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Hello.

 

I am a Motion Designer currently living in the San Francisco Bay Area. I will be moving to Brooklyn in October and would love to hear from anyone that has done the same thing or from residents that could offer me some advice.

 

Good neighborhoods in Brooklyn?

Should I join the freelancers union?

Staffing agencies?

Any anything else you'd like to share

 

Thanks!

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Hello.

 

I am a Motion Designer currently living in the San Francisco Bay Area. I will be moving to Brooklyn in October and would love to hear from anyone that has done the same thing or from residents that could offer me some advice.

 

Good neighborhoods in Brooklyn?

Should I join the freelancers union?

Staffing agencies?

Any anything else you'd like to share

 

Thanks!

 

i think themonkey lives in bk.

 

if you're good enough you don't need a staffing agency. unless your reel is heavily dependent on particular and shine your time would be better spent making contacts that count.

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brooklyn is where its at.. just try to keep close to manhattan to cut down on commuting time. live near the L, F, J, M lines..

 

staffing agencies can be ok.. just avoid creative circle since they rip you off

 

freelancers union is good i guess.. im not super happy with my insurance package with them though

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Ha, you're replicating my move from 3 years ago! Worked in SF for Current TV, quit and moved back to freelance in NYC.

 

I'd only go with a staffing agency if you have a lot of trouble finding freelance work. NYC is nothing like SF in terms of market. There are tons of studios, and even in this dour economy, there's a lot of gigs.

 

My first few gigs I got through job listings on this board and on Motionographer. The best studios to send your reel (by email of course) are places that are explicitly looking for freelancers. Next are any studios that are listed on Motiongrapher's cream or on MographWiki where you might luck out randomly but generally will pass over emails looking for work unless your name is someone they recognize. Eventually I built up some connections, either at the places I worked at, or friends I made in the city and started getting work on a referral basis. Has been that way since then. It's a bit of a challenge to get into the swing of things, but if you've got a good reel and have made a few useful friends you shouldn't have much trouble.

 

As silatix said, being next to the train is key. Commuting by bike is always an option, but you won't be using a bike every single day. Best to not have to walk 15 minutes to get to a good train. (or god forbid, take a bus)

 

I used FU for a while before going full time. It's decent. For the price, I don't think there's a better deal out there.

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Ha, you're replicating my move from 3 years ago! Worked in SF for Current TV, quit and moved back to freelance in NYC.

 

I'd only go with a staffing agency if you have a lot of trouble finding freelance work. NYC is nothing like SF in terms of market. There are tons of studios, and even in this dour economy, there's a lot of gigs.

 

My first few gigs I got through job listings on this board and on Motionographer. The best studios to send your reel (by email of course) are places that are explicitly looking for freelancers. Next are any studios that are listed on Motiongrapher's cream or on MographWiki where you might luck out randomly but generally will pass over emails looking for work unless your name is someone they recognize. Eventually I built up some connections, either at the places I worked at, or friends I made in the city and started getting work on a referral basis. Has been that way since then. It's a bit of a challenge to get into the swing of things, but if you've got a good reel and have made a few useful friends you shouldn't have much trouble.

 

As silatix said, being next to the train is key. Commuting by bike is always an option, but you won't be using a bike every single day. Best to not have to walk 15 minutes to get to a good train. (or god forbid, take a bus)

 

I used FU for a while before going full time. It's decent. For the price, I don't think there's a better deal out there.

 

 

Thanks Mete-Shop,

 

I love the Bay Area but the scene here is pretty small and I feel there isn't much room for growth.

 

I spent that past week sending out e-mails to companies and so far four studios have expressed interest in hiring me as a freelancer once I get into town. I am hoping one of them will book me so when I get there I can start working right away. So I definitely lucked out so far with that. If you were in my position would you concentrate on communicating with these four companies and try to get on of them to book you? Or would you continue sending out e-mails?

 

I am definitely looking for places near the subway though especially since I won't have my bike with me when I go to check out sublets in a couple of weeks.

 

I never see anybody talk about their rates on this forum. If you don't mind I'd be stoked if you took a look at my reel and maybe give me an idea on what I should charge in NYC.

 

Thanks again for the advice

 

 

 

 

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In terms of who to email: email everyone. Focus on the studios that have hit you back obviously, but bust your ass to get your name out there as much as you can.

 

I wouldn't accept less than $500/day. I feel like studios may be asking for lower rates due to the economy but anything below $500 is under-selling yourself.

 

 

And make sure to stop by the next time we have a mograph meetup! We usually have one the first week every month.

 

http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=130122690367634&index=1#!/group.php?gid=96841632074

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In terms of who to email: email everyone. Focus on the studios that have hit you back obviously, but bust your ass to get your name out there as much as you can.

