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Guest Dean Velez

(OT) Post Magazine review

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Guest Dean Velez

Hi,

Please forgive me for this shameless plug, the Anvel just got reviewed in the July issue of Post Magazine and I wanted to share the story with the guys who might not get the magazine.

Thanks

Dean Velez

 

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VITAL STATS

 

Product: theANVEL Photoshop and After Effects Motion Graphics Training Series

Price: Subscription 299.00 USD inside the US, 349.00 International

Web Site: www.theanvel.com

 

-self-paced, broadcast-caliber projects

-training CDs with tech support

-all media assets included

 

 

The ANVEL Photoshop and After Effects Motion Graphics Training

 

As the cost of the technology associated with film and video production continues to decrease, new enthusiasts and professionals continue to enter the field. All these new users of media production technology have spawned a whole new industry…training materials.

 

As media professionals, we’ve all become eager consumers of our own wares…video and audio lessons or screen captures on CD, DVD, movies downloadable on the web all seem to be very popular these days.

 

That’s where Dean Velez’s ANVEL training series is different. No video. No sound. You’ll find simply PDF instructions that are well thought out and clearly communicated along with all the necessary assets to complete the project. At first, it seems almost a little disappointing. Where’s the animated open or the introduction to the philosophy of the author? As a DVD-based trainer myself, I wondered how well I might pick up the material in the ANVEL training CDs…

 

As it turns out…very well, thank you.

 

If you’ve ever viewed a training DVD or video, it can be very helpful to see what is actually being done as the instructor goes through the procedure. However, I’ve found over the years that I learn the very best when I have a project. Watching someone else do something to learn works pretty well, but actually doing it yourself is even better. ANVEL focuses on the doing.

 

Following the instructions on the PDF documents may feel like reading the manual to some (the nerve!), but the difference is that a manual teaches the reader the tools, whereas Dean teaches you technique. Each exercise reveals more about the seemingly endless depth of Adobe’s After Effects. Anyone who has become proficient with After Effects can tell you that there is nothing as good as experience. You need to jump in and start working to develop a feel for the software, even if it means simply training yourself through exploration. The drawback is that experimenting with After Effects by yourself simply won’t expose you to areas of the software that you don’t know exist. These tutorials present a goal…and the path to the goal leads the user through areas of the software that many new users (or experienced ones for that matter…) may not even know are there. I know every time I go to an After Effects seminar I realize there are still pieces of it that I haven’t really explored at all, and I have one of those “gosh” moments (…family friendly magazine…I never actually say “gosh” myself).

 

The projects themselves produce results that look ambitious. Even the first lesson utilizes a number of layers and effect techniques to produce a complex composition. These projects are based on various motion graphic techniques you might see on network television…the kind of stuff that motivates motion graphic artists to learn and continue to grow in their craft. When you get to the end of every lesson, you’ve not only been exposed to a tool or effect (or several of both) inside the software, you’ve actually picked up a technique, learned the thinking behind it, and executed it for yourself. Modern trends in motion graphics such as dimensional depth, simulated light emission, mattes, animated strokes and theme-inspired text design is all there. I can imagine a small market television station simply keeping the ANVEL series in house and training each subsequent artist as they arrive. The material is definitely network television inspired

 

The Anvel After Effects CD series is the only commercially available “curriculum” for After Effects that I’ve seen. It does an excellent job of ensuring hands-on experience as there are really no passive activities involved whatsoever. The projects are designed to look as if they were “ripped from the television network’s art department.” This isn’t surprising since Dean Velez has spent quite a bit of time in those very art departments. He’s taken his multiple Emmy Award-winning experience as a Cartoon Animator, Designer, and Art Director and created a truly self-paced training tool. Dean has taught in multiple settings including college courses and holds the rare qualification of being an Adobe Certified Instructor in Photoshop, Premiere Pro and After Effects as well as being a Certified Video Specialist Instructor.

 

 

The series subscription price is $299.99 for the United States and $349.99 (USD) for subscribers outside the U.S but is currently being offered at a discount of 199.00/249.00 (USD). All material on the CDs is royalty free and can be used on the air or the web and online tech support is available to subscribers. In addition to the training CDs, there are more companion discs in the series that include all the assets needed for each exercise plus additional assets. The material on these asset CDs ranges from footage to 3d elements to glows, and you’ll even find some workflow papers for those of us who are focused on taking these techniques and thoroughly understanding them.

