Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
highfive

Motion Design as a Career?

Recommended Posts

Interesting thread. Similar to many others, I appreciated Monovich's succinct post which I can certainly relate to my own career at the moment, particularly the NDA stuff which is becoming a real pain.

 

Monovich's post made me wonder whether youngsters can over-think their careers to the point of paralysis. (*Reminds me of AA Milne's 'The Old Sailor' - "But he never could think what he ought to do first."*) I would tell my own sons to work hard at something you enjoy. Working hard WILL create opportunities. TAKE opportunities! Don't think too far ahead about whether it's your ideal career path or not. You need to be flexible and carve your own path.

 

I'm approaching my 40s and it's NOW that I feel like I really need to be on the ball in terms of making plans, setting targets,etc. But I feel like I have a reasonably healthy career: I supplement my own studio work with freelancing but actually it's quite a good way of keeping yourself visible. Working in a small studio can be quite isolating. I love change so generally whichever I'm doing more of then I want to be doing more of the other!

 

I also liked levante's post about regulating your hours in your 30s - it's definitely possible. I think it's good for youngsters to work silly hours - think of it more as fast-track training and experience. But with experience, you can nearly always get work done on time. If people are working all hours then something is going wrong. As levante said, as long as you get your work done on time then clients don't mind. I also set a margin of time into the day so although I'm paid to work 9-6, I'll work until 7 before starting to charge overtime. It just helps to avoid the appearance that you're clock-watching and desperate to get home which might get you a reputation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A Career is something you have for life. You can only work in mograph until about 40 then you are done. Out to pasture as a second string CD with an ex-wife and a kid you missed grow up or you become a Producer with a drinking problem and a thing for young girls.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This podcast has a lot of great info. https://soundcloud.com/the-collective-podcast

 

Summary:

 

Put in the Practice. 10,000 hour rule to get good.

 

Work with people Better than you.

 

Freelance at crazy hard places and get an awesome reel / portfolio.

 

Set up an S-Corp and Legal shit.

 

Never do Holds only do Bookings.

 

Save up 6 month of $$$

 

Bust ass for as long as you can then become a director or business owner or teach.

 

That is a career in mograph.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been working as a motion designer for about three years effectively , I have a grown a lot as an artist since then and I'm 29 , earning that 40K a year and I was just offered a job at a studio doing more creative stuff for advertising , gaming and films . The thing is right before I got this offere I was really bored with my current job and very demotivated , I have only been at it for about two years but I just felt like I hit the threshold , I just hated it and I knew it was time to evolve into something better than just broadcast stuff.

I have felt the same way about my previous job too and the thing is if you are really good and you know your good eventually you will be looking to move up the food chain like someone said and you would be looking for more creative freedom and challenge and this is where it gets hard because when you are at the bottom people don't mind you going up a level or two but when the higher you get the stronger you "Boss" will be and the harder it will be for him to roll over and let you take his place.

Patience and a good game plan are key tobyour success , its easy to get discoyraged with all the beautiful stuff you see on vimeo that you aren't doing but be patient and always learn ... at the end that is what seperates you and makes you worth what you are being paid ... educated decissions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been working as a motion designer for about three years effectively , I have a grown a lot as an artist since then and I'm 29 , earning that 40K a year and I was just offered a job at a studio doing more creative stuff for advertising , gaming and films . The thing is right before I got this offere I was really bored with my current job and very demotivated , I have only been at it for about two years but I just felt like I hit the threshold , I just hated it and I knew it was time to evolve into something better than just broadcast stuff.

I have felt the same way about my previous job too and the thing is if you are really good and you know your good eventually you will be looking to move up the food chain like someone said and you would be looking for more creative freedom and challenge and this is where it gets hard because when you are at the bottom people don't mind you going up a level or two but when the higher you get the stronger you "Boss" will be and the harder it will be for him to roll over and let you take his place.

Patience and a good game plan are key tobyour success , its easy to get discoyraged with all the beautiful stuff you see on vimeo that you aren't doing but be patient and always learn ... at the end that is what seperates you and makes you worth what you are being paid ... educated decissions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i love this thread, it keeps coming up and you see what you posted 2 years ago :)

 

I really like monovich's post.

 

But what people miss here, is this applies to any career. unless you make yourself valuable, you are going to be a commodity. You can be a lawyer and accountant, a taxi driver. If you want to move up you need to make yourself valuable.

 

I have no problem with doing technical stuff. Clients value me for my technical skills because i work faster than the average freelancer. And they come to me when they have a tight deadline, and i save their ass =). I enjoy being the guy that gets called on to clean up a mess.

 

 

I am curious, how now years later people see the industry at large though. Do people still think they can't animate past 30/40?

