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deceasar

Church Bumper

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http://vimeo.com/26968936

pass: uprising

 

Hey guys.

 

I just finished a 3D project in Cinema and wanted to post the final here.

It's pretty simple but I def feel like I'm progressing from where I started

in 3D

 

I don't do as many 3D projects as I would like but it feels good when I'm

able to do them. I always learn a lot. This time it seems texturing and

rendering were the big hurdles.

 

There are things I wish I could of done better. I don't like that the bricks

just explode into perfect cubes. I tried playing with Nitro4D but didn't have the

time to really make it do what I needed it to do. The texturing started freaking

out when I had it set to fillet. Not sure why that was.

 

Had so many rendering issues.

Started with GI then went to AO and finally got some kinks worked out where in the

end GI worked the best for me. AO just kept looking like crap and taking forever to render.

 

 

Anyways thanks to all who helped me out with some of my questions.

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Hey deceasar, my advice is to think about the camera a bit more, use it as an actor not just a window. You start staring at a brick wall, without explaining why. Then the whole wall explodes - whoa - but the camera just jiggles a bit and carries on its merry way like that happens every day. So, try giving the camera something to look at before the wall explodes - stick a lamp-post in the way with a poster on it or something, or maybe make the wall jiggle a bit and rattle, dust falling out of the cracks... and then have it react as the explosion occurs, jump back and turn to look as the dust settles. Crouch down and use the low angle to add drama. Blam! There's the logo, punched out of the rubble in a gleam of smoky volumetric light.

 

Sure the bricks could look better as they break apart, and shadows blah blah - I bet the texture problem was the UVs being mashed - but that's not going to help the scene, because they're not the problem...

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Hey deceasar, my advice is to think about the camera a bit more, use it as an actor not just a window. You start staring at a brick wall, without explaining why. Then the whole wall explodes - whoa - but the camera just jiggles a bit and carries on its merry way like that happens every day. So, try giving the camera something to look at before the wall explodes - stick a lamp-post in the way with a poster on it or something, or maybe make the wall jiggle a bit and rattle, dust falling out of the cracks... and then have it react as the explosion occurs, jump back and turn to look as the dust settles. Crouch down and use the low angle to add drama. Blam! There's the logo, punched out of the rubble in a gleam of smoky volumetric light.

 

Sure the bricks could look better as they break apart, and shadows blah blah - I bet the texture problem was the UVs being mashed - but that's not going to help the scene, because they're not the problem...

 

Chris,

 

Thanks for the feedback. I really appreciate it. Your def right. It feels pretty empty and doesn't have a whole lot of emotion.

I should of added more in the scene for sure. I think I was trying to make it feel kind of epic but in the end I just spend a ton

of time on trying to figure out lighting and rendering and troubleshooting.

 

 

I had the textures set to cubic cause having it set to UV applied the entire texture to each individual brick.

 

 

again thanks for the feedback!

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Thanks for the feedback. I really appreciate it. Your def right. It feels pretty empty and doesn't have a whole lot of emotion. I should of added more in the scene for sure. I think I was trying to make it feel kind of epic but in the end I just spend a ton of time on trying to figure out lighting and rendering and troubleshooting.

 

I've been working ye ole' 3D skills too, and I think something that's become really apparent is that unless you want your renders to look like computer stuff, you really have to take the raw result and do some color grading. You can use something as simple as Magic Bullet Looks and that'll help get it away from the homogenous look of straight renders. Once you really get into grading, then you can start creating moods, which will help you get that "epic" quality, or any other quality you're searching for.

 

More importantly, for something to be epic, you kind of have to give it a context to exist in. You have to have something to contrast it against. Something that's mundane or otherwise not epic, so that when your epic thing happens, we have something to relate it to. What's more, you probably need to build a bit of tension to the climactic moment, so that we know something is coming, and can be in some way excited for its arrival, before it finally happens. This is about teasing and anticipation. Part of this is camera work, as ChrisC noted.

