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PauloBlob

10 years on the road. Now what?

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(I was pretty proud of it.)

 

But its true, the guy has no website links anywhere, all he does is hide behind his username and shout stuff. Take a look at his past posts. I don't see anything. just random stuff about being bent over by people. I cant see his work, i cant see him helping others.

 

I can't judge if his opinon has any weight, he might be a 13 year old for all i know.

 

Im open about who I am, people here know me both online, and in person. I stand behind what i say. I can back it up.

 

To be honest from the way he writes he sounds like one of those guys who doesn't pay his freelancers.

 

(watch him explode with self-defence) =)

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(I was pretty proud of it.)

 

You shouldn't be. The idea that his opinion is somehow less valid because he doesn't choose to share his actual identity or work with this forum is absurd. His opinion carries weight because he's been posting here forever.

 

I have edited my original post for clerification.

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I've been into motion design for nearly 15 years now and trust me: everybody in every imaginable job has to go through a crisis like you're doing at the moment (my first crisis came after no more than four years - so you're quite late actually). And the solution - as offensive as it might sound - is quite simple: get a life.

 

When i had the same problem, some years ago i quit my job and went on a three month surf trip with my old campervan. Three month without computer- or TV screens, just me, the beach, and some books - best medicine ever. I returned home, started freelancing and felt that my batteries where recharged and i was able to enjoy work again. Also the fact that, being a freelancer now, i usually had to deal with one project at a time - as opposed to my former full time position where i often had to watch over a couple of projects, while working on another one myself, felt much better. I also held a few workshops at universities, just for the sake of doing something a bit different from time to time and to get back a taste of my own "student days enthusiasm".

 

But after a few more years as a freelancer it again felt like i reached a dead end. I was still working too much and too long. It felt like i had already designed / re-designed and animated every f***in TV Station, every stupid TV Show and probably every single car brand on earth. And former dream projects like feature film titles or music videos mostly turned out to be horribly underpaid shit jobs for a bunch of arrogant idiots. One more year like this and i might have preferred to work as a bar mate.

 

Then - after another 36 hour project rescue mission - my mouse arm fell flat with carpal tunnel syndrome - time for another break! But this time i realized that just another holiday trip and then back to work wouldn't be sufficient, so i simply decided to take life more and work less serious. I forced myself to work 8-hour days and took off a few month every year. To my own surprise i'm still able to finish every project on time even though i'm spending less hours to do so. Also the quality of my work didn't suffer at all. I'd even dare to say it improved - maybe more spare time equals more ideas - maybe it's just my motivation that improved…

 

So what ever you decide to work - wether it's teaching, animation, motion design or bartender: just work to make a living - do not live to work.

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ha, yeah. I'm seriously not gonna get into this part of the argument other than to say I saw your reel . . .

 

 

. . .

 

 

 

So I do work in the industry, and I do get referred by producers

(do you know what producers are?, they're usually not just on the internet, but are actual people that hire you, etc).

 

The point is that everything you say has shown you are clueless as to what it means to be 'valid' as an artist or worker drone, or anything.

Frankly, I'm an older guy and I'm shootin' in the dark here but I think you represent a subsection of younger people that

think everything that happens on the internet is

 

A. real

 

B. important

 

C. real

 

 

This mini flame war originated only because I thought your original statement about teaching was idiotic.

That basically teachers who charge money are losers and worthless,

 

And then I realized that your image of a 'teacher' is a cheetos covered tween webcamming a vid on how to make a sniper scope using shape layers*.

And even more insane is that you dissed the ones who charge money, instead of 'giving it to the community' for free.

 

Another example of entitlement disguised as admiration of altruism.

 

http://www.merriam-w...ionary/altruism

(just in case)

 

If you want me to PM you a copy of my reel to show that it surpasses yours in more than a few areas, let me know,

and I'll cut one with my name removed, 'cause I want you to keep it out-cho-mouth.

 

But Im going to end this now, 'cause I'm in New York too, and I don't want a bad Internet repu . .

man, I can't even type it it's so queer.

 

 

 

 

* no disrespect to anyone actually making tuts about sniper scopes or shape layers, I just needed an example

Edited by microdot

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just post your reel minus the name.

 

there's a lot of guys on this board that post with authority but their reels aren't that great. but i think it's due to the fact that the industry is a closed society. very little on how it works is leaked so a lot of people are left to rely on their own personal experiences and nick campbell, as limited as it may be, as a basis for communication and interaction. me thinks mofos are scared to lose their jobs to the newbies. but we all know in the end its your reel that does the most talking, with the exception of personal recommendations and shit talking. oh the shit talking.