 

I ask this, because i got into managing other artists taking a more management type role. But i realised that i missed actually doing the work. There was too much stuff that i didn't want to do. I don't want to deal with end clients. I want to work with people who know what they are doing. I want to deal with people who appreciate my skills and don't look around for someone cheaper.

 

I recently came back from a pretty solid 2 years of alcohol abuse, and now thinking of what to move towards next. Started doing personal projects again. I really missed just playing with c4d when it wasn't work related.

 

here's a bear for you all =)

j4GfsaN6nDdUw.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It gets frustrating to keepdoing this after you're forty or so I guess , I'm not sure though I am still 29 though and although I don't mind animating I'm not that tolerant of the clients or comments in general on my work specially ones that might require me to redo all the work

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok so as someone who went freelance from a well paid paid and secure very creative job when he was 39, i guess i should go and shoot myself now, as i am past it.....

...however for some reason i feel more energised now, i work across a couple of creative disciplines including mograph, and can see this developing as i get older, i went freelance to maximise my potential (and earnings) as well as see more of the kids, and so far so good. I seem to get work because as other have said age comes with experience and efficiency, and maybe more if a desire to understand and work with the client.

The other thing is that this industry is growing with us, and will continue to adapts as the old farts get older and the clients still want to work with them becuase they get the job done.....i hope!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very interesting to read these thoughts indeed. I have been involved in "mograph" for about 8-9 years now and have transitioned from originally working JR/production roles to a senior designer/animator in charge to project, then to a freelancer and finally (or currently finally) to owning my own company in Denver. I think that I relate much to Monovich;s posting where at some point you need to set yourself up for the next step. I now know that I can run a relatively successful company on largish sized jobs and if I needed to, could now market myself as an AD, CD, senior animator or even producer for any other region.

 

At this point in my career, I would say you can certainly continue with Mograph for a long time but what you would need to consider is working with clients and shops that truly value your working relationship rather than drive you to works insane hours. There is always the need for that at some points, but in the shop I run, we really try and stick to a 9-6 schedule and work with our clients to develop that as expectations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At this point in my career, I would say you can certainly continue with Mograph for a long time but what you would need to consider is working with clients and shops that truly value your working relationship rather than drive you to works insane hours. There is always the need for that at some points, but in the shop I run, we really try and stick to a 9-6 schedule and work with our clients to develop that as expectations.

 

 

 

Glad to hear we are not the only ones. We really try and stick to a 9-6 schedule as well, and late nights and weekends are really the exceptions rather than the rule. Sometimes I wonder if it's possible to keep it up with a lot of the competition doing the crazy burnout hours, but at some point I think of you are in it for the long haul you need to work out some kind of reasonable schedule for yourself, you can't be going until 2 AM all the time it takes more and more of a toll with every passing year.

 

On the plus side I guess it makes it attractive for people to want to work for you even if you may not be the highest paying gig in town.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel like you can work fairly normal hours in mograph but you have to really seek out those studios. Even in LA there are lots of high end places where 8-9 hour days are the norm unless something crazy is going on. Or if you've got the guts/skills I've worked with some freelancers who will straight up leave at 7pm no matter what, unless there's a deadline that night. They could pull it off since they were really good and established, but it still seemed extremely ballsy at the time.

 

This industry is killer for dating though. I've ruined too many relationships because nobody is going to believe you when you tell them you're working literally every waking moment the next 3 days. Or that you found out at 7pm you're going to be working 6 more hours.

Edited by Xaltotun

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

when i had issues with shops that would try to work me too hard ( although i was waay ahead of schedule). I introduced an exponentially increasing hourly rate after the 8 hour block.

 

I don't work with them anymore =)

 

Some shops are just out there to exploit artists with no business sense.

 

As someone mentioned in another thread their are often artists with no discernable differences working side by side, while one makes 60k and the other 200k, just because the other is better at negotiating.

 

here is an excercise that everyone should try on a regular basis. When asked for your day rate. add a "1" to the beginning ( in emails). And see what the response is. Worst case, say it was a typo =)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

here is an excercise that everyone should try on a regular basis. When asked for your day rate. add a "1" to the beginning ( in emails). And see what the response is. Worst case, say it was a typo =)

 

add $25 each job till you get push back. then you've hit a threshold.

 

also. this book is SUPER relevant: http://myuuu.fr/livre/DesignIsAJob.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
here is an excercise that everyone should try on a regular basis. When asked for your day rate. add a "1" to the beginning ( in emails). And see what the response is. Worst case, say it was a typo =)

 

I had something similar happen where the producer thought I was giving him my hourly rate when I gave him my day rate. He was not really down with that amount at aaaall.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...