Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
seth_eckert

getting a new machine, love to hear any feedback / advice on this list

Recommended Posts

http://secure.newegg...Number=27840688

 

My main questions are:

  • Is 128 Ram overkill, currently I am just going to start with 64. I can foresee it being awesome for preview purposes in AE
  • I have read that your power source will loose its potency as years compound of 24/7 use. I would say my computer runs 120-130 hours per week currently but that is a 4 core machine. So with this machine I am at approximately ~650W needed so I am going with 800 just to be safe but also wonder if that is overkill.
  • Is SLI really necessary for video rendering? I like using only 1 screen so I dont see why I would really need that but its a cool upgrade option.

Thanks for your feedback in advance. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

good call on seperate devoted SSD

 

64MB RAM seems like a lot as it is, sorry can't give you a precise reason why, maybe just because the last few years i thought 12MB was a lot.

 

Not a fan of SLI, never hear good things aside from achieving similar benchmarks as non-SLI offers.

 

Couldn't you get away with a 700W pow supply and no liquid cooling? or is that all just because the price diff is no big deal?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

good call on seperate devoted SSD

 

64MB RAM seems like a lot as it is, sorry can't give you a precise reason why, maybe just because the last few years i thought 12MB was a lot.

 

Not a fan of SLI, never hear good things aside from achieving similar benchmarks as non-SLI offers.

 

Couldn't you get away with a 700W pow supply and no liquid cooling? or is that all just because the price diff is no big deal?

 

Yea I am excited to work off a SSD - sadly I have not in the past just because of fears of it failing and me being to poor to buy backups. I watched a friend of mine who has a SATA II drive and how fast everything turned on and I have just decided to go all out.

 

I am starting to agree with SLI not being a good idea, more I read about it more it seems like the payoff is not worth the pain in the ass.

 

I feel like I might be able to get away with 700 but check this out (http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp) after I read up on that and entered in everything I would just feel more comfortable with more, plus people say to not skimp on power plus I only spend an extra like 50 for piece of mind. This was the statement that made me decide the 800:

 

"Electrolytic capacitor aging. When used heavily or over an extended period of time (1+ years) a power supply will slowly lose some of its initial wattage capacity. We recommend you add 10-20% if you plan to keep your PSU for more than 1 year, or 20-30% for 24/7 usage and 1+ years."

 

Its at the bottom.

 

Thanks for the feedback man!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you add more hard drives and large graphics card (with 2Gb+ of RAM), you would need more power, so get a bigger, higher wattage power supply. They're relatively cheap and easy enough to replace, so it's not such a big deal to replace further on down the line. I upgraded my PC there in April and had been running the same 700w power supply since 2007 on 2 different machines with no problems.

 

64Gb RAM is loads for now; same as I've got in my PC at the moment, which is fantastic for AE running on a SSD. If you feel like stretching to 128Gb, go for it.

 

The processor seems expensive - is it top of the line at the moment? Pesonally speaking, when I buy stuff like this, I'll get 1 or 2 steps down from the most expensive, highest spec model as these are always the components which plummet in price a few months after release. If you want to overclock it, you'll need the liquid cooling and the higher wattage power source.

 

Graphics cards & SLI - can't say I know anything about this, so if you find out anything, let us know. However, go with one with at least 1.5Gb RAM & 450+ CUDA cores for use with C4D & Premiere Pro. The one on your wishlist should be ok, it's of identical spec to what I've got and I've had no complaints yet. You'll need to do a tiny modification on a .txt file to take full advantage of the mercury playback engine in Premiere, but it's super easy - check it out here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting a big power supply is a good idea. It doesn't just mean you can add more components without needing to upgrade the unit. It will be more reliable as it is under less strain at the same load. It you are rendering to client deadlines, saving a few bucks on a cheap power supply can be a monumental false economy. I've seen a few rendering machines die. Most were either power supplys that over-worked themselves to an early grave or components on a cheap motherboard that gave out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a fan of SLI, never hear good things aside from achieving similar benchmarks as non-SLI offers.

 

It just offers SLI - most cards do. Nowhere does it say that you have to use it. It's just one card, anyway.

 

Mylenium

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

650-800 watts on the PSU is kinda low. Go with a 900-1200 watt. Also, be sure to get a good UPS with battery backup.

 

The video card is not current-gen architecture. Get a 680 if you are able so you don't have to worry about updating your video card for a couple years.

 

You should get another SATA III SSD for your application cache. Photoshop, After Effects, AME all get a huge increase in speed when you set all of those to a fast SSD. Go with as big as you can. I only have a 60gb SSD and it fills every couple of hours. Right now I use windows automated tasks to keep formatting it. All of the applications will just delete the old, so it never just stops working, but I think it makes it slower.

 

No need to SLI at all, but perhaps a blackmagic HDMI out card so you can set up a preview monitor.

 

Always, always, always, have your non-SSD drives on a raid RAID 1 or higher. So.. just add a second one of those drives to the cart and RAID 1 it. Ideally, keep your project files / created content on a RAID 1 for disaster recovery and your easily re-ingestible media on a RAID 0 for speedy access to the high bandwidth source content.

 

You will likely want to throw a firewire 400 / 800 card in there eventually, and it will be an emergency when you do. Just go ahead and add it now.

 

If you are looking to shave some cost, come back a bit on the RAM. You can always upgrade that for cheaper in the future when more applications start going the load-all-session-media-into-ram route like the new ProTools.

Edited by AromaKat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

650-800 watts on the PSU is kinda low.

 

Maybe when you throw in all the stuff you suggested, but not the system as such. Most of the time it probably won't use more than 400 Watts, so even on a 650 W power supply there's headroom. Not plenty, but enough to serve as a decent safety margin. The real difference is efficiency. So if at all, get a Gold or Platinum class supply to turn less electricity into heat. And those better units are also much more forgiving in those marginal areas. Simple physics....

 

Mylenium

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • I have read that your power source will loose its potency as years compound of 24/7 use.

 

You'd have to use them for 30 years to really bomb out those thyristors, diodes and MOSFETs. I'd consider it a non-issue....

 

Mylenium

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're using CS6, the list of approved graphics cards is slim, and Nvidia only (thanks to CUDA) which means I'll be looking at getting a Quadro card in the next few years... OT: I found a custom laptop for 2 grand (quid not bucks) that has a mobile Quadro 2000 card in it. That and the ability to hold 32 gb of RAM. We're living in the future already...and it's probably dystopia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why Quadro? GTX benchmarks blow quadro out of the water for Adobe stuff. Quadro seems to only benefit heavy 3d / engineering (like solidworks) now.

 

The Asus G series are really nice. Just recently picked one up. You can get one with a NTSC calibrated monitor, gtx680m, thunderbolt, and 32 gigs of ram for cheaper than the new MBP while outperforming the MBP.

Edited by AromaKat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2nd what aromakat said. quadro waste of money unless you doing solidworks stuff, they used to be useful for 3d max, but i dont think thats the case anymore either. c4d def doesnt benefit from im.

 

also agree with the Asus G series. i have a g53sw. had it for a year. its a bit lower spec. than the new ones, but been working great. Buy ram separately tho, much cheaper. Only real issue with it, is that if you put it to sleep instead of powering it down, when you resume, after about 15-20 mins it kinda fucks up on you. But mine runs all day anyway, rendering or doing something else, so no big problem if you're using it that way. Also its kinda heavy, so not totally mobile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...