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When to ask for a raise?

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I was curious, for motion designers and the like, who are staffed, when do you think it is appropriate to ask for a raise? And how would you determine how much more you think you deserve?

Did a search, most of these topics have come up regarding rates for freelancers.

Thanks!

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I was curious, for motion designers and the like, who are staffed, when do you think it is appropriate to ask for a raise? And how would you determine how much more you think you deserve?

Did a search, most of these topics have come up regarding rates for freelancers.

Thanks!

 

I don't think there is ever a good time to ask for a raise. Generally after a year working at any given studio you should receive some kind of raise or bonus.

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I was curious, for motion designers and the like, who are staffed, when do you think it is appropriate to ask for a raise? And how would you determine how much more you think you deserve?

Did a search, most of these topics have come up regarding rates for freelancers.

Thanks!

 

It depends on so many things that it's difficult to give a simple answer. There's no established time frame for raises, and every company has a different compensation policy. I will say that most of the raises/ promotions that I got back in my full time employee days came from pressing my bosses rather than waiting for them to come around on their own. Remember that it's not in the company's short term financial interest to pay you more than they are now for the same job, so you need to make a good business case to them. If you can demonstrate in some concrete way that you are more beneficial to the company than your salary reflects, then you have a better chance of persuading them to give you more money. Otherwise it's a very short conversation: "I think I'm worth more." "Sorry, we can't pay you more right now."

 

In general most people overvalue themselves on the job, so be careful to be objective about your relative worth. It's easy to get so worked up about "getting screwed" that you lose a sense of reality, and the simple fact that your bosses are running a business and trying to make money.

 

There's also the time tested practice of getting an offer from another company and using it as leverage with your current bosses, but this can be a minefield. If you go this route, make sure your other offer is in writing, and be prepared to leave if things don't work out with your current employer (never enter into a negotiation you can't walk away from.)

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Assuming the amount / level of business, and your duties have been the same since you started there......

What you ask for needs to be realistic. Unless your duties have changed, 5-10k jump will pretty much never happen unless you got a big promotion within a large company. If you short-sold yourself in the beginning to gain employment, you will need to just leave the company.

 

Inflation, recently increased local taxes, yearly rent increases, etc are all good data to have to base your new number on. If you have been getting the same amount for 2 years without any raises or bonuses, I would feel perfectly comfortable asking for a raise to match the cost of living differences that have developed over the past couple of years. This is generally what smaller employers expect to pay out when it comes to raises. Unless you have your employer's business by the balls (you directly bring in clients, you handle the financials, etc), you can usually only get away with a small bump. For example.. if you make $45k / year, get bumped up to $47k.

 

 

However, you can comfortably ask for a large jump if you started out entry level and have proven yourself over the last year or two. Basically, don't ask for what you don't think you could easily get elsewhere.

 

If you are at a larger company or the company has a structured review schedule, its best to wait for whats presented at those talks, and ask the question towards the end if they don't bring it up. Otherwise, it looks stinky without a serious offer from elsewhere.

 

Now, if you have "been there since the beginning", the amount of work increases, or have gained much better clients over the course of your time there, you may have a bit more weight. Same goes for if your current pay reflects when you were doing lower-level work. ie: 'the roto guy', which doesn't reflect your current duties.

Edited by AromaKat

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Thanks everyone, and just to say, I wasn't looking for like any sort of number or time, but rather what sort of factors might one be able to consider (ie cost of living, and outside influences beyond workload) and types of situations, like AromaKat described, that i was looking for. I thought this would be some good information to keep in mind and to pass around.

Thanks again everyone!

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tough time to ask for a raise, but maybe you are a junior level dude, doing mid to senior level work at a company that could afford to pay you better to keep you making them money, not sure your sittuation.

 

when i was a full timer, the only time i have gotten paid more in a significant jump was changing companies, or if youre freelancing, getting new clients. ive almost never gotten more than a token raise by asking the bosses.

 

i think its true what was said, you have to be able to walk away to negotiate compellingly. thats another reason why people in creative fields like ours have to learn to be good savers, just so youre free to turn down lame work and have more of a leg to stand on in asking for what you think is fair.

 

the other option is to be more clear with your bosses about your career goals, and ask what you have to do to move up levels. thats a way of implying you maybe want more out of the job.

 

good luck bro, go get that paper

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yea when it comes down to it you have to level with the producer and just be honest with them. honestly speaking i've never heard of anyone asking for a raise. i've only seen people negotiate upon being hired and then upping their rate when looking for a new job. i don't know how long your locked into your current studio, but i don't think it's wrong to constantly be testing the job market, and if you're a dope enough designer, there will be studios headhunting for guys like you. so always be distributing your reel to studios and letting them know your schedule (current bookings and, if you're staff, when you'll be free). don't ask for too much because there are 100 guys gunning for your spot on their call-list who will charge less.

 

in my experience most producers are on your side so don't be a dick and put them in a precarious situation by squeezing the studio too hard. if anything, they'll be the ones hooking you up when your contract is up. so even if they can't give you a raise, say thanks anyways and ask him/her to connect you to a shop that can match your rate when you leave. the budget on a job is pretty much nonnegotiable after they figure their bottom-line so it also depends on what you can bring to the plate in terms of new jobs (pitching) and taking on the responsibilities they'd hire a freelancer for.

 

but if i was you, i wouldn't ask for a raise before finding another place that'd pay you that much. what are guys in your area making anyways?

Edited by killkillakillyo

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Just do it dude. Ask.

The worst thing you can do is not say anything, hoping that someone will notice and give you a raise without asking.

You will get frustrated and seethe.

The worst thing they can do is say "no".

At least then you know where you stand, and you can realistically start looking elsewhere if you want.

Or maybe you get the raise, and still look elsewhere! :P

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