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interview advice

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Guest scott frizzle
Don't bring your girlfriend to the interview.

 

Ask Scott Frizzle. . .

 

or Ken Virgins @ ARtifact Design 

 

hehe

C

49024[/snapback]

 

Ha! Yes, Chad, that was a classic. Since you brought it up, I'll share with the group, and no, I am not making any of this up:

 

We had this kid coming on for an interview for an internship. We really didn't have anything open, but it was a favor for someone we knew in the biz. The kid rolls into the office looking pretty sloppy. Not that we had a dress code, but right off the bat he's giving a bad impression. He's got his girlfriend in tow. This was of course really lame, but we had a good sized office, and I figured she's sort of mill around in the lobby while we talked to the kid. Nope. We invite him in and she comes with him and they sit together on the couch. My partners and I all sort of exchange glances. We start to talk to the kid, and it's clear right away that he thinks very highly of himself. We show him our reel, and he doesn't seem very impressed. His strategy seems to be to convince us that he will take us to the "next level." I've already written him off as a tool, but we have to go through the motions. He brought a reel on a VHS tape which was sitting on the table in front of him. I say "let's have a look at your reel" and take the tape and go to put in in the machine. He snatches the tape from me like it's his child and says "better let me do that." At this point it's become pure comedy. He puts in the VHS tape and grabs the remote. An episode of "Days of Our Lives" appears on the TV. He looks a little confused. He starts shuttling around the tape; he clearly can't find his work on it. An exruciating amount of time goes by before he finds his work. Finally, he stands back and plays the "reel." It's about 30 seconds long, comprised of four really bush league student projects. The work is poor, even for someone just starting out. We ask him to talk about the work, and he's still arrogant, comparing some of his projects to things on our reel like they're on the same level. My partners and I are trying to help the kid since he's a relative of someone we know in the biz. We tell him that he needs to look for an internship where he can hone his skills. He'll have none of it, and treats us like we're nuts for not offering him a Design Director job on the spot. He goes off on this story about a guy he worked for who did wedding videos. He said "I learned Premiere and basically saved the company." Well done. We conclude the interview, and he asks if he can use the phone. We say fine. He gets on the phone, and with all of us right there, calls and gets directions to his next interview. At this point we're having a hard time holding it together. He finally walks out with his girlfriend, and one of my partners can't stand it any more and goes out and lets the guy have it, although constructively. The kid again would have none of that, and left giving the impression like we missed some huge opportunity by not hiring him.

 

So, to those of you going to an interview: don't dress like a slob, don't bring your girlfriend, don't have anything else on your reel except for your work, cue up your reel, make sure your work isn't terrible, show your potential employer some respect, don't be arrogant, get the address for your next interview before going to the first one, and thank the employer for the opportunity even if you think they suck.

 

If you follow those simple guidelines you'll get the job and probably save the company.

;)

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Guest Sao_Bento

And now that guy's wearing $200 jeans . . .

 

 

Ha!  Yes, Chad, that was a classic.  Since you brought it up, I'll share with the group, and no, I am not making any of this up:

 

