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jayson mark

Thinking of quiting Motion Graphics

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I have been at my current job for 6 years (hired right out of school) the pay was good and I was hopping that things would get better but it didn't. the environment here isn't very creative friendly, Its very corporate, "change the stuff cause I say so", . And my work and enthusiasm have gone down exponentially. Making me doubt my own design skills. Wondering if I need to go to LA/NY and look for better studios to work in or should I look into editing? Could your work environment effect your design skills?

Edited by jayson mark

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"Could your work environment effect your design skills?"

 

Absolutely, sounds like you need to find a new place to work. If the pay has been good, do you have any savings? Take some time off and start looking around, doing personal projects, or getting back into it by taking some online classes. Sounds like it's completely your environment. Depending where you are there could be more creative places to work or if your up for it set your sights on the major markets and do some kick ass personal projects to show off your skills without the corporate 'man' telling you to change it.

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"Could your work environment effect your design skills?"

 

Absolutely, sounds like you need to find a new place to work. If the pay has been good, do you have any savings? Take some time off and start looking around, doing personal projects, or getting back into it by taking some online classes. Sounds like it's completely your environment. Depending where you are there could be more creative places to work or if your up for it set your sights on the major markets and do some kick ass personal projects to show off your skills without the corporate 'man' telling you to change it.

 

Thanks Scofield. needed to hear that. I have close to 15k in saving. I was considering taking some online classes, as you say till dec and then take the plunge in LA next year. glad to know it may not be a very rash decision, leaving a decent paying job.

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Is your reel up? Depending on your skill level, it might behove you to jump into freelance rather then spend your savings on online classes. There's a lot to be said for 'on the job training'

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Yea, i'd think online classes would be only if you feel you don't have the portfolio to find another job or freelance work and know you don't have the motivation to do personal projects on your own time... I would definitely look for other work or take personal time first. Having the savings is good because it gives you time to figure it out rather than just take the first thing because you have to pay bills.

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Whatever you do sounds like you need to get out of that job ASAP. Is that place the only shop in town? Seems like you have plenty of options besides quitting mograph. Moving to NY/LA could be great but definitely there other places where you can find interesting work too. There is nothing like doing some personal projects to remind yourself why you like mograph and to get some non corporate work in your reel.

 

Edit:

Could your work environment effect your design skills?

 

I definitely think creativity is like a muscle, use it and you build it up, don't and it atrophies. If you challenge yourself creatively no doubt your design skills will improve.

Edited by anothername

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I would guess that maybe 5% of the industry has a job they love, but then again... perhaps only 5% of people do what they love.

You can find equally shitty and uninspiring places to work in both NY and LA.

 

I would concentrate on finding the right people... people you respect... regardless of location.

 

-m

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I would guess that maybe 5% of the industry has a job they love, but then again... perhaps only 5% of people do what they love.

You can find equally shitty and uninspiring places to work in both NY and LA.

 

I would concentrate on finding the right people... people you respect... regardless of location.

 

-m

 

No kidding. Well said.

 

I might add that just because a place does great work, it doesn't necessarily equate that they are great to work with and / or for. I know a ton of places in LA that do great work and will try and run you into the ground at every turn and / or the principals are complete assholes.

 

To be honest, I'm at a point where I don't care about how "cool" the project or projects are or how great the work is that the shop does. (As other people have mentioned, if you want to express yourself in mograph, then do a personal project.) I care about getting paid, getting paid OT, getting paid on time and how much I enjoy working with the people.

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before you seriously consider quitting, do one personal/self-promo project on your own time... do something that is really exactly the kind of thing you wish you got paid to make, not letting trends or the reel rat race influence your creative direction. then put it out there and see if anyone wants to pay you to make more stuff like that. at the very least, your reel will get a boost and you'll have finished something you're genuinely proud of. and it's not as big a risk as moving to LA, and cheaper than taking classes. hope this somehow helps.

 

also, i think it's really more like 1-2% of all people who like their jobs. and if you include the third world it's probably like 0.000000001%.

Edited by jaan

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I would concentrate on finding the right people... people you respect... regardless of location.

 

 

 

 

I care about getting paid, getting paid OT, getting paid on time and how much I enjoy working with the people.

 

 

These 2 statements hold true for me and think they are key.

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Sounds like its time to take a flying leap into the unknown, Jayson. Don't let a crappy job steal away the reality that the world out there is anyone's for the taking. Be glad you work in a free country with a TON of opportunity for the enterprising individual. Your current job sounds like its drugging you into creative hypothermia. If you don't start moving, you'll be dead soon.

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These 2 statements hold true for me and think they are key.

 

I can agree with that.

 

I would say that the best way to get and stay inspired is to make personal work, really nothing is going to be more fulfilling then doing something that you came up with and completed personally. It's always that balance of Money and Art, if your lucky you can find a company you can do both in... which is rare... so to get there you should always try to balance the two. If your really not happy with what your doing just leave, and find a place that seems to make you happier, but you shouldn't give up something you've put your life into just because of one company and the work your currently doing.