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just post your reel minus the name.

 

there's a lot of guys on this board that post with authority but their reels aren't that great. but i think it's due to the fact that the industry is a closed society. very little on how it works is leaked so a lot of people are left to rely on their own personal experiences and nick campbell, as limited as it may be, as a basis for communication and interaction. me thinks mofos are scared to lose their jobs to the newbies. but we all know in the end its your reel that does the most talking, with the exception of personal recommendations and shit talking. oh the shit talking.

 

yeah, we is a mofos closed society. me thinks you is right. I mofos.

 

ha ha, what are you taking about? nobody working at a serious studio will get jobs because of a recomendation or taking shit. Studio owners need to meet deadlines and get jobs done, and make money. Me thinks you crazy.

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what?

 

 

nobody working at a serious studio will get jobs because of a recomendation or taking shit. Studio owners need to meet deadlines and get jobs done, and make money.

 

 

yes. because atlanta is one of the two cities that the major studios call home.

 

 

there's a lot of guys on this board that post with authority but their reels aren't that great.

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Wow, i missed a lot over night.

 

a) internet is real for me. I started off on the internet, coz no one wanted to hire a guy with no degree in australia. So this was my only way. And still 95% of my work comes from the internet. While i was in new york i made a lot of connections in person. But didn't have the chance to do that in Australia.

 

B) So the internet is SUPER important for me, coz it pays for my rent, my drinking, my partying and really everything else i do in life. Without it i'd probably be in finance or engineering or some other dead end job.

 

c)see above.

 

"teacher?" webcam guy? Do you even read what i write?

Im not dissing the ones that charge money. Everyones gotta do what they gotta do. Im just saying if you have a choice, going to teaching for revenue is not a good idea both from a financial perspective and from a self fulfilment perspective. (for the reasons stated in my previous posts).

 

Re: reel, i don't need your reel in PM, it can be fukin psyops reel for all i care. I never claimed to be an epic designer, im more of an technical guy, the reel just has work that i would "Want" to do. I get most of my jobs through referals now too.

 

And finally, you said you're old, im not (23), im still learning, and i alway assume that there is a good chance that im wrong. Maybe charging money for teaching people and filtering out the people you teach by them being able to afford you is a good a fulfilling way to spend your life. I really don't know. But at this moment im still young and to me it seems like a pretty shitty direction to go if you have other options.

 

 

 

The point is that everything you say has shown you are clueless as to what it means to be 'valid' as an artist or worker drone, or anything.

 

totally missed that line, so i will address it now. The major benefit of being an "Artist" is you can do WHATEVER you want. There is no "Certificate of authenticity" There are no licenses for operation. And with all this (post)modernism crap, you put a toilet bowl on a pedestal, say you're an artist, and thats it. You are a valid artist. (people will write books about you)

 

When i talk about lack of internet reputation ( its really the same thing as real world reputation now, time to catch up man, Age of internet anonymity is over, there was even a TED talk about this somewhere i think). I don't mean you have to be super artist for your opinion to count. You have have to be someone, anyone really, you can have a totally crappy reel, doesnt matter. Just as long as you can be held liable for your opinion. It's the way social interaction in the real world works. And since we are deal with real problems here, it helps to know, what kind of person is giving these opinions.

 

 

As far as keeping your name "out-cho-mouth" goes, you do realize that if we ever meet in person i will instantly know it's you, right?

 

 

wow i have waay too much free time to write all this =) I should get to making some tutorials...

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The major benefit of being an "Artist" is you can do WHATEVER you want. There is no "Certificate of authenticity" There are no licenses for operation. And with all this (post)modernism crap, you put a toilet bowl on a pedestal, say you're an artist, and thats it. You are a valid artist. (people will write books about you)

 

Be aware that quotes like this might damage your internet reputation :ph34r:

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Sad to see a thread like this derail in mudslinging. Anyhoo, the "live to work, not work to live" thing is a choice everyone has to face at some point. Is your career worth sacrificing the rest of your life for. When you're young, often it is. Some are lucky to be able to smoothly transition into a more managerial role, some choose the cushiony corporate job, others have to face a possible career switch. It's something I'm wrestling with as well, the frank sharing portions of this thread have been a great read.

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I don't think this thread was derailed/hijacked.

We have good examples here of a veteran(s) in the business, and a rookie (and let me say that i'm in no way using this as a derogatory term).

