Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Uncle_Pinny

Some advice on a new computer for CS5/C4D

Recommended Posts

I'm in the process of speccing some new machines for our department. Currently we're struggling with Dual Cores and CS3 /C4D / Maya.

 

We do motion graphics for film and tv focussing on movie trailers etc. Lots of HD and 2k stuff. The majority of the work is in AE and 3d is taken care of with Maya and C4D.

 

The idea is to upgrade to CS5 and carry on the 3d in C4D and Maya.

 

Ideally I'd like to leave PC's behind and go Apple but realistically I don't think the budget is there for that so it's going to stay PC based.

 

I'm looking at the following sort of spec:

 

Intel i7 980x Extreme 3.33 cpu (6 core/12 thread) - Will AE be able to use all threads like C4D?

12gb RAM

ATI Fire Pro V5800

SSD boot drive

 

I'd like as much bang for my buck as possible and would really love to get something that renders fast as well as being fast to work on. I can't see my budget stretching to dual XEON's but maybe it could gif I go for 2 x slower Xeons (8 core/16 thread total).

 

Any advice or suggestions?? Should I maybe wo with NVidia instead of ATI due to them supporting CUDA? Or is that only relevant for Premiere? Any other things to take into account

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

instead of going for dual or whatever. Get each guy 2 systems. So one can be rendering while they work on the other one. Much more bang for buck.

 

Over the years i find that $1000 per system blocks generally gives you most cost efficient system. paying $3000 for a system will give you maybe 25% boost max, much better to buy 3 systems if you are going to be spending that much. and then each user can have a mini render farm =)

 

if you got for dual xeons, then you can go for a mac pro they are surprisingly cheap.

 

But before switching to mac consider if all the plugins for your software are available.

 

my 2c.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the input.

 

The 2 system per person idea isn't really feasible for a variety of reasons but I appreciate the idea. The way our workflow is setup it wouldn't really suit and would open up the very realistic scenario of 'spare machines' being fair game for others in the company (it would happen).

 

Yeah - I think Mac Pro's are good value for what they are but they do represent a jump in price from a mid range single processor setup.

 

There seems to be a lack of info for decent single processor set ups which is frustrating. The idea with me going that route is that I will be able to get a decent rig with SSD boot drive, mid range 3d specific card for around the £2800 (excluding VAT).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There seems to be a lack of info for decent single processor set ups which is frustrating. The idea with me going that route is that I will be able to get a decent rig with SSD boot drive, mid range 3d specific card for around the £2800 (excluding VAT).

 

By single processor you do mean cpu not cores, correct?

If so try over here CG Society and here C4D Cafe.

good luck

mdr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Intel i7 980x Extreme 3.33 cpu (6 core/12 thread) - Will AE be able to use all threads like C4D?

12gb RAM

ATI Fire Pro V5800

SSD boot drive

 

I would suggest the following:

 

- Intel i7 980x Extreme 3.33 cpu - Good choice, and AE will be able to use most threads when rendering. It still doesn't use them as efficiently as C4D, but it will use them. Do some Googling on the matter if you really want to get into the nitty gritty of how it works.

- 12gb Ram - Probably a good amt for your budget. Good amt of ram overall.

- Nvidia graphics card - If you use premiere at all, you'll be able to take advantage of the CUDA acceleration for playback & rendering

- Regualar hard drive - SSD will only help your speed in certain instances, and it's going to wreck your budget. Wait for cheaper bigger SSD drives in the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Currently, by far the best workstation you can build:

 

1 x EVGA Classified SR-2 Motherboard (Dual socket and intended for overclocking)

 

2 x Intel Xeon X5650 factory clock'd at 2.66Ghz (6 cores each but based on 32nm technology)

 

1 x Kingston HyperX 12GB (3 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM

 

So far, this right here will set you back $3100. So for around $4000, you can have a pretty solid machine. Since this motherboard is meant for overclocking, you can have yourself a 12 core / 24 thread workstation that can run 24/7 @ 4.0Ghz. As a comparison, let's take the latest 12 core / 24 thread MAC Pro running @ 2.93Ghz, its Cinebench result is around 15.1 and this beast can reach 20. That's 25% more juice for less dough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Currently, by far the best workstation you can build:

 

1 x EVGA Classified SR-2 Motherboard (Dual socket and intended for overclocking)

 

2 x Intel Xeon X5650 factory clock'd at 2.66Ghz (6 cores each but based on 32nm technology)

 

1 x Kingston HyperX 12GB (3 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM

 

So far, this right here will set you back $3100. So for around $4000, you can have a pretty solid machine. Since this motherboard is meant for overclocking, you can have yourself a 12 core / 24 thread workstation that can run 24/7 @ 4.0Ghz. As a comparison, let's take the latest 12 core / 24 thread MAC Pro running @ 2.93Ghz, its Cinebench result is around 15.1 and this beast can reach 20. That's 25% more juice for less dough.

 

Forgot to mention, if the money is a bit tight, I'd replace the X5650(s) with E5620 (4 cores) and that will save you $1300. You can reach around 3.6 ~ 3.8Ghz with the E5620(s).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Currently, by far the best workstation you can build:

 

1 x EVGA Classified SR-2 Motherboard (Dual socket and intended for overclocking)

 

2 x Intel Xeon X5650 factory clock'd at 2.66Ghz (6 cores each but based on 32nm technology)

 

1 x Kingston HyperX 12GB (3 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM

 

So far, this right here will set you back $3100. So for around $4000, you can have a pretty solid machine. Since this motherboard is meant for overclocking, you can have yourself a 12 core / 24 thread workstation that can run 24/7 @ 4.0Ghz. As a comparison, let's take the latest 12 core / 24 thread MAC Pro running @ 2.93Ghz, its Cinebench result is around 15.1 and this beast can reach 20. That's 25% more juice for less dough.

