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Any beginners around here?

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I was just wondering if there are any new motion graphic designers around here. I'm calling out those who are in their 30's and not young turks who still have so much ahead of them.

 

So many new thing's have happened the past year for me. Immigrating to Canada , newly married and now considering a different career path which is of course motion design. I just turned 35 and seriously want to start a career in motion design. Of course aside from the excitement that I know I can excel in this field , this is also coupled with fear because I feel like an old dog trying to catch up with veterans and individuals who have strong media backgrounds.

 

I have no experience in media at all except for my familiarity with adobe photoshop ( to make my pictures look good ) and adobe premiere ( to document my travels ). Aside from that, my only ammunition to jumpstart this new venture is my drive to excel and the numerous possibilities that I can create with motion design.

 

So is anybody here on the same boat as I am?

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Not quite in the same boat as you but I share your fear! As long as you're prepared to put in the work then there should be no problem. Word of advice - brush up on your fine art/design skills before going mental with AE or a 3D application.

 

Good luck!

Dan

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I feel your pain bro; I've the same fear. I've invested quite a bit of time learning,

and I too at times fear I need to hurry up & get "in".

That being said a few things come to mind, and I hope I not to far off the mark.

Originality and top shelf execution trumps all.

 

A good grounding in graphic design/illustration principles might help there.

Being able to communicate (on command) via the hard wired receptivity of the brain to design gestalt is awesome!

(see Ramachandran on "The Science of Art")

 

Deconstructing pieces you like & ARTICULATING why you like them, is a good way to develop your design sense,

at least in terms of the emotional impact a particular color, texture, sequence, etc.. might have on an audience.

With this burgeoning vocabulary you can begin to speak much more powerfully

and eloquently than someone who may only know a few styles they've acquired by chance.

 

I think it's helpful to start thinking about where you'd like to end up. Where do you see yourself in the pipeline.

What studios work do you like? Can you start creating works in that vein (stylistically – not pixel copies).

 

Um,…. I think the point is get good enough to get in & keep getting better ( for yourself).

If you enjoy what your doing you'll get closer to putting yourself in a league of your own, and thus sought after.

Even the "young turks" will one day be not young, and I don't think they'll say,

" oops I'm too old for this now I better go get a normal/boring job".

 

… Walt Disney creative guy? Yeah I don't think age kills creativity.

 

My two cents.blink.gif

 

Edited by xllr8

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Thank you very much guys.

 

I've always been creative but never really pursued it because I took the "conventional" route like everybody else. Eversince I started my tutorials in AE and C4D I've been seeing things in a different light. Every corner, color, detail looks different to me now. Truly amazing!

 

Thanks again!

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In about 2004 or so I started messing around with flash, doing tutorials, and realized I could spend hours working on it in the evenings and not even care while I still queried health insurance databases during the day and watched the minutes tick by agonizingly. I went back to school for animation, and learned about all these other cool applications for animating. I really liked mograph when it finally came up in my courses.

 

I was 31 back when I graduated, and just now I'm seeing all sorts of people who are really well established in the industry just turning 30 while I'm still picking up speed and approaching 35.

 

Is it humbling? Maybe. But not if you actually think about it. So I figured out what I loved doing later in life. At least I'm doing it.

 

To quote an MC for inspiration, as I often to do

 

"Look, I've never had a dream in my life

Because a dream is what you wanna do, but still haven't pursued

I knew what I wanted and did it till it was done

So i've been the dream that I wanted to be since day one!"

I don't think I'll flip flop again though. I'm getting too old for that tongue.gif

 

One edit. Don't be opposed to a ginormous paycut to pursue what you love. It's a necessary step, trading money for fulfillment. above all the business realities of this industry,

, post_full_1280183416dollar-sign-unequals-sign-heart.jpg

Edited by planetfour

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Thank you very much guys.

 

I've always been creative but never really pursued it because I took the "conventional" route like everybody else. Eversince I started my tutorials in AE and C4D I've been seeing things in a different light. Every corner, color, detail looks different to me now. Truly amazing!

 

Thanks again!

 

I would stay away from tutorials for now, unless you're learning Illustrator/Photoshop & InDesign.

