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abraddock

Introduction via my Reel for 2015 - Alex Braddock

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Hello all,

I'm very new here, and new to the community in general. I wanted to post my reel, to see what people thought, understand where I'm coming from, but also use it as a chance to introduce my self. I'll post it now, so and blab afterwards:

 

 

A little about me: I studied film and video production in college, with every intention of being an editor, and down the line becoming a director. When I graduated, I had a rough time finding a job in the area I lived, and would spend half of my day sending out resumes, and the other half trying to learn something that would give me an edge: AE and C4D. I had used the programs in school, but there were no classes offered in the mograph world, nor animation(in the film department), so I had always been self taught.

Fastforward, I've now been working about 3 years in the MoGraph industry for the same tiny studio, constantly trying to throw in freelance where I can to offset the tedium of the "tech explainer videos" I make daily.

 

I would love any thoughts you have on how the reel is structured, the content of the reel, and to just to get to know people in this community. I just finished Binky's series on building a reel, and I already have a feeling mine breaks a couple rules (especially length). Speaking of length, I'll stop talking now. Cheers!

-Alex

 

Edited by abraddock

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Hello! Welcome to mograph, although I feel a bit silly saying that, as I haven't posted here in a while...

 

You are right about the length, reels need to be short not only to hold the viewers attention through to the end, but so that you've only selected the very best of your work to show. It appears on the face of it that you've put in a bunch of clips from your projects, then halfway through just decided to repeat it all and include very similar clips from the same projects.

 

There are some very nice snippets in there that look really good, but I hope you don't mind me saying they are spread out in between quite a lot of stuff that looks quite "student-ey", which really distracts the viewer from the nuggets of good work in there. My advice would be to really be brutal about them, remove the projects that aren't as visually pleasing and keep only the best of the best. Don't ever include something just because it's there.

 

Also, this might be personal preference, but I'm not a fan of sprinkling clips from the same project throughout, I prefer cutting them together so you see a few snippets of the same project side-by side. I will only ever re-visit a project under certain circumstances, perhaps in order to really get it working with the music.

 

Also, the music feels a bit pedestrian for the purpose. I'm not too good with music though, so I'd get another opinion on that. I just like to start and end with a bang, using your best/most dynamic work. Makes it more exciting and watchable.

 

I hope this is helpful for you.

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Hey JonnyB,

Thanks for the input! I agree, it's a bit of a mish-mash, and definitely repetitive. I also think your point about keeping works together interesting, as my approach was the exact opposite! I was worried the visual similarities of the shots would slow the pace or provide tedium, but I think that if I'm being 'brutal' as you said, that won't be an issue when the pace picks up and I'm only showing the best of the best.

Also, it's a shame you didn't like the song! I thought it was upbeat, and had an energy I liked. I wanted to avoid the same electro-pop feeling I see in a lot of reels. Would be good hearing another opinion about the song.

Thanks again for taking the time!

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Yeah, I'll take that about the music, oeuf is right.

 

I think that a lot of people would think the music on my reel isn't to their taste - I've had mixed responses for it but I figured it's the only time in my work I can use something that reflects my personality so I just ran with it.

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Hey Alex,

 

Right now you have a good grasp of the software and the workflow for Motion Graphics. In my opinion, the area you should work on the most is design principles. Study typography, composition, color theory, and for the time being you can embrace the explainer videos and convert them into your design training ground; focus on every frame and make sure to create a really solid and beautiful design.

 

I can see in your reel that you enjoy the technical side of things, and right now the temptation is probably to dig deeper into complex mograph arrays, dynamic simulations and render engines, and those are very important; but in Motion Graphics Design, design usually comes first.

 

I'm sure that when you have your design skills up to par with your technical knowledge, you will easily find more interesting projects.

 

 

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Agree 100% with your assessment of my technical vs. my design skills. I did not come from a design background, which I guess is more than evident in my work. I will say, in my defense, I have no desire to be an Art director or designer, and I do prefer the technical side of creating a scene, texturing, the animation process, and how to render it.

That being said, trying to sell myself as a freelancer, I'm doing myself a disservice by excluding that from my skill set.

Looking at this reel, I see it as a piece created out of frustration due to the work I was getting at a studio I used to be staff at. There's a poor balance of work I did in my spare time to vent my creative frustrations, and work I did under a director/producer who had no real vision, and it makes my reel feel like a pizza with all the wrong toppings.

 

I appreciate all the feedback, it seems like I have a long road ahead of me...

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It IS a long road, an endless road. But thankfully, it's a road you like walking. So it's less of a burden, and more of a challenge.

 

One thing I'll say quickly, is what you're already coming around to realizing, which is that art and design are going to be hugely important to what you do on the production side of things. And when it's not, you're going to be unsatisfied and reeeeeeeal bored, as you've found. So start taking every opportunity to soak in as much of that as possible. Look to traditional sources of knowledge on those subjects, and look at everything that inspires you and deconstruct it to figure out what makes it so good. The tools are important, but you can know how to use all of the tools in the toolshed and still not know how to make anything you love, which is frustrating. The more you understand the design side, the more empowered you are to make the things you really want to make.

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