 

 

Man, I have had 4 EVGA cards to date, all of which have died. I couldn't fathom actually paying that company $600 for a motherboard.

 

Edit: And after looking at the first review on Newegg.... I am completely unsurprised.

Edited by misanthrope.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man, I have had 4 EVGA cards to date, all of which have died. I couldn't fathom actually paying that company $600 for a motherboard.

 

Edit: And after looking at the first review on Newegg.... I am completely unsurprised.

 

I actually never owned an EVGA board myself but at the moment, there is no other alternative to this board. I've seen a lot of people that own this board and are completely satisfied. This board is a little above my pay grade but if I had the dough, I would definitely buy one of these with the XEON(s) over Core i7 980x any day of the week.

 

Core i7 980x paired with a decent board will be around $1300. 2 x E5620 + EVGA SR-2 will be around the same but you'll gain 2 more physical cores and 4 more threads.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

SSD boot drive

 

Instead of a SSD drive, you might want to look into a 10,000 rpm raptor drive. They arn't quite as expensive as the SSD's but are still pretty quick.

Edited by ynaka

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Instead of a SSD drive, you might want to look into a 10,000 rpm raptor drive. They arn't quite as expensive as the SSD's but are still pretty quick.

 

Thanks for all the advice. It's been useful.

 

I'm hoping a ssd boot drive will just add an extra bit of zip when moving around programs rather than affecting work. We actually work from a server anyway which kind of bottlenecks our render speeds somewhat. As for over clocking CPUs I'm not sure i could do that. Bear in mind this may invalidate our warranty and service agreements that we may have. Id definitely have to look into that before going that route.

 

If i went the route of the 3.33 extreme i7 do you think it would be worth pushing the ram up to 16 gb? I know now things are 64bit i can actually utilize all that extra memory. Given we do work from a server maybe I could downgrade things from ssd to the raptor and use the extra cash to bump up the memory.

 

Thanks again for all your input.

 

P.s. Thanks for the dual xeon recommendation but in the uk my budget is really not going to be able to get near that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So it looks like my bosses have decided it's worth going the Mac Pro route instead. Which is great for me as I love OSX.

 

Anyone have any experience with the 8 core 2010s? Is the HD Radeon 5770 good enough for AE and C4D work?

 

I'm trying to get them to push them up to 12GB machines from the stock 6GB - worth it?

 

Thanks for the input guys.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just bought a bunch of new stuff - Mac Pro (the outgoing 8-core 2.66ghz), more RAM (it has 24GB now) and Adobe CS5.

 

For C4D, RAM doesn't matter all that much, but if you're having millions of polys you benefit, while working, from a better GPU. For AE, the GPU is less important but the RAM is much more so. You basically cannot use all your cores unless you have about 2-4GB per THREAD.

 

I've also found that RAM Previewing with multi-processing works a lot better in CS5 than CS4. For me this is the major improvement in CS5 - I now have MP turned on all the time whereas I used to only use it for rendering.

 

Currently the 2010 Mac Pro Hexacore represents a bit of a sweet spot but beware as it only has 4 RAM slots so you'd be best off buying 4 x the 8GB sticks of RAM (You cannot mix the 8GB sticks with other sizes). And those sticks are more expensive per GB.

 

In my opinion the BEST option right now is the outgoing 2.66 or, even better, 2.93 8-cores. The 2.66 is marginally faster than the new Hex and the 2.93 is faster PLUS you can save a little money on 4GB RAM sticks which should more than cover the cost of the new Radeon 5770 from Apple. And the 5870 should be available soon. Nvidia are releasing a mac Quadro next month too, apparently. The are some threads on Macrumors with links to retailers but I guess stock is running low, esp on the 2.93's.

 

Edit: When i say outgoing I mean the 2009 models.

Edited by kitkats

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For AE, the GPU is less important but the RAM is much more so. You basically cannot use all your cores unless you have about 2-4GB per THREAD.

 

 

For real???

 

Jeez....

 

Actually I was getting some problems on my i7 imac at home when trying to use all cores with 1gb per thread (12gb machine).

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For real???

 

Jeez....

 

Actually I was getting some problems on my i7 imac at home when trying to use all cores with 1gb per thread (12gb machine).

 

The GPU in AE comes into it's own when you use OpenGL. Most people I know turn OpenGL off altogether and use Adaptive Resolution because OpenGL is kind of flaky. Might be a different story with Windows, I wouldn't know about that. Todd mentioned a while ago about GB of RAM per Thread, but it depends on the project some are more RAM heavy than others.

 

I was working on a 2009 Mac Pro a while ago and it was painfully slow to render and generally hung up a lot. I think the issue was mainly due to lack of RAM and it running CS4. Since I got my own machine with CS5 and the 24GB, it flies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just built a SR-2 & 2 x Intel Xeon E5620 (2.4Ghz) based system for a client and pretty much overclocked it to 3.8Ghz within a day.

 

8 cores / 16 threads running @ 3.8Ghz with 24GB RAM + Nvidia GeForce GTX 470 + 128GB SSD for OS + 3TB (RAID 5) of storage space. Now that's what you call a budget monster workstation ($4000 worth of hardware). Take a look at the attached screen. I'm scoring 13.01pts in Cinebench R11.5.

 

Basically this machine is waaaayyyy faster than a 8 core 2.93Ghz Mac Pro that would cost $7500. Also, it's almost on par with 12 core 2.66Ghz Mac Pro, which would cost around $9500.

 

14.03 ($9500) > 13.01 ($4000) > 10.7 ($7500)

 

70360048.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldnt get an ATI card.

 

all the recent adobe stuff uses nvidia cards for acceleration as far as i know.

 

same for cinema, doesnt play well with ATI.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...