 

Go back to the basics. Time is of the essence, but if you want to be better than the rest of the pack, get good at type, composition, color, communication. If you just want to be good at animating, go ahead with the tutorials — which everyone else watches and can do.

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right up front, I would say its a young mans game, that said, talent is really the x-factor. you may have it, you may not. that is, to add concept and value to something from nothing, and to be good at figuring technical things out while not losing your ability to add communication and esthetic value

 

Honestly I would do it as a hobby for a while, and really become an observer of styles. If you have experience editing, and get lucky or have enough talent to work somewhere beside some motion graphics people, that might be good. The age thing also depends on your timeframe where you need to be journeyman level, if you have the money or sittuational security to play at it for a while, enjoy it, you will be in much better shape than if you learn andrew kramers (sometimes very inventive) techniques and end up a low end imitator/button pusher doing crap local ads. Or maybe thats fine by you, its still not a bad field to be in compared to some - the trick though, is its hard to last being anything other than well above average of who you run into in your career. so that brings me to the next point - the intangibles

 

not to be harsh, but you may not have what it takes and find that out after a few years - I wonder what happens to that high percentage of art institute grads who sucked. have you been (creatively) successful in other creative fuelds (music etc)? its a brutal field to have everything you labor on scrutinized to a ridiculously high degree - and this isnt always enlightened scrutiny. But if you are not impressing clients, you will have a steady diet of criticism until they stop hiring you - this hasnt happened to me luckily, but the PITA of the relatively heightened scrutiny (and self-scrutiny) of a days work is something i am now used to, but still feel adds one of the stresses to the career. Also, how are you under stress and dealing with people?

 

good luck, just remember the most effortless mograph you see is usually the most time consuming. and you want your stuff to look effortless, so you have to feed this thing time. for that to happen you have to believe in your ability to add something to this field, otherwise its just button pushing. you also have to factor in almost endlessly spending hours per week just keeping up your skills, or learning new things. its funny because lots of us in our 30s are starting to think of less intense ways of making a living and thinking about what job we will want to be doing at 55 (drinking on a sailboat). if you've been traveling, then you've already done some of the best stuff a person can do in life

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Wait.. Are you saying you just started doing tutorials in the past year and are considering getting into the field? Or have you been studying design / animation and are about to enter the work force?

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Thank you for all your responses.

 

silatix- To answer your question , yes, I have only started doing tutorials this year and considering entering the field.

 

mintyfresh- I appreciate your insights. You have broken down the reality of the situation even better than I see it. And I definitely agree with all your points. Designers come in all shapes and sizes. Some of the best ones didn't even go to school to learn motion design. Albeit, school is always a good foundation in developing one's methodology in whatever endeavor.

 

I have no intention to drop everything else and pursue motion design. But I do want to unleash the creative juices I have always held back because resources weren't available then.

 

I'm in no rush. But hopefully associating myself with people in the industry can help expedite my skills and knowledge.

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if you're the type of guy that watches commercials and asks himself "why'd they do that? that was stupid." then you have an eye for this stuff to some degree as our whole industry is based around broadcast and making client-work un-stupid. in my opinion, that critical eye is probably the most important thing to maintain and develop, and the first thing you lose when you start drowning yourself in tutorials and the technical side of things. it's all about storytelling and evoking emotion. if you can do that with circles and squares, then you will dominate over the guys doing high poly molecular models of the human genome. which is why most people will recommend that you not touch the technical side before you master the fundamentals, lest you find out years later when it's too late that all of your work is boring and vapid and the reason why you're unemployed.

 

being totally indoctrinated in design theory, composition, color theory, typography, etc. will give you the innate ability to make the correct/better decisions when it comes to these issues. so instead of sitting there blankly staring at the screen, wrestling with yourself to "make it better," you'll automatically recall the CONCRETE lessons you've learned. that's not to say that design is as clear cut as that, but there is bad, good, and better designs. you just have to learn how to distinguish between the three and it comes naturally once you've reiterated these lessons in your head enough - repetition.

 

or you can be like every other bonehead doing tutorials, have a eureka moment when you find out you can make cool looking shit with minimal effort, then shit out a reelful of stolen tutorial work and call it a day thinking you're ten steps ahead of everyone else. when in reality you've done yourself a disservice by attaching your name to taking credit for other people's ideas/work, and showing your low standards of what "technical proficiency" means because you were willing to make public a body of work that isn't even a tenth of a percentile what is really required to be employable in this industry. your proverbial tonal deaf-mute on american idol.

