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abraddock

Fulltime + Freelance on resumes?

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On my current resume, I've only really put places that I worked at for a significant amount of time, but should I be putting freelance projects on there too?

I work full-time at a studio currently, but as I'm looking for new work, my resume doesn't reflect jobs I've done outside of that.

Is there a good way to list projects in a separate section of my resume?

 

I know there are a lot of places that don't necessarily look at resumes anymore, mostly just reels and portfolios, but some places have asked for a resume, and I get nervous thinking it's a bit too thin...

Cheers!

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Under your freelance section list the studios/agencies your worked for and describe the kinds of projects you worked on (ads/promos/explainers etc.) and your role.

 

You might want to list what sort of clients you worked for, especially if they're high profile. Only list projects by name if they are relevant to the job you're applying for. Otherwise assume the person reading your resume won't know what you're talking about.

 

If you typically freelanced for long periods (3 months +) you might want to break it down in more detail, but I don't want to read a two page resume that lists every four week engagement over that period.

 

This comes from experience, it physically pains me to read my old resumes.. My current resume as well, truth be told.

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I think a resume for this work is really out dated but can see why people ask. Its more of a list of experience that you may not see on a reel. I would personally break it down by major contracts and skillsets and then add your client list and call it good.

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i do not interact with studio's which ask me for a resume... Its indicator of waay too much bureaucracy and probably gonna get a lot " our accounting department is having problems right now"..

 

you have a reel, and probably a good idea for a pdf with a breakdown of what you did on each shot. if you make the entire piece though i think you can get away without that too.

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dumb question but why do you need a resume?

 

I put one together before going freelance and in 2 and a half years have never needed it.

Some contract jobs ask for it. Places that have you work in house for a few months, like Facebook, Ubisoft, that aren't studios.

I definitely agree that resumes are dated, but businesses like that still need them, unfortunately.

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I wish I had the luxury of avoiding work, but I'm not quite at that level yet =\

It undoubtedly feels like that, but I think what's implied here (and it's true) is that companies that are asking for a resumé are hiring through their HR department, or something similar, which means there's a significant likelihood that you're asking to be placed at a company which is going to have very little concern for design or animation or art or whatever it is that you're interested in, and probably won't have attracted anyone else into the appropriate design/art departments to really mentor you well. And in addition to a paycheck, mentoring is what you want, right? You want to keep getting better, and to have the guidance you need to do that. You might indeed find that at a corporation, but it's iffy. You're not a seasoned pro, so the corporation that will hire you won't be an Ubisoft, it'll be some non-art related place in need of pre-branded ongoing collateral or something.

 

That's not the worst strategy, but you might also consider making the best reel and portfolio you can, in order to convince an art director at a dedicated studio that you're worth a shot. Right now your self-presentation is really lacking, and you could easily set your mind to making it a more compelling reason to hire you. Your site is kind of a shit show and your reel is unfocused on anything particularly valuable and is overcompensating by being waaay too long. You're being way too precious with your own work in the reel and presenting quantity over quality, which isn't a strategy that's ever going to work out in the long run. There are a lot of opportunities to rethink your whole presentation, at every level, including branding. And you might find that when your presentation is more compelling, you catch the attention of people who want you for your work, and not your work history.

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I don't mean that to be disheartening in any way. You like to make stuff, and this is an opportunity to make stuff that you really like, for yourself. But when you do so, to really pay attention to why you're making it and who it's for.

 

With regard to your site:

What information do potential employers want/need about you, and in which order do they want it? If your reel is the thing you really want them to see, should they have to search for your reel and click to get to a page where they can watch it, or should it be front and center? If you're going to have an "About" page, should it probably have something in it? Do you even need an "About" page, or do you think information like where you graduated is really necessary when they want you for the work that you do? (Honest question. People have differing opinions on this. I say work comes first and last and everywhere in between, but others might say there's value in providing some background information) Should your contact page be an ad for vimeo and facebook and linkdin? (No, it shouldn't. It should be about your info and your branding, not theirs) Should you have a blog associated with your portfolio if your blog is effectively inactive? (No, you probably shouldn't have it on your portfolio site, and if you're even going to mention it, it should probably be an exceedingly informative thing) Should you use a different navigational format on every single page? (No, obviously, you shouldn't. It should be cohesive and there should be a seriously streamlined approach to this whole thing. You're lucky to get someone to visit your site, so don't make them fish around and try to figure your shit out for you) What is this cube stuff about? It's not particularly meaningful, and not particularly attractive. It's generic and doesn't tell me anything about you. Are you a visual communicator? Do you like to make cool things? This suggests the opposite because it's not that cool and says nothing. That probably sounds harsh, until you really look at it as your audience looks at it, because your audience is a bunch of people who are looking to hire someone who makes super cool shit that's really compelling. You've got an entire universe of possibilities to play with here. Go wild. Do something you love. And remember that we have to love it too.

