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Twist

Cinema 4D- How do you remain faithful to a clients CI when you light a 3D-model ?

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Hi!

 

when you create a 3d-animation and/or object for a client one of the most essential issues is to preserve the original colors of the product. Especially when it comes to logos, signs etc.. I use Cinema 4D and I usually have a hard time to achieve this with normal lighting. Therefore it seems that global illumination is a great way to preserve the original colors of an object. my problem is, that the lighting of GI is so even that you loose the details of the objects edges (see picture). Is there a way to achieve even lighting to keep the colors (and so be faithfull to the customers CI) AND to accentuate details of an object ?

 

5v2c-16.jpg

Edited by Twist

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-a very good case for using multi-pass renders. This'll give you more control in the compositing phase to get the colors where the client wants them. Faster tweaks and feedback.

 

 

 

in your attached image it looks to me like the first one is actually using the luminance channel for color, rather than GI for lighting. If not, the question in that case would be what are you using to light your scene? (for GI).

 

-mike

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in your attached image it looks to me like the first one is actually using the luminance channel for color, rather than GI for lighting. If not, the question in that case would be what are you using to light your scene? (for GI).

 

-mike

 

hi mike!

 

thx for your reply! im actually using global illumination by scaling a large sphere around the scene and put a glow texture on it!

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When you say glow... do you actually mean the glow channel?

 

-m

 

i meant the "luminance" channel sorry. in the material editor i just enable the luminance (which is white by default) and put the texture on the sphere.

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Thing is the colour shift you're talking about is kind of an inherant side effect of making something 3d if something is lit and shaded it so you see its 3 dimensional form the colours will obviously shift somewhat. A real world analogy would be if you made a sign and painted it a specific pantone colour and then took it into a studio lit it and photographed it the colours in the photographs wouldn't match the original pantone or be entirely regular across its suface.

 

I think your confusing yourself over what GI is for, its a way of similating the scattering and reflection of light in a more realistic and real world fashion than traditional "3d" lighting techniques.

As beckman said above if you want that evenly shaded look you've got illustrated above you can simply use the luminance channel in the material and it will be flat shaded 100% in your colour of choice and will render probably 100x faster than using GI.

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thanks for your replies guys. @magictea: you're right...GI is not the best way to light an object that has to keep a specific colour tone and is way too slow to render.

 

if you want that evenly shaded look you've got illustrated above you can simply use the luminance channel in the material and it will be flat shaded 100% in your colour of choice and will render probably 100x faster than using GI.

 

nick from "greyscalegorilla.com" had a great tipp concerning that: when using the luminance channel ..additionaly you can add a fresnel shader where the colors slightly differ from each other. this way you still stay in your color tone overall but since you have a tiny gradient in your fresnel shader you can still see some details of the object!

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If your clients are worried about colour fidelity another option could be to use fully luminous shaders as described above and use ambient occlusion to add some shading to the recessed and detailed areas of your model. You can render out the occlusion as a separate pass from the multipass renderer to give you more control to tweak the strength of the effect in post as well.

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use ambient occlusion to add some shading to the recessed and detailed areas of your model.

 

I used ambient occlusion and there is no difference at all (see picture below). the problem is that when using ambient occlusion you need an object with a more complex structure than a cube or at least something else around casting shadows. in case of a single object with a flat surface like a cube you still don't see the details with AO.

 

5v2c-17.jpg

Edited by Twist

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You should read up on GI and AO. The above example is the worst one for AO since it simply can't do anything here.

As for using the luminance channel to ensure the correct color for an object, this will completely mess up any lighting.

As magictea pointed out you can combine the two, but ultimately AO will again change the colors, just like normal shading does.

The ultimate fact is that 3D rendering simply can not recreate specific colors, the two are mutual exclusive since rendering is all about changing the shading and therefore the displayed color of an object according to lighting conditions.

 

Cheers

Björn

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Stand in a room with the real product in your hand, stand near a light switch... Look at the logo, now switch the light off and look at the logo again. The colours didn't physically change, don't let your client try to convince you otherwise.

 

If they want their logo to be a flat pantone colour then what they're looking for is a poster.

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What I find most clients are after is for the final resolve to look like the flat, official logo.

I wouldn't stress too much about how you get there animation wise, like froj said, the color of the object might apear to change, but that's simply a result of the lighting.

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