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How do you develop motion concepts?

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I am curious as to the different processes folks follow to initiate and develop your concepting. How do you develop an idea? Is your thumbnailing process begin with a keyframe? I am just evaluating my own and was curious as to what other artists are doing.

 

-gl

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I think the process depends on the project.

 

For most of the broadcast work I do, I speak with the client, create styleboards in After Effects/Photoshop, and start creating motion-tests for editors to drop into their cuts. For commercial work, I usually create storyboards, a rough version of the animation, and then a final version based on approvals of everything preceding it.

 

Personally, I don't start with keyframing anything - I always design before animating.

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What I do is: Find out what the client wants, then I go directly to Video Co-Pilot, and find a tutorial that best fits their needs. Then I do the tutorial, replace the text where necessary and claim the work is mine.

 

 

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What I do is: Find out what the client wants, then I go directly to Video Co-Pilot, and find a tutorial that best fits their needs. Then I do the tutorial, replace the text where necessary and claim the work is mine.

 

 

 

Aha! I'm better than you! I change the color too!

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My process would be similar to Mr. Glanz. Regardless of it be a client or self initiated project, i do not touch anything digital until i brain storm a few ideas in written out, (point form of key words or fully developed concept) following after wards with a rough doodle to see if my idea is going to work or not. Lately however, i have been designing boards in AE, which is something i never did till this year. I am also curious to what other people process is like.

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What I do is: Find out what the client wants, then I go directly to Video Co-Pilot, and find a tutorial that best fits their needs. Then I do the tutorial, replace the text where necessary and claim the work is mine.

 

This.

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I read this book recently: http://www.amazon.com/Don-Bluths-Art-Storyboard-Bluth/dp/1595820078

I'm still more of an motion animator than a motion designer (I'm working on changing that), but I found the book helpful.

 

To summarise: Get a very clear idea of what you want to communicate....and only then start thinking about the "how" and do the first rough sketches.

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In any design project, my normal process is to not go anywhere near the computer until I have a solid idea as to what I want to execute. With motion design, I have been experimenting with different approaches. I guess what stimulated my question was mainly style frames. They usually look pretty finished and I wondered at which part of the process designers were providing those? It seems like a lot of work to show concepts when the client could come back on make significant changes.

 

-gl

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Relatedly, music is such a key element, when do you typically select and edit your audio? I recognize this all depends on the type of project but, in a corporate/broadcast type of project when are you selecting your audio?

 

-gl

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I guess what stimulated my question was mainly style frames. They usually look pretty finished and I wondered at which part of the process designers were providing those? It seems like a lot of work to show concepts when the client could come back on make significant changes.

 

It's the opposite. You show them a style frame for them to sign off on the look before you start animating. It's way less work to make changes at the style frame stage than once you actually start animating.

 

My process when things go well is:

 

1. Figure out with client what needs to be communicated.

2. Come up with some idea of how, and verbally discuss with the client or submit a written treatment.

3. Do some rough sketches and boards (these may or may not get shown to client).

4. Do a couple style frames to get the client to sign off on over all look.

5. Rough animation (client signs off on overall timings).

6. Polished animation.

 

I try and follow more or less this process even on quickie jobs even though some of the stages tend to get compressed and don't get the time they deserve. On fast jobs I do my style frames in AE so I can do my own motion tests at the same time and if the look gets the thumbs up it's pretty quick to animate. On more involved jobs I do the style frames however and then rebuild the scenes in whatever apps I'm using to animate. The extra step of rebuilding the style frames gives me a chance to think about workflow and the most efficient approach to the animation and helps keep things clean and organized.

Edited by anothername

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Rob Garrott did a presentation at NAB for C4D that touched upon this topic. (I believe it's available on Cineversity-live); a pretty good set of best practices regarding workflow.

-mike

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