 

With regard to your reel:

I have a lot of the same advice to give you that I give other people, so i'm just gonna point you to this video series Building a Reel

Edited by Binky

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While it is disheartening to read about so many of your faults in front of you all at once, it doesn't make it any less useful to get that smack in the face.

What started as an experiment in web design quickly gathered dust. The reel side of it is another story, something I update more frequently. So it's definitely disheartening to hear that the way I am representing myself, what I have to offer, is no good.

But of course it's 100% better to hear it, and know it, than to continue the same course, thinking nothing's wrong and wondering why I'm doing so poorly in the field.

Thanks, and cheers.

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They're not faults, and what you're offering isn't "no good". You're just at that stage where you're being introduced to some new ideas and going "fuck, why didn't I think about that?" or "Shit, I don't even understand what that means yet." That's fine. Every one of us goes through that stage. It's how we get better. And better now than later.

 

You're also not doing "poorly" in the field. You just want to be doing better. Always doing better. And I'm pointing out things you're not thinking about that might help you get on track to doing better. Two guys trudging around in mud at the bottom of a hill: one of them says, "I'm up to my ass in mud, this is bullshit," while the other is looking up the hill saying, "I'm gonna get my ass up that hill in a hurry." Be that second guy. Forget that mud. Get your ass up that hill. Yeah, you're gonna fall. But fuck it, you're moving. And yeah, when you get to the top of that hill, you're gonna see a higher hill, and you're gonna want to take that hill. So take it.

 

So listen to the feedback, and figure out which parts of it are valuable, and which are kinda crap. Step back from your own work and look at it like someone you respect might look at it for the first time. And when you see it start to fall apart in front of your eyes, think about how much potential there is now to make it better. You were stuck in the mud before. Now you're free to bust out some cool shit.

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It undoubtedly feels like that, but I think what's implied here (and it's true) is that companies that are asking for a resumé are hiring through their HR department, or something similar, which means there's a significant likelihood that you're asking to be placed at a company which is going to have very little concern for design or animation or art or whatever it is that you're interested in, and probably won't have attracted anyone else into the appropriate design/art departments to really mentor you well.

 

Have to challenge Binky on this point – you can't disqualify a job on the basis they've asked for a resume. Large companies and corporations often have fair hiring policies that mean they can't hire you over a coffee and a hand shake and are obliged to screen resumes. That doesn't mean that HR are responsible for the final hiring decision without any regards to the quality of your portfolio, or that they don't have a fantastic in-house creative team producing great work.

 

So that really comes down to your research about the company whose job you're applying for. If it looks like a soulless corporate job devoid of creativity, then why are you applying for it in the first place? But if you're applying for a job at Time Warner, or Ubisoft, or wherever, then you'll probably have to play by the rules and provide a resume.

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In defence of resumes:

 

1. As mentioned if you want to work direct for client in particular at big gaming studios or places like that you need a resume. There are all kinds of laws etc. about discriminatory hiring that means they need to jump through the hoops to cover their asses no matter how badass you are. They are still hiring you based on your reel but you need the resume.

 

2. As a small shop owner I say cool you have a badass reel, but what are you like to work with, did you work for anyone I know so I can ask, did you use the same software we use to make all that cool shit, I know a lot about what you have handled in the past by the studios you have worked in, what kinds of studio cultures you have experienced etc.

 

3. Yes your reel is the most important thing, yes talking to you is important, but we're all busy and a nice simple well put together resume gives a clear bulleted list of notes to remind of who you are a couple months down the road after our chat when we actually need some new people, and gives me some things to ask about and some nice icebreakers for the conversation. To me providing me this in some form tells me you are thoughtful and considerate of my time.

 

Personally I prefer just a link to your linkedin assuming that is the most up to date version of your experience.

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Thanks for all this advice, guys! I'm seeing both sides of it, and what it sounds like in general is that it never hurts to have all assets well prepped, and that people most of all want to see experience, not just skill.

 

 

So listen to the feedback, and figure out which parts of it are valuable, and which are kinda crap. Step back from your own work and look at it like someone you respect might look at it for the first time. And when you see it start to fall apart in front of your eyes, think about how much potential there is now to make it better. You were stuck in the mud before. Now you're free to bust out some cool shit.

Honestly inspiring, thanks. Sometimes projects give me tunnel vision, and it's important to see your work in context, and from a different perspective. Next stop, marketing lessons!

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One thing I do like about a resume is that it's an opportunity to show off some type and layout skills in a different context. Same thing with business cards. I dont have either of those anymore though.

 

I'm glad DVDs are gone as well, but I do miss having a little branded kit of collateral that you could leave behind after an interview. Remember those cool little ejector DVD cases, oh and mini DVDs too!

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.............but I do miss having a little branded kit of collateral that you could leave behind after an interview. Remember those cool little ejector DVD cases, oh and mini DVDs too!

 

 

And auto-running interactive portfolios if you put the disc in a computer... Macromedia Shockwave Director, FTW!

Edited by AromaKat

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