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joedonaldson

What to look for and negotiate for in an interview

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Hello fellow mographians,

 

I recently relocated to Chicago and this upcoming Monday I have an interview for a FCP editors position at a local studio. I am pretty new to the game and wanted to see if any of you had any advice on what to look for during the interview, questions to ask and what to negotiate for? It is a mid level studio and I definitely feel that I can hit the ground running and make some awesome work.

 

I am a student so if everything works out will be looking to work part-time, anywhere between 24-30 hours a week.

 

Thanks in advance.

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Don't ask too many questions. It only makes you look like you don't know much, driving down your value. Ask what their client base is / what type of spots they create there, let them know that you really want to get your hands dirty, and thats about it. Other than that, focus on answering their questions.

 

Don't be the first the throw out a number, but don't negotiate hard either. You don't have much leverage and everyone knows that your there mainly for the learning experience and they brought in a student for cheap help. Just make sure that you don't accept a rate that won't keep you fed and sheltered.

 

Try to refrain from talking about your current status as a student as much as possible. Of course it will be brought up, but don't say things like "oh yeah, we learned about that just last week in class"... That looks bad.

 

Confidence is key. Don't make it sound like you don't know a thing and your trying to learn on their dime. But don't try to prove yourself either, as you will inevitably say something incorrect or so basic that it will leave them wondering why you think what you said is bragging rights rather than industry common sense (no offense, we've all been there). Just shut up, be happy, be their friend, and you will be fine.

 

Good luck and let us know how it went! biggrin.gif

Edited by AromaKat

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Don't ask too many questions. It only makes you look like you don't know much, driving down your value. Ask what their client base is / what type of spots they create there, let them know that you really want to get your hands dirty, and thats about it. Other than that, focus on answering their questions.

 

Don't be the first the throw out a number, but don't negotiate hard either. You don't have much leverage and everyone knows that your there mainly for the learning experience and they brought in a student for cheap help. Just make sure that you don't accept a rate that won't keep you fed and sheltered.

 

Try to refrain from talking about your current status as a student as much as possible. Of course it will be brought up, but don't say things like "oh yeah, we learned about that just last week in class"... That looks bad.

 

Confidence is key. Don't make it sound like you don't know a thing and your trying to learn on their dime. But don't try to prove yourself either, as you will inevitably say something incorrect or so basic that it will leave them wondering why you think what you said is bragging rights rather than industry common sense (no offense, we've all been there). Just shut up, be happy, be their friend, and you will be fine.

 

Good luck and let us know how it went! biggrin.gif

 

Thanks for the reply!

 

I am definitely looking forward to seeing how this pans out.

 

In my resume it states that I am currently in school and the job description didn't stated a required amount of hours so hopefully that doesn't blow me out of the water right away.

 

I'm feeling good about it though. Based on the companies work and my last job (videographer and editor for broadcast news for three years) I definitely feel I can pull my weight there.

 

I'll just have to make sure not to ask to many questions and be a cool dude.

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I'll just have to make sure not to ask to many questions and be a cool dude.

 

More important than people think sometimes.

Coming across as a personable guy that would be easy to work with goes a very long way in this business. Perhaps it's true anywhere, but when deadlines get tight and patience wear thin everyone likes to know the other guy or gal working with them is not going to be pushing their buttons. Keep it professional, of course, but being friendly and affable shows confidence and personality.

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Also notice your interviewers surroundings ... I saw that when I went for a studio job at one of the last studios I worked at, the guy had a big Yankees baseball print on his wall.

 

Told him I was a fan, we talked for about 2 hours and I got a call back for a final interview bout 4 hours later. Being sociable and confident makes you a person want to work with

 

My last interview I flirted like a pimp and wore a tracksuit and waxed lyrical about the good old days of broadcast...it worked

 

P.S. iline your my hero haha

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So is it better to grill the person interviewing you about benefits, the companies culture, and etc if you get called back for a follow up? Or would those questions be okay? Wouldn't thoughtful questions indicate that you were looking to stay at a company for longer than a year? ...And...I guess if you asked appropriate questions you could determine before you took the job if you would want to work at the company and not be stuck looking for another job in a year. Or...is it pretty normal in this industry to move around to different companies regularly?

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So is it better to grill the person interviewing you about benefits, the companies culture, and etc if you get called back for a follow up? Or would those questions be okay? Wouldn't thoughtful questions indicate that you were looking to stay at a company for longer than a year? ...And...I guess if you asked appropriate questions you could determine before you took the job if you would want to work at the company and not be stuck looking for another job in a year. Or...is it pretty normal in this industry to move around to different companies regularly?

 

Don't ask too many questions about the benefits. If anything, just ask if benefits are included when offered a rate and you are still unsure whether benefits are even offered. I wouldn't ask for details because everyone at the company is getting the same package that you would be. Usually, benefits come with package options that you can pay more or less into, depending on what you feel fits you best.

 

Also, not all companies offer benefits, so be prepared for that possibility. If you must have insurance and benefits are not part of the deal, then you actually have some leverage to ask for a little bit more to cover the cost of private insurance.

 

As you gain more foothold in the industry, then a benefits package can be a deal breaker - absolutely. However, it sounds like the OP is looking for work within the industry, for a company that is willing to work with his school schedule. Therefore, benefits is not really a priority here.

 

Also, PT workers might not even be offered benefits like a FT employee would.

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Thanks for all the great feedback.

 

I think I'll try and find a nice medium between track jacket wearing flirt and serious potential employee. Compliment on the surroundings, ask smart questions but not too many, dont brag and most importantly be personable and friendly.

 

I definitely have my fingers crossed.

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Thanks for all the great feedback.

 

I think I'll try and find a nice medium between track jacket wearing flirt and serious potential employee. Compliment on the surroundings, ask smart questions but not too many, dont brag and most importantly be personable and friendly.

 

I definitely have my fingers crossed.

 

Keep us posted

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