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Finding a job with people who are cool and who respect you and vice versa is not exactly something you can research. Luckily, freelancing allows you to jump around and try out a lot of different studios to see what kind of vibe you like better. There are plenty of unpleasant places, but you're not always going to hear about it beforehand. Places like NY and LA make it easier for freelancers to find good studios simply because there are so many to choose from. As your choices are narrowed so are your chances of finding happiness in the workplace. As long as you have marketable skills, you'll be able to find a job that makes you happy providing you don't settle. I don't know about monkey's 5% statistic. I think mograph is generally a much more rewarding line of work than many others. You get paid to make pretty pictures. As long as you're not being taken advantage of while doing this, what's not to be overjoyed by?

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Speaking personally, I'm a week away from leaving a comfortable, well paid job as a senior graphic designer to become a motion designer for another agency. I've been there for three and a half years and am totally in my comfort zone. I love (most) the people, but it just isn't as creatively stimulating any more.

 

Sometimes you just have to take the chance and see how it turns out. There's that quote about regretting more what you haven't done rather than what you have.

 

At the moment I'm 100% convinced it's the right thing. We'll see how it goes, but I won't regret moving on; creativity is the most important thing for me without a doubt.

 

Birdy

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Finding a job with people who are cool and who respect you and vice versa is not exactly something you can research. Luckily, freelancing allows you to jump around and try out a lot of different studios to see what kind of vibe you like better. There are plenty of unpleasant places, but you're not always going to hear about it beforehand. Places like NY and LA make it easier for freelancers to find good studios simply because there are so many to choose from. As your choices are narrowed so are your chances of finding happiness in the workplace. As long as you have marketable skills, you'll be able to find a job that makes you happy providing you don't settle. I don't know about monkey's 5% statistic. I think mograph is generally a much more rewarding line of work than many others. You get paid to make pretty pictures. As long as you're not being taken advantage of while doing this, what's not to be overjoyed by?

 

I don't know Mete, I feel like most shops these days, in LA at least, are trying to take advantage of the freelancer, one way or the other. Mostly in the realm of over time compensation, timely payment and correct tax classification to the IRS. There are so many people looking for work right now, that for the most part the industry is still full of labor abuse.

Edited by tvp

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If you don't start moving, you'll be dead soon.

 

This is very true and one needs to be very careful not to let this happen. I have been there, and it ain't pretty.

 

Hello to everyone...I'm [sort of] new to the board (I was on here years ago...I think I used to be a "Mograph Superstar" back in '03) and wanted to chime in on this topic.

 

I was in a mind-numbing design job that all but killed my spirit a few years ago. It completely soured me on design, so I've spent about two years working in a completely different field. I'm only now even trying to get back into anything creative.

 

Just don't do what I did and stay in the job for too long. I should have left and found something better, but I just didn't think there was anything out there, or that I had a change of getting a decent motion job as a newb. (I did a lot of print and illustration.) It's really a terrible way to go about things, being that passive about your work. Dostoyevsky said it best: "Deprived of meaningful work, men and women lose their reason for existence; they go stark, raving mad."

 

Nice to be back. I'll keep my residual madness to a minimum.

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If you have a little cash saved up tell your employer that you're burnt out and that you need a vacation and then take a real vacation, go camping or head out of town for a couple of weeks. If your employer gives you shit about it they don't really want to keep you and they don't really respect you and it's definitely time to move on. When you get back you'll have a clear head and can figure out what you want to do. If you start missing your wacom tablet when you're gone you should stick with mograph.

 

I was an editor previously and had plenty of good paying work but made the switch because of the types of editing jobs that I was getting.

 

Editing videos of corporate sales managers pumping up their sales force will make you want to work at taco bell.

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I was thinking the same thing in 2006, but only with graphic design. I personally decided to go back to school. I only had an associates degree in graphic design. So school wouldn't hurt. I'm now about to graduate in spring with a bachelors degree in VFX and motion graphics.

 

The print shop I worked at was great the first 2 years. I learned a lot and then a few years went by and the work we got was all crap, it was alot of basic business card, letter heads, and envelopes. Boring work! My creativity went down with it. I doubted my work too. My suggestion would be take a vacation first. Have some fun! You need to think positive and get in a good mind set, you are a creative person or you would not be in this field. We all have creativity in us. Do some freelance work on the side if you want or do some personal projects. These will get the creative juices flowing. If your not happy with your job, start looking around. It can't hurt. The good thing is you identified the problem. Don't let your creativity suffer. Like someone said your creativity is like a muscle. If you don't use it, it goes away. Good luck in your decision.

Edited by secretninja

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Your work will definitely suffer if the work environment is poor. I recently left a company for that exact reason. They did not understand the turnaround required of motion graphics. They expected me to go from concept to delivery within one day sometimes. While that is possible, it is not ideal, and I did not feel that my work was everything it could be. So I went somewhere else.

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