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Trione

Monikers?

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Binky said something recently in another thread that really got me thinking. I thought I would start a new thread instead of hijacking another.

Also, I won't suggest that you need an outright name change, but I will repeat that a name like "artistic synthesis" is pretty much the same as "I'm Sooooo Creative" or "Trust Me I'm Real Good". The problem is that it's TELLING us something instead of proving it by SHOWING us. If you want someone to believe something, you show them that it's so. You can tell me all day long how big that fish was, but until I see it, it's just a claim (see how I just showed you by example right there?). So, if your name IS somehow an artistic synthesis, that's going to be more powerful than if it literally says "artistic synthesis". Bear this in mind for everything you do: In every instance of communication, in every medium, showing is ALWAYS (!!) more powerful than telling. A person will believe what they see/experience above what they are told/sold.

 

 

 

I was wondering if it's possible to take a name that is a claim like my website, Damn Fine Work, and brand it so that I don't seem like a bastard? When I chose the name I was trying to embrace a blue collar vibe. The name reminded me of those old guys who answer the phone saying, "How the hell are you?". The name was chosen to be a goal, not necessarily a claim. I've kind of tried to use some language in my about section to get that across, but does anyone even really look at that part of a website?

Thanks,

Trione

Edited by Trione

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As mentioned before, the name isn't too important, it's really about the work.

The work makes the name not visa versa.

Personally I like Damn Fine Work. It's memorable and gets the message across.

I think people read the 'About' bit out of curiosity, it's the reel that'll get you work.

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I was wondering if it's possible to take a name that is a claim like my website, Damn Fine Work, and brand it so that I don't seem like a bastard?

Damn Fine Work has a sense of humor about itself, and that helps. Anyone with a decent sense of humor will take it as sarcasm, and as such it appears to be self-effacing, not gloating. So it's not really in the same boat as other exclamatory titles, mostly because it's self-aware and is, ironically, kind of making a joke at the expense of exclamatory titles. Sort of an odd case. "Psyop" does this in a way. Taken at face value, it's a sort of foreboding, an aggression of psychological warfare. But it's the name of a company that makes pretty advertisements, so you know it's having a poke at itself.

 

I usually look at "about" pages as something people may check out when they're already enamored of someone's work. Otherwise, who cares? So, on your own site, if you're already winning the battle, you can use the about page for sealing the deal with background and contact info and all that. But if you're still trying to make your case in the about page, it's because something's missing from your portfolio/reel. Ie. if you feel like the "damn fine work" joke isn't apparent from your visual presentation, you're not likely to get the chance to solve that problem in your about page.

 

Does that make more sense? Sorry if i was confusing.

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I think it makes sense to use a moniker in terms of dealing with larger agencies and clients.

 

For a start, how can you refer to your 'studio' in plural terms if it's just your name (assuming as I do that clients/agencies prefer to deal with perceived studios rather than real individuals): "We at Dave Smith are all really hyped about this project"

 

Secondly, your own name is less tarnished by those less-than-smooth projects: "Dave Smith really f**ked up on this one"

 

People coming across your website, as they will and do, are slightly more impressed by 'Gkaster' or 'Dstrukt' than perhaps "Pierre Magnol" and "Chris Hewitt" due to the perception of a consumable brand than an identifiable human being...and at the same time, both of these 'brands' are actually exceptionally talented human beings, digital artists in the true sense, whose work could and should be credited to the individuals responsible.

 

Do you wish to be regarded as an exceptional individual commercial artist or are you merely pimping up your availability for bigger clients/projects by projecting a collective identity?

 

I'd side with people who find it a bit pretentious to find shade under a moniker as though they're a dubstep producer, unless they're VJs - but then VJs, I find, are frequently untalented video-pariahs who should probably avoid publicising their real identities to avoid social networking stalkers.

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...reminds me that i need to update my clients with my new, design-moniker, "Max Power". Do people ask clients to refer to them in person in this fashion, or is this only for online presence? At the moment I primarily use it for making dinner reservations and auto repair appointments.