We had this kid coming on for an interview for an internship.  We really didn't have anything open, but it was a favor for someone we knew in the biz.  The kid rolls into the office looking pretty sloppy.  Not that we had a dress code, but right off the bat he's giving a bad impression.  He's got his girlfriend in tow.  This was of course really lame, but we had a good sized office, and I figured she's sort of mill around in the lobby while we talked to the kid.  Nope.  We invite him in and she comes with him and they sit together on the couch.  My partners and I all sort of exchange glances.  We start to talk to the kid, and it's clear right away that he thinks very highly of himself.  We show him our reel, and he doesn't seem very impressed.  His strategy seems to be to convince us that he will take us to the "next level."  I've already written him off as a tool, but we have to go through the motions.  He brought a reel on a VHS tape which was sitting on the table in front of him.  I say "let's have a look at your reel" and take the tape and go to put in in the machine.  He snatches the tape from me like it's his child and says "better let me do that."  At this point it's become pure comedy.  He puts in the VHS tape and grabs the remote.  An episode of "Days of Our Lives" appears on the TV.  He looks a little confused.  He starts shuttling around the tape; he clearly can't find his work on it.  An exruciating amount of time goes by before he finds his work.  Finally, he stands back and plays the "reel."  It's about 30 seconds long, comprised of four really bush league student projects.  The work is poor, even for someone just starting out.  We ask him to talk about the work, and he's still arrogant, comparing some of his projects to things on our reel like they're on the same level.  My partners and I are trying to help the kid since he's a relative of someone we know in the biz.  We tell him that he needs to look for an internship where he can hone his skills.  He'll have none of it, and treats us like we're nuts for not offering him a Design Director job on the spot.  He goes off on this story about a guy he worked for who did wedding videos.  He said "I learned Premiere and basically saved the company."  Well done.  We conclude the interview, and he asks if he can use the phone.  We say fine.  He gets on the phone, and with all of us right there, calls and gets directions to his next interview.  At this point we're having a hard time holding it together.  He finally walks out with his girlfriend, and one of my partners can't stand it any more and goes out and lets the guy have it, although constructively.  The kid again would have none of that, and left giving the impression like we missed some huge opportunity by not hiring him. 

 

So, to those of you going to an interview: don't dress like a slob, don't bring your girlfriend, don't have anything else on your reel except for your work, cue up your reel, make sure your work isn't terrible, show your potential employer some respect, don't be arrogant, get the address for your next interview before going to the first one, and thank the employer for the opportunity even if you think they suck. 

 

If you follow those simple guidelines you'll get the job and probably save the company.

;)

49059[/snapback]

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Guest krpdesign

do what "spud" from trainspotting did...

 

take a little finger dip of speed and fuck it up proper

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Guest ONA1R Studios
do what "spud" from trainspotting did...

 

take a little finger dip of speed and fuck it up proper

49067[/snapback]

 

Nice One! :D

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Guest Beaver

I had two interviews out in LA when I was fresh out of school. I didn't have a chip on my shoulder as big as the kid in Scott's story, but I definitely thought I was hot stuff. I interviewed at Pittard Sullivan with Curt Doty (a pretty intimidating looking dude) and he politely told me that I wasn't capable of working there. Second interview was at Belief with Mike Goedecke. I think Mike felt really bad for me because I was obviously really green, and pretty confident that I was Belief material.

 

I think it's easy for newcomers to think that way, especially coming out of new media schools. The schools don't prepare you at all, but fill your head with the idea that you're going to be working at the hottest shop in LA or NY as soon as you graduate. I don't know if that was the case with Scott's guy, but sounds like it.

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Guest scott frizzle
I had two interviews out in LA when I was fresh out of school.  I didn't have a chip on my shoulder as big as the kid in Scott's story, but I definitely thought I was hot stuff.  I interviewed at Pittard Sullivan with Curt Doty (a pretty intimidating looking dude) and he politely told me that I wasn't capable of working there.  Second interview was at Belief with Mike Goedecke.  I think Mike felt really bad for me because I was obviously really green, and pretty confident that I was Belief material.

 

I think it's easy for newcomers to think that way, especially coming out of new media schools.  The schools don't prepare you at all, but fill your head with the idea that you're going to be working at the hottest shop in LA or NY as soon as you graduate.  I don't know if that was the case with Scott's guy, but sounds like it.

49072[/snapback]

 

Yeah, you see a lot of that. Confidence is a good thing, but there's a fine line between confidence and arrogance. I always liked the confident guys who didn't pour it on too much. Some were so into the "sale" of themselves they didn't stop and think what would happen if they got hired. We had one intern for a while that sold himself big time. Said he "rocked" after effects. We gave him a shot, and when he had to build something in AE, he fumbled around for a few minutes, and then said "could you remind me how to create a new project?" Clearly he'd never even done the tutorials. He didn't last long. ;)

 

You're right about the current crop of new media schools. I used to see so many kids that expected to make 80K with full creative control of their projects right out of the gate. A lot of that went down the drain with the 90's .com crash, but you still see it. I don't think I've ever seen a design school that couldn't use a lot of work in the "prepare them for the real world" department.

