as much, as quickly, as it has over the last year? I'm not saying it is the best (it really does need a GUI overhaul), but it is hardly a case of the development team doing stuff 'when they get around to it'. Granted, anything motion related is probably where the OSS community is lacking the most.

 

But, my point of OSS (and its overall benefit for professionals)...with the right licensing in place to protect the financial assets of the parent company, in an open application if you don't like the way a program does something, or need a specific feature - just add it (either yourself if you're so inclined, or contract out). Anyway...nuff of an early mornin rant for me...we'll just have to agree to disagree on that one I suppose.

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I think I can understand the position of people who would like their PPC investment to last a bit longer.

I mean, it's a fact of life that a 36 month-old computer is obsolete.

But the pain point is that a quad core G5, if sold today, would be a an average computer in terms of performance. It sits in the middle between Apple's current consumer CPUs and the professional ones. If you have one, you may not be desperate for more performance. So it hurts having to replace it because of a course of things that it's not strictly performance-related.

Of course I understand that Adobe needs to move on, and that this is the right thing in develoment terms. But I can also understand that a Quad G5 is far from being a paperweight.

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Guest Sao_Bento
I see what you're saying, however I still don't personally agree that it has to do with the OSS model. That is more to the point that discreet, adobe, etc have been around for a lonnnnng time...long enough to really get their workflow and program interconnectivity working well. The thing with OSS is that its success lies largely on the shoulders of the strength and involvement of the community...and since you mention Blender; how many 3D apps out there have progressed (in terms of where they were) as much, as quickly, as it has over the last year? I'm not saying it is the best (it really does need a GUI overhaul), but it is hardly a case of the development team doing stuff 'when they get around to it'. Granted, anything motion related is probably where the OSS community is lacking the most.

 

But, my point of OSS (and its overall benefit for professionals)...with the right licensing in place to protect the financial assets of the parent company, in an open application if you don't like the way a program does something, or need a specific feature - just add it (either yourself if you're so inclined, or contract out). Anyway...nuff of an early mornin rant for me...we'll just have to agree to disagree on that one I suppose.

You've made my point. Despite the incredible knowledge and dedication of the people who have developed Blender, it is considered unusable by the majority of people who try it due to the steep learning curve. Although the underlying code and feature set may be incredible, what good is it if no one can figure it out? You're absolutely right that Adobe, Apple, Discreet, etc. have got their sh*t together and are able to consistently release software that, while far from perfect, is able to serve as a dependable day to day solution for a large number of people. Until OSS can provide a real viable alternative, no one is going to go there. I wish it would happen, I really do, but as someone who works in a software/hardware development environment, I can say with much confidence that OSS will not figure prominently in this field for several years to come (the exception being in-house tools developed for a specific pipeline).

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