 

I wouldn't accept less than $500/day. I feel like studios may be asking for lower rates due to the economy but anything below $500 is under-selling yourself.

 

 

And make sure to stop by the next time we have a mograph meetup! We usually have one the first week every month.

 

http://www.facebook....gid=96841632074

 

 

I look forward to attending Mograph NYC! And thanks again for all of the advice.

 

 

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Any Brooklyn neighborhood is a good Brooklyn neighborhood. There are a million of them that all sort of blend together around the edges. Study up a bit on their traditional ethnic make-ups as well (ie. Greenpoint= Polish, Bushwick=Hispanic, CrownHghts=Carribean)...

 

Here is a generalization of the radius you should stick to with a rough rent estimate. Anything further would be too long of a commute, or not as comfortable or safe when first getting acclimated...

 

Are you:

 

Creative young yuppie-ish who makes good money and likes nice safe blocks of treelined streets and restaurants?

(Parkslope, Ft.Greene, Boreum Hill, Cobble Hill, Carrol Gardens) 1bedrooms around $1800-2400/month

 

Creative Hipster-ish who likes to party, rock music, bars, but still safe?

(Williamsburg, Bushwick, E.Williamsburg, Greenpoint) or anywhere along the first four L-stops, the further the L stop, the cheaper the rent. $1500-2400/month

 

Or if you don't mind a bit more commute, still safe-ish, cheaper rent, fringe neighborhoods...

(Clinton Hill, Gowanus, South Slope, Prospect Heights, Lefferts Garden) $1300-2000/month

 

Poor artist, who doesn't mind being in a more diverse culture, not as good grocery stores, and maybe a little sketchy after midnight?

(Bed Stuy, Crown Heights) $1000-1500/month

 

 

Just my 2cents.

 

 

 

 

Freelancing can be a little intimidating, but not too hard if you're good. Send your website/reel to every company you can think of, work hard, and be nice. Post your reel here and send it to motionographer in hopes they can bump it as a quickie. Save up some money before the move.

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Any Brooklyn neighborhood is a good Brooklyn neighborhood. There are a million of them that all sort of blend together around the edges. Study up a bit on their traditional ethnic make-ups as well (ie. Greenpoint= Polish, Bushwick=Hispanic, CrownHghts=Carribean)...

 

Here is a generalization of the radius you should stick to with a rough rent estimate. Anything further would be too long of a commute, or not as comfortable or safe when first getting acclimated...

 

Are you:

 

Creative young yuppie-ish who makes good money and likes nice safe blocks of treelined streets and restaurants?

(Parkslope, Ft.Greene, Boreum Hill, Cobble Hill, Carrol Gardens) 1bedrooms around $1800-2400/month

 

Creative Hipster-ish who likes to party, rock music, bars, but still safe?

(Williamsburg, Bushwick, E.Williamsburg, Greenpoint) or anywhere along the first four L-stops, the further the L stop, the cheaper the rent. $1500-2400/month

 

Or if you don't mind a bit more commute, still safe-ish, cheaper rent, fringe neighborhoods...

(Clinton Hill, Gowanus, South Slope, Prospect Heights, Lefferts Garden) $1300-2000/month

 

Poor artist, who doesn't mind being in a more diverse culture, not as good grocery stores, and maybe a little sketchy after midnight?

(Bed Stuy, Crown Heights) $1000-1500/month

 

 

Just my 2cents.

 

 

 

 

Freelancing can be a little intimidating, but not too hard if you're good. Send your website/reel to every company you can think of, work hard, and be nice. Post your reel here and send it to motionographer in hopes they can bump it as a quickie. Save up some money before the move.

 

Thanks for all of the kick ass info Douglas!

 

will keep looking for a place and hopefully something will work for us. =)

 

 

 

 

 

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I dont mean to hijack this thread so I will keep this short and on point. (BTW Congrats on making the big move to NYC seems very exciting!)

 

I am noticing the numbers you all are throwing out there for daily rates as a freelancer, $500-$600/day. Is this pretty wide spread for someone of Chris's level?

Or just the standard in NYC for a talented artist?

 

I ask because I am still in school and very new to the industry and am curious to know more about how all this work etc.

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I dont mean to hijack this thread so I will keep this short and on point. (BTW Congrats on making the big move to NYC seems very exciting!)

 

I am noticing the numbers you all are throwing out there for daily rates as a freelancer, $500-$600/day. Is this pretty wide spread for someone of Chris's level?

Or just the standard in NYC for a talented artist?

 

I ask because I am still in school and very new to the industry and am curious to know more about how all this work etc.