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Guest fredcamino
Yeah, you see a lot of that. Confidence is a good thing, but there's a fine line between confidence and arrogance. I always liked the confident guys who didn't pour it on too much. Some were so into the "sale" of themselves they didn't stop and think what would happen if they got hired. We had one intern for a while that sold himself big time. Said he "rocked" after effects. We gave him a shot, and when he had to build something in AE, he fumbled around for a few minutes, and then said "could you remind me how to create a new project?" Clearly he'd never even done the tutorials. He didn't last long.

 

i've always kind of had that problem. i have always been really into self-promotion (clearly) and take great pleasure in it, but often wonder if i'll actually be able to handle the work if i got hired. luckily im pretty okay at bullshitting my way through stuff i don't know how to do, so it hasn't been a problem yet, but i'm sure it'll bite me in my ass soon enough.

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Guest scott frizzle

OK, I have to share one more story while we're on this topic. Another interview classic:`

 

A guy contacts me looking for a job. I'm nice to him, but tell him we don't have any positions available. He calls again in about 3 days "just checking in." I politely tell him we still don't have anything available, and that I'll let him know if something comes up that suits his qualifications. He proceeds to call me every week, just seeing how things are going. I decide to go ahead and have the guy come in for an interview, thinking that would satisfy him (stupid.) He comes in. Nice enough guy, so so work. Worst damned breath I've ever experienced on a biped, but I gave him the benefit of the doubt; maybe it was a bad day. Still, I was leaning backwards in my chair trying to get some distance from the source. The interview concludes, and I reiterate the fact that we have nothing for the guy at this time. He calls 2 days later. I get a little steamed at him, and tell him that I will contact him if something comes up, and that he does not need to keep calling. A few days later, he stops by the office unannounced. Someone else at the office intercepts him. I tell them to tell the guy that I'm in a meeting and can't talk with him. He leaves and comes back in about a half hour. I lose my shit. I confront the guy and tell him that he cannot call anymore, and he cannot just stop by when he feels like it, and that he needs to leave immediately. He says ok, with no real reaction. Then he says "I brought these for you." He's holding a box of Krispy Kreme donuts. I'm totally freaked out at this point. Just when I think it can't get any more twisted, he says "I killed a couple of 'em though." Sure enough, I look in the box and he had eaten two of the six donuts. The guy brought me a partially eaten box of donuts. I bid him farewell. I threw away the donuts.

 

I will never be the same.

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Guest seabass
I interviewed at Pittard Sullivan with Curt Doty (a pretty intimidating looking dude)

49072[/snapback]

 

I wonder if I met you or saw your reel back then.

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Guest jasfish
Then he says "I brought these for you."  He's holding a box of Krispy Kreme donuts.  I'm totally freaked out at this point.  Just when I think it can't get any more twisted, he says "I killed a couple of 'em though."  Sure enough, I look in the box and he had eaten two of the six donuts.  The guy brought me a partially eaten box of donuts.  I bid him farewell.  I threw away the donuts.

49091[/snapback]

 

hahaha .. that's awesome!

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Guest jasfish
The kid rolls into the office looking pretty sloppy.  Not that we had a dress code, but right off the bat he's giving a bad impression.  He's got his girlfriend in tow.

49059[/snapback]

 

Maybe it wasn't his girlfriend .. maybe it was his posse ;)

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Guest fredcamino
Sure enough, I look in the box and he had eaten two of the six donuts.  The guy brought me a partially eaten box of donuts.  I bid him farewell.  I threw away the donuts.

 

I will never be the same.

49091[/snapback]

 

hey, i was hungry! i didn't want the job anyways.

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Guest scott frizzle
hey, i was hungry!  i didn't want the job anyways.

49105[/snapback]

 

Fred, this is funnier than you think. Suffice it to say that it would be very difficult for the guy in the story to look any less like you. ;)

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Guest Beaver
I wonder if I met you or saw your reel back then.

49093[/snapback]

 

Yeah, maybe, I got the "tour" and shook hands with a lot of people. That building was really tight. Funny that Media Temple is there now, and that's who I host with.

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