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Kmksunfire

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Good at what? And what kind of job?

Your reel says you're a "mograph artist". What does that mean to you? What do you think a "mograph artist" does, and who hires a "mograph artist"?

 

I'm giving you a hard time, but only because I think it would benefit you to be really specific about what it is you're trying to do. You need to know where your value lies, because if you don't know, it's going to be hard to figure out who you're likely to be valuable to. What I see is that you have some design skills, but they're largely a result of a lot of time studying videocopilot tutorials and such. I get that you've been through a graphic design program, but it wasn't super great, so you've got to play catch-up. All that is totally fine. Know your strengths. Know your weaknesses. You're definitely in a better spot than the strict tutorialists because you've got a bit of a design education, so it's time to really play to that. I can't tell you exactly what that means, cuz it'd take me years to do it. But if you keep reading, looking, listening, learning, you'll continue to pick it up. Your education is in your hands, and no one else's.

 

In the meantime, yes, you're employable. By whom, I don't know. But there are places who will hire you as a junior. And at those places your primary job will be to learn as much as you possibly can. If you want to do a brute force search for work in your area, you can check mographwiki.net And when you've learned stuff working somewhere, move on to somewhere better and learn a bunch more. And repeat.

 

And sorry I'm being so vague about your actual reel. There's not really much I can think to say without launching into the years of design theory speech. :)

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Good enough at motion graphics to get a job for a studio that works on mid level stuff, not for prologue, or troika, but not the news.

You might be able to find that mid-level job. Or you may have to spend some time "paying your dues" doing lower-level work. Whatever fate bestows upon you, use it to continue learning. That's part of the fun of the job. You can be 10 years into it and still figuring it out.

 

I won't lie or hide it, video copilot and fxphd is pretty much how I learned how to use after effects.

You're definitely not hiding it. It's fully on display. :)

Tutorial sites like that are a perfectly decent way to learn the tools. And you may pick up some tips for making your stuff look a certain way. But that's where it ends. Design is not about a toolset or a process you can repeat for good happy success. And even if you want to concentrate your career on the animation side of the industry, you still need to have a strong foundation in design, because that's what you're going to be dealing with. Motion graphics is really the application of design principles to a film/video medium, using the techniques of film, animation, compositing, vfx, etc. So if you only understand the technique(s), you're only getting a sliver of the picture. Point being: learn the tools, but only as a way to develop the art. Otherwise, you'll be a production person, which is fine, but I get the feeling that's not your goal.

 

I want to relocate and work for a studio with other artists for collaboration, and more interesting projects with a better work environment.

Do it for the collaboration and work environment. The projects are what you make of them. You have to MAKE them interesting. That's actually a big part of your job. Find a way to take mundane stuff and help it become compelling.

 

Studio: meaning place that focuses on the creative work and projects.

vs.

Network: creative is just there to support the greater good, ie; distribution and sales

Studios put their creative work on display, but the reality for most studios is that they do a lot of crap work too. For every project that goes up on prologue.com, there might be 20 or 50 you'll never see. That's a branding move. Don't expect the studio environment to be a land of whimsy and fairy dust. Studios survive by being commercially useful, so they're oftentimes at the mercy of scared little businesspeople and their financial projections. Sometimes that's the kryptonite to creativity. One of your more valuable skills will be the ability to take the constraints given to you and turn them to your advantage. Sometimes it's the constraints that force you to make the most interesting discoveries because you can't think about a project the way you normally would. Enjoy it!

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Hey there, I agree with pretty much everything Mr. Bink says.

 

Probably the most poignant thing he mentions, and the thing to take away from this critique is the following.

 

"The projects are what you make of them. You have to MAKE them interesting. That's actually a big part of your job. Find a way to take mundane stuff and help it become compelling."

 

This is ABSOLUTELY the truth. (Well said Binky)

 

As for your reel, I think that you show promise. You have a decent sense of timing, and while your choice of music isn't my cup of tea, you aren't terrible at editing. You need to work on your typography, but I pretty much tell EVERYONE that. Mostly because motion graphics people are not always type geeks. LEARN TO BE. Type is the whole point. I would start out by changing the typeface on your intro/outro to something that doesn't look like you just used the default in illustrator. Kerning and leading and font selection need to be carefully scrutinized as an integral part of motion graphics, not just as something that "goes over top" of them. If you can master type, it will show that you are meticulous, anal retentive and snobby. These are good things.

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Now that the good critiques are out of the way, allow me to submit a snarky one:

 

Using Nickelback on your reel is like emailing a producer a knife to the ears, and who the hell wants to hire someone that just stabbed them in the ears?

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The projects are what you make of them. You have to MAKE them interesting. That's actually a big part of your job. Find a way to take mundane stuff and help it become compelling.

 

this is one of the most important things young designers can ever learn to understand. in fact, i'd say that having this ability and demonstrating it in your work is essentially the secret password to get into the career advancement speakeasy club.

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Thanks for the feedback everyone. I was thinking the same thing about using nickel back, or any song with vocals, but I didn't find anything I liked yet, and just figured I'd cut to a song I like until I find something better. Any good articles or info about music selection out there? Besides your basic reel guidelines?

 

 

on a side note, in ceramics years ago we had an assignment to make three hollow spheres out of clay, then turn in into whatever. Everyone in class basically cut them in half and added some texture and called it abstract. Being my one chance to work with clay and sculpt basically anything I wanted, I mad a meditating gorrilla about the size of a softball. To this day probably the coolest thing I did in college... "A project is what you make it"

 

with that said... maybe I should put some more time into modeling :)

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