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donm

Intro Reel

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my first reel. a couple of people told me to post my reel on here for the best critique. i am a beginner and my work is not great, which is why I'm here. i do motion design as a hobbie. im 17 years old currently at college. i wanna do a design degree after 1 more year of college.

 

intro reel - http://www.youtube.c...h?v=Vrg9EW0DjJc

 

heres my best piece (at least i think so anyway - http://www.youtube.c...h?v=qiWUgMNJlhw

 

many thanks in advance.

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Don,

 

What are you in school for?

 

My thoughts:

 

Your reel shows some promise, but there's a lot of what feels like redundancy in your work. I see a lot of 3D text and logos, all center screen, exploding, etc. You'll want to try and develop some range if design is a field you're interested.

 

That said, 17 is very young and you have a long way to go. If nothing else, you're showing that you have the ability to use the software. Good luck!

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Don,

 

What are you in school for?

 

My thoughts:

 

Your reel shows some promise, but there's a lot of what feels like redundancy in your work. I see a lot of 3D text and logos, all center screen, exploding, etc. You'll want to try and develop some range if design is a field you're interested.

 

That said, 17 is very young and you have a long way to go. If nothing else, you're showing that you have the ability to use the software. Good luck!

 

I am in college because i have to so i can move on to university and do a design degree. thanks for your feedback, much apreciated.

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what's the story behind your light kit?

i bought series of learning resources about lighting, i self taught myself some espresso and decided to make my own light kit. parts of it are similar to the gsg kit but all in all, its a whole new kit.

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Well, Don, you have a pretty good eye, and that will be a value to you as long as you continue to develop it. Right now though you don't have much range, by which I mean that all of the stuff you're making generally looks the same and is made in roughly the same way. Some people will say that that's your personal style, as a justification, but you're going to grow more, and grow faster, if you experiment with other ways of making things. Consider the universe of stuff you can make outside of C4D and AE. You've got a lot of imagemaking tools at your disposal outside of the computer. Photography, illustration, collage... you can use any method you want to make elements before you get into compositing mode. I realize that this reel is essentially a compilation of titles you've created for friends and internet gaming groups and stuff, and you're probably getting these assignments because they're wowed by the big 3D-with-lens-flares treatment you're giving them. But for your own sake, know that having a breadth of understanding in imagemaking will really push your overall abilities.

 

Second, if you want to go through a design curriculum, make sure it's one that doesn't teach software, that it's at a reputable art school, and that you can get exposure to both graphic/print design and filmmaking. The graphic design tract will help you understand how to solve problems like a designer and how to create images in a non-traditional way for the communication of messages, ideas, and emotions. It will also put an emphasis on typography, which a lot of people miss out on, to their very visible detriment. The filmmaking tract will help clarify your understanding of storytelling and all of its myriad concerns like editing and film language, and shit I don't even know about. Or maybe you can find a school where these two things are somehow integrated, but I don't know about any current programs like that, and I'd honestly be a little skeptical just yet.

 

Your attention to detail is pretty good, but when you go to school you'll learn how the specificity of your details communicate things, and then you can start making stuff with more intention. But once you start making with intention, beware of the trap that a lot of art school students fall into, and never get out of, which is a part of the critique. The classroom critique is usually framed as a "defend your work" situation, which leads lots of people to attempt to justify their failed design decisions somehow. They feel like their job is to win the argument of the critique, as opposed to understanding the feedback, reevaluating, and improving the design by whatever measure. I'm not saying you're that guy, but being aware of that tendency will help you get more out of school. It's not a battle, it's your chance to fail and learn. And the ability to fail is one of the most valuable things at school, because once you get into it professionally, people will be paying you NOT to fail.

 

Overall: step outside of your comfort zone, try things, fail harder.

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