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Biederbeck

From Print - To Motion

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So. I am a new designer, (3 years). I am newer to motion (16 months AE, 4 months C4D).

It is pretty easy to find theory about general design (type, color layout etc.) and I feel as though I have a pretty good handle on this.

 

But... In regards to motion, all I find are tutorials for recreating other people's work. I am having extreme difficulty finding topics about transition, and paceing in my projects (obviously some of the most crucial aspects to motion).

 

Can anyone direct me to a site, or give insight into these two areas, of motion graphics theory?

Or, am I missing the mark altogether... for instance: should I be looking at it more from an editor's standpoint, a camera-man's standpoint, and study up on those areas of the industry?

 

Any ideas would be greatly appreciate.

 

 

 

PS. I am using c4d and AE.

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Guest Sao_Bento

You really want to look at film editing unless you are doing character animation, in which case, the Disney stuff is great. The Blink of an Eye, by Walter Murch is a pretty good one.

http://www.amazon.com/Blink-Eye-Revised-2nd/dp/1879505622/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1300933124&sr=1-2

 

I think I used to tell people to read Film Sense or The FIlm Form by Eisenstein, but a lot of people find them outdated and hard to get through.

 

The first step is to become aware of the editing you see every-time you watch a movie. Then start to think about how that shapes the story. In motion graphics, you're doing the same thing, just with different elements - setting a tone, creating tension and release, and usually telling some sort of a story. Think of yourself as a film director whose working from a broader palette than just photography, but the approaches are very similar. What kind of motion is appropriate for what you're trying to communicate?

 

I used to work out the music and pacing first, by just cutting different color solids together to get a feel for how long each scene needed to be, then go back and fill it in with the final design, shot by shot.

 

 

 

So. I am a new designer, (3 years). I am newer to motion (16 months AE, 4 months C4D).

It is pretty easy to find theory about general design (type, color layout etc.) and I feel as though I have a pretty good handle on this.

 

But... In regards to motion, all I find are tutorials for recreating other people's work. I am having extreme difficulty finding topics about transition, and paceing in my projects (obviously some of the most crucial aspects to motion).

 

Can anyone direct me to a site, or give insight into these two areas, of motion graphics theory?

Or, am I missing the mark altogether... for instance: should I be looking at it more from an editor's standpoint, a camera-man's standpoint, and study up on those areas of the industry?

 

Any ideas would be greatly appreciate.

 

 

 

PS. I am using c4d and AE.

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Thanks Sao. Really appreciated.

I find GKaster and mono_fitz very intriguine. I definitely see their approach being similar to that of a camera-man, and editor.

 

Character animation is not of any interest to me. I'm ADhD and find it too technical.

 

Thanks for the reply! Keep it coming!

 

You really want to look at film editing unless you are doing character animation, in which case, the Disney stuff is great. The Blink of an Eye, by Walter Murch is a pretty good one.

http://www.amazon.co...00933124&sr=1-2

 

I think I used to tell people to read Film Sense or The FIlm Form by Eisenstein, but a lot of people find them outdated and hard to get through.

 

The first step is to become aware of the editing you see every-time you watch a movie. Then start to think about how that shapes the story. In motion graphics, you're doing the same thing, just with different elements - setting a tone, creating tension and release, and usually telling some sort of a story. Think of yourself as a film director whose working from a broader palette than just photography, but the approaches are very similar. What kind of motion is appropriate for what you're trying to communicate?

 

I used to work out the music and pacing first, by just cutting different color solids together to get a feel for how long each scene needed to be, then go back and fill it in with the final design, shot by shot.

 

 

 

 

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I think that a good way to look at it when you're first starting is, "how can I get from point A to B?" If you've already developed your design skills, those A and B points probably look pretty sweet. The trick is to try to think of how you can move forward from one to the other in a way that tells a story. Sao's point about film editing is a good one too. You might want to check out a couple books like:

 

David Mament's "On Directing Film"

http://www.amazon.com/Directing-Film-David-Mamet/dp/0140127224

 

And "Film Directing Shot by Shot"

http://www.amazon.com/Film-Directing-Shot-Visualizing-Productions/dp/0941188108/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1301082469&sr=1-1

 

Oldies but goodies.

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As mentioned with the disney references. I find those to be invaluable resources, not just for character animation, they deal with exageration, anticipation, squash and stretch, all principles that can be used in whatever your animating.

 

quickly I couldn't find the link, but somehting to do with the old wise men, original animators at disney, principles key

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i think also, adding little tiny moving details, like when youre looking at a rivers current, there is the gross motion in one direction, but then there are all these little details to the movement which makes the stream fun to look at

 

so theres the gross movement you need to figure out, and that should be cool and interesting try some things out, but then i feel like adding little secondary motion and compositing tweaks helps a lot.

 

then i guess on top of that is knowing when is too much - but usually when i see work by people just starting out, its usually lacking in lifelike gurgling motion

 

oh and avoid harsh linear keyframes for start/stops unless youre animating something super mechanical, and even then, if something should jerk into place, maybe add some secondary motion

 

just my 2c

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