Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
eliss

3D Mouse

Recommended Posts

I was wondering if anyone on the forum has had issues with their shoulder when doing extended amounts of 3d work. I find with the constant clicking involved my shoulder starts to spazz out. I am looking into alternatives like a 3D mouse from 3Dconnexion.

Here is the one I'm looking at http://www.amazon.com/3Dconnexion-3DX-700040-SpaceMouse-Pro-Mouse/dp/B006H2RP12/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1363625305&sr=8-1&keywords=spacemouse+pro

 

Does anyone on the forum know if this would help?

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, this issue affects countless of us 3D artists and just about anybody at a computer these days. I've found that the best combination is a large ergonomic mouse and a Wacom setup. I got to a point where I was thinking about switching professions, but then I realized you just have to limit yourself to certain hours a day and good sleep. Workers comp doesn't even cover this anymore, too many people with these issues.

 

Love this mouse: http://www.amazon.com/Microsoft-Natural-Wireless-Laser-Mouse/dp/B000KA7PD0/ref=sr_1_3?s=pc&srs=2529902011&ie=UTF8&qid=1363627778&sr=1-3&keywords=microsoft+natural+mouse+7000

 

Lots of breaks and arm massages. Heating pad in the evening works great too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I second that mouse. It's the best mouse I've ever used. I have two of them--they make all the difference in the world. Tragically, it's been discontinued now. I have no idea what I'll buy as a replacement.

Edited by Aaron Scott

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use gaming mice. because well they are also designed for people spending lots of time at the computer. So far haven't had any issues.

 

I personally love the Razer naga, http://www.razerzone.com/gaming-mice/razer-naga

 

because it adds a bunch of buttons to the mouse which REALLY speed up workflow.

 

but they have some cheaper more classic, but also ergonomic mice that are great.

 

They are all fully customizable, dpi, sensitivity, acceleration. Its awesome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently read that when Pixar's ergonomics expert was asked what the best device was to avoid repetitive stress injury, her response was "the one you're not using now".

 

The point, of course, is that varying chairs, positions, pointing devices, keyboards, desks, et cetera will keep any one motion from being so repetitive that it causes repetitive strain injury. That's why I use a totally different setup in my home office compared with my Adobe office, and I even switch between mousing left-handed at work and right-handed at home. Since I made that last switch, I haven't had a single twinge (after being nearly incapacitated about ten years ago from overuse of my right hand for mousing).

 

Regarding the 3D Connexion device: We have thier SDK and have played with enabling it for After Effects 3D. Is that something that people would see much value in? If so, cast your vote here with a feature request:

http://www.adobe.com/go/wish

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought the 3DConnexion SpaceNavigator a couple of months ago. It works brilliantly well with Autodesk products, but for C4D it's a bugger to set up - it tends to be slow. It is perfect for Mudbox but is not supported by Zbrush at all, which means you still have to zoom away from your model to be able to revolve around it.

As for RSI it will not seriously impact your life because you still need your free hand for keyboard shortcuts, and you still to use need a mouse/tablet for pointing. I find switching between a tablet and a mouse frequently will ease the strains associated with either (anyone else got a Wacom callous on their middle finger?)

 

I can recommend the intuos 4 and 5 tablets as they have switchable buttons and wheels which keeps your hands near you and not contorting to hit key combinations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had really bad shoulder pain a few years back that eventually went down my arm and into my hand making it almost impossible to work.

 

Sorted it out with improving the overall ergonomics of my workstation, monitor height and all that stuff, big part of this was getting an Aeron chair, worth every penny.

 

Switched to using a wacom and also did some physio and learned a bunch of stretches I do periodically throughout the day.

Edited by anothername

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I fully recommend going the route of 100% use of an Intuos tablet. Many people where I work have complained about severe shoulder and elbow issues and have converted to using tablets and their work comfort has improved a great deal. I personally havent touched a mouse (aside from for playing Counter Strike) in over a year. I use my Intuos for everything and never have any issues what so ever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My shameful secret: I've never gotten used to using a tablet. I'm the only person here who uses a mouse.

 

I don't know why tablets are such a problem for me. I've been using tablets for ten years and they still drive me insane. I find it impossible to work with any sort of precision when I'm using them. Especially when I'm working in a program that requires me to click on tiny handles--I miss clicking on them more often than not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah i can't use a tablet for any productive work either. You're not the only one. I use em for photoshop and sculpting. But for general work in c4d. my productivity falls atleast to half if not less.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My shameful secret: I've never gotten used to using a tablet. I'm the only person here who uses a mouse.