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Damn Fine Work has a sense of humor about itself, and that helps. Anyone with a decent sense of humor will take it as sarcasm, and as such it appears to be self-effacing, not gloating. So it's not really in the same boat as other exclamatory titles, mostly because it's self-aware and is, ironically, kind of making a joke at the expense of exclamatory titles. Sort of an odd case. "Psyop" does this in a way. Taken at face value, it's a sort of foreboding, an aggression of psychological warfare. But it's the name of a company that makes pretty advertisements, so you know it's having a poke at itself.

 

I usually look at "about" pages as something people may check out when they're already enamored of someone's work. Otherwise, who cares? So, on your own site, if you're already winning the battle, you can use the about page for sealing the deal with background and contact info and all that. But if you're still trying to make your case in the about page, it's because something's missing from your portfolio/reel. Ie. if you feel like the "damn fine work" joke isn't apparent from your visual presentation, you're not likely to get the chance to solve that problem in your about page.

 

Does that make more sense? Sorry if i was confusing.

 

That makes sense. Thanks, Binky.

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all this interesting info. I use a brand coz my actual name is unpronounceable to most english speakers.

 

also, take it from me, if thinking of a name, don't use numbers in your domain name, its kinda annoying when dictating the adress to people.

 

my about page needs some work... sounds major douchy right now..

 

btw @damnfinework. I like it, doesnt sound arrogant to me or anything, as was said, has a sense of humour to it. works well in my opinion.

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I think Monovich best summed up my reasons for choosing a moniker.

I'm going to go with pseudonym on this one because it allows you to gracefully morph from individual to company when you want and as you bring on new clients.

 

Thanks, everyone. I'm glad to hear that my moniker doesn't make me sound like a bastard. I'm going to work on using imagery in my reel and homepage to further communicate the joke. Thanks again.

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I'm going to work on using imagery in my reel and homepage to further communicate the joke. Thanks again.

 

I really dig your about section now. That perfectly sums it up in an unmistakable statement.

 

AboutPicture.png

 

 

 

With my name I wasn't intending it to be exclamatory or making any pretentious claims, just a name for a portfolio site I used since college, but I definitely see how it comes off as that. Glad somebody finally told it to me straight... the advice from Binky & pix3l is probably the best advice I've gotten since getting into motion graphics. Gonna drop that shit & go with my real name. *edited typo*

Edited by Artistic Synthesis

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I think it makes sense to use a moniker in terms of dealing with larger agencies and clients.

 

For a start, how can you refer to your 'studio' in plural terms if it's just your name (assuming as I do that clients/agencies prefer to deal with perceived studios rather than real individuals): "We at Dave Smith are all really hyped about this project"

 

Secondly, your own name is less tarnished by those less-than-smooth projects: "Dave Smith really f**ked up on this one"

 

People coming across your website, as they will and do, are slightly more impressed by 'Gkaster' or 'Dstrukt' than perhaps "Pierre Magnol" and "Chris Hewitt" due to the perception of a consumable brand than an identifiable human being...and at the same time, both of these 'brands' are actually exceptionally talented human beings, digital artists in the true sense, whose work could and should be credited to the individuals responsible.

 

Do you wish to be regarded as an exceptional individual commercial artist or are you merely pimping up your availability for bigger clients/projects by projecting a collective identity?

 

I'd side with people who find it a bit pretentious to find shade under a moniker as though they're a dubstep producer, unless they're VJs - but then VJs, I find, are frequently untalented video-pariahs who should probably avoid publicising their real identities to avoid social networking stalkers.

 

 

I think this is really the best case for a moniker. It sort of puts a distance between yourself and the work, and some clients could potentially want to deal with a moniker (which could be one person, could be a half dozen, who knows) rather than just a single entity.

 

It also lets you maybe dodge, or at least remove yourself psychologically, from some of the harsher criticism that may come your way. Then again, it also sort of forces you to not fully receive all the praise you may be due if people are congratulating your moniker, not you

 

 

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