 

one last word before i wrap up this book. close the blinds, light some candles, and listen to the beaver (see my post above).

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one last word before i wrap up this book. close the blinds, light some candles, and listen to the beaver (see my post above).

 

so hot. you forgot 'remove the garments' though.

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Well you're lucky to be entering the field when there's such a well of info/tutorials out there. Do all the tutorials you can but just don't make your reel look like it was derived from tutorials and you should be working in no time :)

 

 

silatix- To answer your question , yes, I have only started doing tutorials this year and considering entering the field.

 

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Hey there Newbie, ill try to see it this way, 28 of july this month i just became 33 years young, why is that since my 25's i was in a big hurry looking around for the next big idea and the new trends that Younger guys usually brings to the stream in design rather in desktop publishing or motion graphics, I'm a graphic designer i did the whole 4 years and all, but after just 3 years working on the field i move to 3d and then to editing and now after a decade to visual fx's, but in the long long journey and i learn a lot (i wan't to think it that way), and one thing i did learn is that everyone on this field wherever is in motion design or web or vfx or editorial has a place without the age constrain, is just what can you bring to the table, your own mixture of communication skills, your personality plays a huge role here, and quite frankly ill even say that depends on the studio, or the geographical location you are on, your age can help you too, since some studios prefer a more mature person to rely on them (not that young people is irresponsible), for example i work for a advertising agency here in Aruba, and my boss is used to listen only to certain sort of person of certain age, finally this year i got in to this category because i was TOO YOUNG and i can't possible know for sure a lot of the thing i recommend even when i kill my sleeps numerous nights learning, researching and so, but after a lot of discussions and showing him on the hard way he finally accepts now that younger people can bring not only fresh design ideas but good quality solutions too. so learn everyday as it is the last day, share whatever knowledge you have with all, i can tell you, i learn a lot this way, and get a lot too, always follow a few studios or designers to learn some behind the scenes and workflows, this gives you real inside on how things are done, try to organize your ideas and make a planning of your career path, i did waste well not waste but i did invest almost 3 years learning in a scatter pattern 3ds max, modeling, lighting, rendering, animation, dynamics and i end up knowing a lot of the software but little on how to really exploit that knowledge, remember always start from the starting line, by this i mean if you want to do motion graphics learn a little or as much as you can from photography, music, history, and several other topics that would help you be more effective on your designs, then try to know what is exactly what do you want to do and just one last thing HAVE FUN without this is imho impossible to be a good designer.

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Hey there Newbie, ill try to see it this way, 28 of july this month i just became 33 years young, why is that since my 25's i was in a big hurry looking around for the next big idea and the new trends that Younger guys usually brings to the stream in design rather in desktop publishing or motion graphics, I'm a graphic designer i did the whole 4 years and all, but after just 3 years working on the field i move to 3d and then to editing and now after a decade to visual fx's, but in the long long journey and i learn a lot (i wan't to think it that way), and one thing i did learn is that everyone on this field wherever is in motion design or web or vfx or editorial has a place without the age constrain, is just what can you bring to the table, your own mixture of communication skills, your personality plays a huge role here, and quite frankly ill even say that depends on the studio, or the geographical location you are on, your age can help you too, since some studios prefer a more mature person to rely on them (not that young people is irresponsible), for example i work for a advertising agency here in Aruba, and my boss is used to listen only to certain sort of person of certain age, finally this year i got in to this category because i was TOO YOUNG and i can't possible know for sure a lot of the thing i recommend even when i kill my sleeps numerous nights learning, researching and so, but after a lot of discussions and showing him on the hard way he finally accepts now that younger people can bring not only fresh design ideas but good quality solutions too. so learn everyday as it is the last day, share whatever knowledge you have with all, i can tell you, i learn a lot this way, and get a lot too, always follow a few studios or designers to learn some behind the scenes and workflows, this gives you real inside on how things are done, try to organize your ideas and make a planning of your career path, i did waste well not waste but i did invest almost 3 years learning in a scatter pattern 3ds max, modeling, lighting, rendering, animation, dynamics and i end up knowing a lot of the software but little on how to really exploit that knowledge, remember always start from the starting line, by this i mean if you want to do motion graphics learn a little or as much as you can from photography, music, history, and several other topics that would help you be more effective on your designs, then try to know what is exactly what do you want to do and just one last thing HAVE FUN without this is imho impossible to be a good designer.