 

 

Any television station or production facility with motion graphic artists who use Adobe tools would certainly benefit from this training tool, and the subscription cost is about the same as sending one person to a day seminar…and you take this training on your schedule.

 

An excellent product and an excellent value…I’m looking forward to getting through all the CDs myself.

 

 

Tim Kolb

Kolb Syverson Communications

kolb@kolbsyverson.com

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Guest noodles

awww man give us a brake.

 

Can we have a seperate place for these type of posts

I work in advertising so all I see is ads all day, I open my mailbox and all I get is junk mail (and bills), I check my emails, and what do I get...spam. I switch on the telly and what do I see....

 

I know your product is probably very good and legit and you're not trying to sell Viagra or something but please can we keep this kind of stuff from this board!

 

No disrespect intended

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Guest Dean Velez

No disrespect intended

36990[/snapback]

 

None taken, I'm sorry my enthusiasm got the better of me. This was not meant to be an ad, I take great pride in what I do and try very hard not to be a salesman. I was just very excited about this review.

Dean Velez

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Guest Sao_Bento

Not commenting specifically on Dean's article, but in the past 11 years that I have been reading POST, I can't remember ever seeing a negative review of anything. Most of the time the authors don't even know anything about what they're reviewing. They routinely demonstrate a lack of understanding of fundamental concepts like the difference between component VS. composite, etc. The average number of technical inaccuracies in that magazine must run into the hundreds per issue.

 

edit: at the rate people are getting into this field, it can't be long before Consumer Reports has an "After Effects Training" section. Your stuff will do good there too, Dean - and that will really mean something.

Edited by Sao_Bento

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Guest Dean Velez

edit: at the rate people are getting into this field, it can't be long before Consumer Reports has an "After Effects Training" section. Your stuff will do good there too, Dean - and that will really mean something.

37030[/snapback]

 

Dude, do you take pleasure in poking small children in the eye?...If you're going to say something mean just say it and don't beat around the bush.

"You don't consider the magazine's opinion to be relevant, therefore the opinions expressed on my materials mean nothing." If I'm taking this the wrong way excuse me but that's how I read it.

 

Dean

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Guest Sao_Bento

>>"You don't consider the magazine's opinion to be relevant, therefore the opinions expressed on my materials mean nothing." If I'm taking this the wrong way excuse me but that's how I read it.<<

 

That's not really what I mean. I'm saying that your stuff will most likely be well received, regardless of the venue - I haven't looked at it personally, but there's a lot of good buzz about your stuff. Getting excited that you're getting coverage is cool, but my point was that POST isn't really known as a trustworthy source of information when it comes to making decisions about buying stuff, so keep it in perspective (you wrote that your enthusiasm got the best of you). I'm sure you'll have positive DV Mag review too, those hold a little more credibility (depending on the author).

 

If you stick around long enough you'll see I have no problem telling people that something sucks, regardless of my perceived qualifications to do so. If I was gonna badmouth your stuff, I'd be making a serious case against it, rather than mixing it into a rant about POST.

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Guest Dean Velez
>>but my point was that POST isn't really known as a trustworthy source of information when it comes to making decisions about buying stuff, so keep it in perspective (you wrote that your enthusiasm got the best of you). I'm sure you'll have positive DV Mag review too, those hold a little more credibility (depending on the author).

37048[/snapback]

 

I do not want to keep this topic going, this is not what I intended by posting this. I do want to say that I disagree with you on my views of Post magazine and leave it at that.

 

I also would like it known that Tim Kolb the reviewer contacted me 6 months ago and has gone thru every CD that I had at the time as well as having a 2 hour phone interview with me concerning the CDs before ever writing the review. So I do feel very strongly that a lot of research went into this review.

 

As for why I am so enthusiastic about the review is that it's dead on with what the CDs are supposed to be, I could care less about the coverage. I've been doing this for a long time and I do not need my ego stroked by how many magazines I can show up in.

 

Again I apologize for posting this here. It will not happen again.

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