The veterans in this biz know we all started out with wide-eyed optimism, and a "i'll work 25 hours" attitude. But after many 'tours of duty', we start questioning why am I here?

I'm willing to bet, it happens to everyone, and everyone has a different solution to the problem.

 

beer-icon.png

Here's to the veterans in the biz (and the rookies). Hang in there.

Now lets lay some C4 and blow this bitch up.

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has commercial art almost always been a young mans game?

 

It hasn't. I have one mate who's ten years older than I am and is still designing in his mid-fifties. His experience is unparalleled and his understanding of the areas he specialises in is absolute . . . but he's an exception. Why has this happened?

 

I was in the last year at my art school to be taught without using computers as a major part of the creative/production process and at that time ad agencies (about which I wholeheartedly agree with the monkey) and small design studios were full of older designers. Part of the education was leaving art school and being taught by these guys whom all had years of experience. I can remember being ripped to shreds by a 60-something typographer over some typography I'd designed for a brochure I was designing; I was mortified at the time but I came to realise how right he was, and I see work every day that must make him spit.

 

I can remember studios full of typographers, illustrators, visualizers, typesetters, finished artists, proof readers and graphic designers . . . and that was just a graphics studio. All of these skills were taught individually and valued, and all of them were far more involved than many today would ever believe they were.

 

When I left art school graphic design was a valued profession, and although you didn't have to get a qualification it helped if you went to an art school which was highly regarded locally. Leaving art school feeling like a fully-fledged designer many of us were thrown into a sort of second education, learning the ropes from the bottom up and starting (at least it felt like at the time) from scratch.

 

 

This whole structure seems to have disappeared as the technology has taken over. In many ways old scrotes like me hang on because of our extensive experience in a variety of disciplines. The people I know of my age who are still doing this tend to be highly experienced in a couple of specific areas and are regarded as a safe pair of hands. We've learnt not to bullshit, consider integrity as a designer fundamental and take an interest in developments in the field. So what? So do many newbies. Perhaps, but art schools now turn out kids who want to jump straight and not put the time in learning their craft. Did I say craft?

 

There is little craft left, and little respect for the craft such as it is from clients, project teams and those who commission the work, at least out here in the world of jobbing designers. The world has changed, spun a few more times around the sun. I mentioned Powerpoint before, but this genital wart of a programme is slowly destroying motion graphics as clients ignore pleas not to use it to structure storyboards, with them insisting on "doing it their way" despite the fact their way imposes all sorts of subtle and insidious subconscious limits on how animations and mograph projects are structured and developed. It's everywhere. It's foul, the antitheses of the creative process and the ability to think abstractly. It's a poor tool that's being used in tasks it was never designed for and is incapable of doing.

 

In many cases graphic designers are called in not for their creative input at the start of a project but to realise some bubble headed project assistant's or egocentric client's idea of how a video works. Eventually, the years of resisting the tide of mediocrity and indifference wears you down. I've seen it wear many down before me and like the OP it's wearing me too. I still love doing good design, good mograph and animation but many clients and their staff do not and are simply box-ticking (at best) and reflecting in your talent when it all works at worst. They're not interested in your opinion - just do the job for less, quicker and how I stay it should be done.

 

At the end of the day there are scores of young wannabes and hacks snapping at all our heels, competing for the same jobs (often undercutting to a ridiculous degree) and brimming with enthusiasm and not afraid of the brave new world. They care not for the craftsmanship or are cowed by working long hours week after week after week, they don't want to learn about the designers who went before them and created new movements and new ways of looking at the world . . . and it shows in the vast middens of visual shite we wade through on a daily basis. Good luck them I say. Hand the torch over, watch as they chuck it over the hedge where the stella cans lie and run off onto the smog of electrons that has taken over the world. No worries, we're all full of shit too.

 

I don't hanker after some golden age of graphic design, that was long gone before I was at art school, but I do wish we had kept some of the skills our chosen career (it's not a profession any more) once had. That we still valued the things about design and animation that transcend the mere technology and made good commercial art what it was . . . in all it's varied and wonderful forms.

 

It's all transient. It doesn't matter in the great scheme. It's a distraction. There are far more important things. When you've had enough, go and do them.

Edited by zook

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It hasn't. I have one mate who's ten years older than I am and is still designing. His experience is unparalleled and his understanding of the areas he specialises in is absolute . . . but he's an exception. Why has this happened?