 

I don't know why tablets are such a problem for me. I've been using tablets for ten years and they still drive me insane. I find it impossible to work with any sort of precision when I'm using them. Especially when I'm working in a program that requires me to click on tiny handles--I miss clicking on them more often than not.

 

I hear you man. The worst for me is working with bezier curves.. Also I have a 3 monitor setup...try drawing a circle with that much width spread across the tablet. Right now I use a mouse for most work, and I have the tablet mapped to my middle monitor for when I need to do some digital painting.

 

 

-Spunj

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hear you man. The worst for me is working with bezier curves.. Also I have a 3 monitor setup...try drawing a circle with that much width spread across the tablet. Right now I use a mouse for most work, and I have the tablet mapped to my middle monitor for when I need to do some digital painting.

 

3 monitors would be a little difficult, but I stick with the Intuos 3 wide for this very reason. I map the tablet to only use a narrow band, cropping the top and bottom of the tablet area to be a more proper dual monitor aspect ratio. Intuos 3 and 4 give me less vertical room when doing that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
robert_paulson.jpg


A tablet is much less of a strain on the body. It is frustrating as hell for the first week but if you go cold turkey on the mouse, the tablet eventually becomes like second-nature. Maybe it's different for different people but I could never go back to motion graphics with a mouse now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

3 monitors would be a little difficult, but I stick with the Intuos 3 wide for this very reason. I map the tablet to only use a narrow band, cropping the top and bottom of the tablet area to be a more proper dual monitor aspect ratio. Intuos 3 and 4 give me less vertical room when doing that.

This^^. It's the stretching of the mapping the Wacom tablet does by default that gets most people. I too, like to map the tablet properly to the monitors i'm using. I liked the Intuos 3 wide, but really disliked the pen. When a chance popped up for me to get the XL Intuos 4 at more that half off, I jumped on it. This thing can double as a table though....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

with my mouse if i move it between my thumb and pinkie fast enough if goes across the whole screen (acceleration), if i move it slowly it goes a couple of pixels over the same physical distance on the table. With a tablet i constantly have to move my whole hand. and over teh course of a day/week/month, thats a lot of time lost.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

+1 for a Wacom tablet. It saved my arm some years ago and today i'm almost unable to work with a mouse only.

I also like a mouse or touchpad for my left hand. But i disabled all the buttons & the touchring on my wacom because with my left hand at the keyboard, i often pressed them by accident.

Edited by levante

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can definitely relate on the struggles with tablet life. For the longest time it just felt so foreign to me. I had to go 100% cold turkey. It took about two weeks and now I couldn't live without. Ironically, I have been using a tablet for about 4 years now and I still cant draw/illustrate for shit with an Intuos. Something about not watching my hand and the fact that there isn't a 1:1 relationship between the display and surface. I had to get a Cintiq for all my drawing/cel animating needs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just started working with one of these 3d space navigator thingies, and holy moly I wish this had been on my desk long ago. I had to fux with the settings for a bit one by one to figure out how my brain expects it to work but once its set up its really natural feeling and I'm now whizzing around the viewport like a honeybee. Out of the box, it contols the camera but I found I like it better when its more like its controlling the stage and the camera is static - if that makes any sense.

 

I'm sure it can be mapped to be helpful in other apps too, but I just haven't gotten to it yet.

Edited by AromaKat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple years back I had some really terrible RSI that forced me to take time off work. I went to hand specialist and they gave me a series of exercises to do every couple hours. A few wrist stretches, but a lot of it was shoulder and back exercises. I alternated between mouse and wacom, but for me, posture was the core problem. Some people do fine with using just a mouse for their entire careers with little to no physical issues. I think this is an issue less about the actual device you're using and more about your overall ergonomics. Here's a couple important ones off the top of my head

  • Your monitor should be at eye level.
  • Your shoulders should be squared to your workstation, and your hands shoulder width apart.
  • Your elbows should be supported and around a 90 degree angle.
  • Your hands should be flush with your wrists. If they're at an angle above or below, you're likely putting unnecessary strain on them, especially in your idling moments.
  • Your feet should be flat on the ground, and your knees at approximately 90 degrees
  • Your back should be straight, and you should have back support to fall back on that lets you retain the above requirements

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...