 

As an example, what if the camera is looking intently at a weed growing out of a crack in the wall, and the shot is really tight with shallow depth of field and feels sort of handheld. The cameraman notices the crack in the wall spits out a little bit of dust, and s/he subtly re-points the lens to focus more on that. Then the crack suddenly shifts and grows. Now the cameraman is slightly alarmed and backs up half a step. There's a very short moment while the camera refocuses where something flashes or moves inside of the crack, and perhaps before it even gets a clean look again, the wall explodes and knocks the cameraman on his/her ass. The lighting changes as this alternate reality pours out of the gaping hole, into the camera's reality. The camera, perhaps set at a slightly off-kilter angle, stares in awe up at the object that's looming overhead, partially obscured in darkness. You could hold there and fade out, or you could have something else happen that causes the footage to run out. The important thing is that you tell that little story so that the critical event feels powerful and grandiose.

 

This is where storyboarding, even as sketches, will help you work out your intentions before you start getting overly concerned with whether your bricks are breaking the way you want them or the AO isn't quite right. If you want "epic", you have to feel it in your storyboards first. Then you move on and design a still frame, or ten, to punch up that epic moment with an epic look, paying attention to how everything is being conveyed visually. Then you can move on to executing something really satisfying.

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I've been working ye ole' 3D skills too, and I think something that's become really apparent is that unless you want your renders to look like computer stuff, you really have to take the raw result and do some color grading. You can use something as simple as Magic Bullet Looks and that'll help get it away from the homogenous look of straight renders. Once you really get into grading, then you can start creating moods, which will help you get that "epic" quality, or any other quality you're searching for.

 

 

Hey man. Thanks so much for your feedback.

 

Yeah I def did some grading/grain/lens flares/ etc on it. That's one thing I made sure to make some time for.

And I agree that stuff really helps polish.

 

I had about 9 days total to do this project. That included tests and discussing with the client what they wanted.

And from jumping back into CInema again i was a bit rusty but a lot of stuff came back to me pretty quickly.

 

 

Again thanks so much for your feedback and ideas.

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Have a search for some dirt maps.

They are greyscale photos of dirty textures. You put them in the Diffusion channel of your materials.

 

It would help break up the concrete texture and reduce the "too clean" CG look.

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The piece itself is a bitte doom and gloom for me especially in regards to a Church bumper but hell thats just me. One bit of advice I would give would be to work on the brick wall texture a bit. The wall breaking into perfect rectangles doesn't bother me but what does is that the perfect rectangles don't have any relationship to the size of the bricks on the texture. Right now each exploding segment is like 1.5 bricks based on the texture. It will be extremely hard to match every brick to the texture but just making the texture/brick match in size will go a long way for believability.

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Weren't you looking for a way to make realistic textured bricks? Or at least for the wall to break where the gaps are to make a nice steppy hole? I think it'd be nice to have a hole bashed through, a few bricks hang out the sides and fall down after most of the others, the camera goes through the hole to clear the frame for the resolve.

 

You're almost there - except your bricks are not bricks, they're perfect blocks. It's tough because the mortar needs to be modelled in as well as the brick.

 

I would model a single brick, replete with texture and displacement, straight away. UVing that is piss easy with a bricky red texture off the net. Save the brick in its own scene file, then merge it into your main scene. do a cloner object of the whole wall, with the correct gaps around each brick.

 

Make the clones real and brush-select a few big clusters of bricks and put them in their own nulls, which together would make the shape of a big hole in the wall. Take the few late-falling individual bricks out of the main wall's hierarchy cos these cos be hand animated.

 

Model the mortar fill on the main wall and the chunks, animate/dynamics the chunks being busted out of the wall. texture the individual bricks and do your timings, make the camera reveal the action as the others guys suggested.

 

You could even put in an emitter/tp emitter and put External Compositing on the emitted clones, and use those to drive Particular smoke/dust emitters in after effects

 

To do a wall texture from your existing scene... i'd save out an .ai of the scene, containing just the wall cloner object, and open that .ai in ps or illustrator - you'll have a perfect frontal view of your wall - to stretch/create your wall image. save that image out. back in cinema, camera project the wall texture onto the wall cloner (or do Frontal projection and Bake Texture to stick it...).

 

pretty low tech i know, but the devil is in the details. and dynamics usually means that objects can't overlap or touch even if Trigger on Collision is selected. what a pain.

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