 

It all depends on your skill level.

 

 

 

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It's $500 and up. $500 is low. A mid level designer should be charging more. Don't go crazy, mind, but ask for a healthy amount. You might get bargained down, but at least you asked.

 

Thanks Mete for all of the info. I just got back from NYC. I had a good time. We found a nice little spot in Ft. Greene and moving in on the 1st of October. In a thread about holds you mentioned that you should always use yourself as the first hold. I was wondering if you could talk a little bit about that.

 

thanks again

 

 

 

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Simply put, don't give out first holds. If a company wants to put you on hold for a period, give them a second hold regardless of whether or not you have a first. That way, if they want to book you they'll need to challenge your 1st 'hold' and commit to the booking rather than lead you along until a few days before the booking starts and drop you. Not that this won't happen if they're your second hold, but with the second hold strategy you can are less dependent on one company for work. It's a more cynical strategy, but freelancing forces this hand. Most of the time studios have to wait 'til the last minute to find out whether they've been awarded a gig, thus comes getting dropped at the last minute. You just have to adapt by taking a shrewd stance toward holds and not taking them terribly seriously. That being said, if you get booked or agree to a first hold, stick with it, or talk to the producer about why you want to get out of it. Don't just bounce as that will reflect poorly on your dependability and bad word gets around quickly.

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This may be a stupid question, but I'm still in school for Motion Graphics. Can you explain what a hold is and what the reference to the second hold is? "If a company wants to put you on hold for a period, give them a second hold regardless of whether or not you have a first." I'm assuming the hold is when a company puts you on a standby for a gig. Thanks:)

 

Simply put, don't give out first holds. If a company wants to put you on hold for a period, give them a second hold regardless of whether or not you have a first. That way, if they want to book you they'll need to challenge your 1st 'hold' and commit to the booking rather than lead you along until a few days before the booking starts and drop you. Not that this won't happen if they're your second hold, but with the second hold strategy you can are less dependent on one company for work. It's a more cynical strategy, but freelancing forces this hand. Most of the time studios have to wait 'til the last minute to find out whether they've been awarded a gig, thus comes getting dropped at the last minute. You just have to adapt by taking a shrewd stance toward holds and not taking them terribly seriously. That being said, if you get booked or agree to a first hold, stick with it, or talk to the producer about why you want to get out of it. Don't just bounce as that will reflect poorly on your dependability and bad word gets around quickly.

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maybe I can use this old thread for some info, also looking at making a move no nyc. Can anyone recommend cheaper niehborhoods, lol. more like 800=1,000?

don't mind a 30-40min commutue... looking to commute to central park area?

 

ps. I don't really know anything about new york, never been...

Edited by Kmksunfire

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If you have roomates.. You can pay that almost anywhere.. If you want to live alone, then maybe.. Hmm.. Somewhere far off like sunset park or ridgewood

 

maybe I can use this old thread for some info, also looking at making a move no nyc. Can anyone recommend cheaper niehborhoods, lol. more like 800=1,000?

don't mind a 30-40min commutue... looking to commute to central park area?

 

ps. I don't really know anything about new york, never been...

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maybe I can use this old thread for some info, also looking at making a move no nyc. Can anyone recommend cheaper niehborhoods, lol. more like 800=1,000?

don't mind a 30-40min commutue... looking to commute to central park area?

 

ps. I don't really know anything about new york, never been...

 

I'm used to live in Bushwick for 600 bucks a month. I had 2 roommates that were cool and it was right next to the JMZ.

But realistically having your own place in NYC is really pricey and for the small amount of time I'm actually home having roommates isn't so bad

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Yeah, I don't see peoples problems with room mates. Obviously sometimes you get some bad ones, but generally who wants to come home to an empty apartment?

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thanks for the feedback. I have a roommate now, and pay around 500 a month(outside of milwaukee), and am barely living comfortably... I think I have an idea in my head, but would anybody like to throw out suggestions, on what would be a salary range to ask for? I'm thinking that I should be able to get a bump if I'm willing to move to NYC. Been with company over 6 years. I'm a ""senior"Designer/Animator"

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Yeah, I don't see peoples problems with room mates. Obviously sometimes you get some bad ones, but generally who wants to come home to an empty apartment?

If your apt is only 500 sq. ft... you might prefer coming home to an empty apt. ;)

 

-m

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If your apt is only 500 sq. ft... you might prefer coming home to an empty apt. ;)

 

-m

 

Mike please tell me your new apartments bigger than 500 sq. ft ;)

 

And Kmksunfire ... Don't take anything less than 50k ... then again fulltime jobs are harder to come by in NYC so you might wanna consider freelance

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