Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Kmksunfire

CREATIVE BREIF

Recommended Posts

I too wouldn't mind seeing some examples of "real world" prompts.

I imagine they vary from reams of detailed "roadmaps" to, "hey make something cool!"

@KmKsunfire: I'm sure the complexity & finesse is somewhat dictated by finances though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any body willing to modify or post some briefs they have recieved from clients? black out any key info to avoid pissing anybody off...

 

but think this is a huge opportunity to learn. I always find that I come up with ideas while writing my own brief, for lack of having one provided...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think the lesson to be learned from this thread is that briefs are a myth, just something to teach students at school.

 

In real life there are no briefs.

 

I honestly, can't remember actually ever getting a proper brief. its ussually just a conversation and then i assemble the brief myself from it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i think the lesson to be learned from this thread is that briefs are a myth, just something to teach students at school.

 

In real life there are no briefs.

 

I honestly, can't remember actually ever getting a proper brief. its ussually just a conversation and then i assemble the brief myself from it.

 

I dunno about this. For TV show stuff I often get written treatments, and when I deal with agencies and marketing types there is usually a written brief (can't really post anything becuase of NDA etc.) I agree though whether or not there is a brief it's the conversations with clients that are the most important. I think the value in a brief is kind of like a contract, especially if there are multiple decision makers involved, it's something you can point to as the agreed upon way to proceed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The way I'm (supposed) to work at the moment is: have conversation with client/producer, filter it, then send a bullet-pointed email back which they can then sign off. Sometimes I get a really good written document with everything I need on it, but most of the time you have to be ready to "manage expectations" and convert a rambling conversation into something useful.

 

@KMKSunfire one example from the briefs I get: "We need 14 variations on an 8 second animation with 3 seconds pre- and post-roll. The logo is here the colours are on this site and the font is comic sans. Oh, and make it edgy!"

 

The thing is, most of the time I'm doing fairly basic styleframes before I get a brief so that producers can go and pitch in a meeting.

 

Either that, or some variation of "You know that job X we did X years ago, well client Y likes it. How long will it take you to swap the logos?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i think the lesson to be learned from this thread is that briefs are a myth, just something to teach students at school.

 

I get written briefs for almost every project, but like anothername I am bound by NDA so I can't share, but they exist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cool.

 

well i don't believe you :P

 

I sometimes write them myself and then send em back for approval, but ive gotten pretty good at giving clients what they want.

 

as far as pointing to the brief and saying that wasnt in it, i guess you could do that, but you're probably not going to be working with that client again after doing that. Unless they just work with you because you're the cheapest.

 

edit: then again, what do i know, i just do 3d animation most of the time. =)

Edited by vozzz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
as far as pointing to the brief and saying that wasnt in it, i guess you could do that, but you're probably not going to be working with that client again after doing that. Unless they just work with you because you're the cheapest.

 

Again it might just be different work experience but this happens a lot, especially when there are several levels like studio, agency, marketing, execs. Sometimes you need to fight to keep a project on track and from descending into note hell, if you do it tactfully (and having a written brief can help with that) it can be seen as something positive you brought to the project not a negative.

 

I'm not talking about using a brief to argue about specific changes but just making sure the original tone and intent is preserved through the process and doesn't succumb to too many cooks syndrome.

 

You might be right though I don't really know about the jobs I may have lost by pushing back to keep a project on track.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

nah i always push to keep a project on track, but it generally sounds like this: "well thats a new request, we have to either to do that or that other thing you wanted, or do both, but neither will be as high quality" Or we need to push the timeline back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...