 

That was the longest run-on sentence I've ever seen.

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That was the longest run-on sentence I've ever seen.

 

Yeah, I was just remarking on it. I mean sometimes I get greedy and add too much in one line, but mine rarely wrap around more than once or twice. But wow, that one sentence was longer than some paragraphs in a Tolstoy novel. At first I was just thinking his period key was broken but then saw one at the end of the para-sentence. Impressive.

 

wait. I just found a period somewhere in the middle of it all so that has now deflated some of my previous enthusiasm :(

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right up front, I would say its a young mans game,

 

Nice ageism.

 

Not to change the subject of the thread, but it's crap like this that constantly comes out of your mouth that is the main reason I don't like you or the majority of your posts.

 

 

that said, talent is really the x-factor. you may have it, you may not. that is, to add concept and value to something from nothing, and to be good at figuring technical things out while not losing your ability to add communication and esthetic value

 

Honestly I would do it as a hobby for a while, and really become an observer of styles. If you have experience editing, and get lucky or have enough talent to work somewhere beside some motion graphics people, that might be good. The age thing also depends on your timeframe where you need to be journeyman level, if you have the money or sittuational security to play at it for a while, enjoy it, you will be in much better shape than if you learn andrew kramers (sometimes very inventive) techniques and end up a low end imitator/button pusher doing crap local ads. Or maybe thats fine by you, its still not a bad field to be in compared to some - the trick though, is its hard to last being anything other than well above average of who you run into in your career. so that brings me to the next point - the intangibles

 

not to be harsh, but you may not have what it takes and find that out after a few years - I wonder what happens to that high percentage of art institute grads who sucked. have you been (creatively) successful in other creative fuelds (music etc)? its a brutal field to have everything you labor on scrutinized to a ridiculously high degree - and this isnt always enlightened scrutiny. But if you are not impressing clients, you will have a steady diet of criticism until they stop hiring you - this hasnt happened to me luckily, but the PITA of the relatively heightened scrutiny (and self-scrutiny) of a days work is something i am now used to, but still feel adds one of the stresses to the career. Also, how are you under stress and dealing with people?

 

good luck, just remember the most effortless mograph you see is usually the most time consuming. and you want your stuff to look effortless, so you have to feed this thing time. for that to happen you have to believe in your ability to add something to this field, otherwise its just button pushing. you also have to factor in almost endlessly spending hours per week just keeping up your skills, or learning new things. its funny because lots of us in our 30s are starting to think of less intense ways of making a living and thinking about what job we will want to be doing at 55 (drinking on a sailboat). if you've been traveling, then you've already done some of the best stuff a person can do in life

 

You sound like such a douche.

Edited by tvp

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seeing as your 35 you might be better off, looking for a supervisor or manager position ie: video production "manager" (in a creative field ie: mograph, television, agency, etc). My last three bosses didn't know dick about video or motion graphics. And they make more money.

 

-I am probably way off here, but unless your the cream, or running you own studio, the pay is not very good... (still never saw that survey that was going around here)

 

-As much as I love doing what I do, I still have a lot of moments where it's same shit different day... I find that the people you work with are just as important as the work you do.

 

- With that said...When you make something your proud of... It's pretty f-ing cool!

 

-Talent is nothing more than hard work and long nights.

-when you see a little kid draw something really good and go "awe that little guy is so talented!" Little do you know there was over a hundred attempts at getting that drawing to look so good. -my 2 cents

 

more important in any field is the ability to communicate Ideas, not just be a kick ass artist.

 

I never saw myself as a creative person, more of a good problem solver. After studying art for many, many years, I realized their the same thing.

 

"And talent, I believe, is most likely to be found among nonconformists, dissenters, and rebels."...

"management cannot be expected to recognize a good idea unless it is presented to them by a good salesman."

-David Ogilvy

confessions of an advertising man

Edited by Kmksunfire

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