Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Rustedhouse

C4D - Ice Texture question...

Recommended Posts

Hey Y'all...

 

been trying to recreat the ice texture found in GKaster's 'Breaking the Ice' video here:

 

Any ideas?

 

I know its procedural. I know there's a subtle displacement on it, most likely using noise. Any further ideas would help.

 

Tks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i only run a MBP for now, waiting on more horsepower, does the sub poly displacement really kick up the render times? i havent tried anything much with it, but imagine its brutal to get those nice round displacements?...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i only run a MBP for now, waiting on more horsepower, does the sub poly displacement really kick up the render times? i havent tried anything much with it, but imagine its brutal to get those nice round displacements?...

The render times do increase but it isn't a deal breaker.

 

AND...

 

I've checked out Nick C's ice tutorial, its a great tutorial and infact it is the first cause of me trying to recreate this ice effect, however that NBC cube is very diff't from GKasters, thus Campbells tut won't really get me there. Good starting point though...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The render times do increase but it isn't a deal breaker.

 

AND...

 

I've checked out Nick C's ice tutorial, its a great tutorial and in fact it is the first cause of me trying to recreate this ice effect, however that NBC cube is very diff't from GKasters, thus Campbells tut won't really get me there. Good starting point though...

 

 

Can you be more specific as to what you're trying to figure out? Have you got the bump/displacement parts figured out or are you trying to figure out the refraction, or the really organic white opaque parts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you be more specific as to what you're trying to figure out? Have you got the bump/displacement parts figured out or are you trying to figure out the refraction, or the really organic white opaque parts?

Great question, specifically...

 

-I'm trying to figure out the right amount of displacement, i'm close but not perfect

-trying to get the white opaque parts (this is huge) - thinking perhaps a layered shader with high contrast noise type that resembles chunks?

-can't get the refraction either

 

apologies for not being specific enough in advance.

 

tks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great question, specifically...

 

-I'm trying to figure out the right amount of displacement, i'm close but not perfect

-trying to get the white opaque parts (this is huge) - thinking perhaps a layered shader with high contrast noise type that resembles chunks?

-can't get the refraction either

 

apologies for not being specific enough in advance.

 

tks.

 

Are you using a banji shader or standard material? The banji has more of the glass/ice specifics and lets you specify different opacity amounts for front back and sides. In either the standard or banji, the transparency channel has the refraction index, just play with it until you get the results youre after. I suggest turning off the the other channels so you can see exactly whats going on with each nudge. Youll probably want something between 2 and 4. You could use a layered shader in the environment channel with a high contrast noise maybe stacked with a fresnel in an additive blend mode but I suspect it maybe faster to just whip open photoshop and make a bitmap for that. If you want to do it procedurally, the fire or electric noise generators would probably get you headed in the right direction.

 

You may also want to check out some of the ice, glass and water textures on c4dtextures.com to see how those were built. Don't forget that gkaster color graded that piece in after effects so you shouldn't try to match it spot on in cinema.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I highly recommend re:the refraction settings to find out the actual refraction index of whatever you're trying to emulate. When I was working on a glass marble, I knew that lampworked glass is most often borosilicate, so I did a google search for "borosilicate refraction index" and used the result as my starting point. For specific types of glass, no modification may be needed at all to achieve the desired effect (as in my case with the marble) but with your ice effect, some tweaking may be required. It is a great starting point though because the refraction setting is tough to lock down.

 

hope this helps

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...