 

This is one of the most depressing posts I've ever read, and it's entirely true.

 

Can I just go ahead and blame Apple? Consumer is the new pro.

 

(I know it's not Apple's fault, they've had almost nothing to do with it, but they are capitalizing on it and doing everything in their power to make sure the industry keeps going in that direction.)

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It's all transient. It doesn't matter in the great scheme. It's a distraction. There are far more important things. When you've had enough, go and do them.

 

This sums it up nicely.

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It hasn't. I have one mate who's ten years older than I am and is still designing in his mid-fifties. His experience is unparalleled and his understanding of the areas he specialises in is absolute . . . but he's an exception. Why has this happened?

 

I was in the last year at my art school to be taught without using computers as a major part of the creative/production process and at that time ad agencies (about which I wholeheartedly agree with the monkey) and small design studios were full of older designers. Part of the education was leaving art school and being taught by these guys whom all had years of experience. I can remember being ripped to shreds by a 60-something typographer over some typography I'd designed for a brochure I was designing; I was mortified at the time but I came to realise how right he was, and I see work every day that must make him spit.

 

I can remember studios full of typographers, illustrators, visualizers, typesetters, finished artists, proof readers and graphic designers . . . and that was just a graphics studio. All of these skills were taught individually and valued, and all of them were far more involved than many today would ever believe they were.

 

When I left art school graphic design was a valued profession, and although you didn't have to get a qualification it helped if you went to an art school which was highly regarded locally. Leaving art school feeling like a fully-fledged designer many of us were thrown into a sort of second education, learning the ropes from the bottom up and starting (at least it felt like at the time) from scratch.

 

 

This whole structure seems to have disappeared as the technology has taken over. In many ways old scrotes like me hang on because of our extensive experience in a variety of disciplines. The people I know of my age who are still doing this tend to be highly experienced in a couple of specific areas and are regarded as a safe pair of hands. We've learnt not to bullshit, consider integrity as a designer fundamental and take an interest in developments in the field. So what? So do many newbies. Perhaps, but art schools now turn out kids who want to jump straight and not put the time in learning their craft. Did I say craft?

 

There is little craft left, and little respect for the craft such as it is from clients, project teams and those who commission the work, at least out here in the world of jobbing designers. The world has changed, spun a few more times around the sun. I mentioned Powerpoint before, but this genital wart of a programme is slowly destroying motion graphics as clients ignore pleas not to use it to structure storyboards, with them insisting on "doing it their way" despite the fact their way imposes all sorts of subtle and insidious subconscious limits on how animations and mograph projects are structured and developed. It's everywhere. It's foul, the antitheses of the creative process and the ability to think abstractly. It's a poor tool that's being used in tasks it was never designed for and is incapable of doing.

 

In many cases graphic designers are called in not for their creative input at the start of a project but to realise some bubble headed project assistant's or egocentric client's idea of how a video works. Eventually, the years of resisting the tide of mediocrity and indifference wears you down. I've seen it wear many down before me and like the OP it's wearing me too. I still love doing good design, good mograph and animation but many clients and their staff do not and are simply box-ticking (at best) and reflecting in your talent when it all works at worst. They're not interested in your opinion - just do the job for less, quicker and how I stay it should be done.

 

At the end of the day there are scores of young wannabes and hacks snapping at all our heels, competing for the same jobs (often undercutting to a ridiculous degree) and brimming with enthusiasm and not afraid of the brave new world. They care not for the craftsmanship or are cowed by working long hours week after week after week, they don't want to learn about the designers who went before them and created new movements and new ways of looking at the world . . . and it shows in the vast middens of visual shite we wade through on a daily basis. Good luck them I say. Hand the torch over, watch as they chuck it over the hedge where the stella cans lie and run off onto the smog of electrons that has taken over the world. No worries, we're all full of shit too.

 

I don't hanker after some golden age of graphic design, that was long gone before I was at art school, but I do wish we had kept some of the skills our chosen career (it's not a profession any more) once had. That we still valued the things about design and animation that transcend the mere technology and made good commercial art what it was . . . in all it's varied and wonderful forms.

 

It's all transient. It doesn't matter in the great scheme. It's a distraction. There are far more important things. When you've had enough, go and do them.

 

This brought a tear to my eye. Unfortunate but very true. There still seem to be a few studious out there preserving the craft and creating amazing work but one cant help but wonder how much longer will it last. In recent years more and more studios are going under. As the technology gets easier to use and more accessible who knows what is going to be left to our industry.

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