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Guest christianchoice

For Thos of you Worried about not having a degree

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I went to a "fine art" school. Not a "design" or "commercial art" school. I have to say that my senior film was nothing short of pure bullshit. Hence, my move into design.

 

I actually studied filmmaking, not animation. I am self-taught at that, which is why it has taken me so damn long to start doing 3D.

 

the education I got was absolutely the best that money could buy. I don't regret it for one second...and I'll be paying for it the rest of my life.

 

Be Cool. Stay in School!

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I have a computer science degree.....

I wish I went into a design program instead.

But then again, by the time I wanted to change my field, it was too late(I had enough credits to graduate and my loans were adding up).

I guess, school major aside, you do learn something on a subconscious level...know what I mean?

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As a holder of a BFA and MFA in design and computer graphics design, school is most definitely not a waste of time, or money.

 

That said, this industry and most in general, are kind to those with and without degrees, as long as you have skills, and desire.

 

Straight up, if you got what it takes, a piece of paper don't matter.

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www.jonahtreestudios.com/THE TOY UNIVERSE.mov

 

its 30 mbs & is a QT7 (H.264)....the quality is ok, but its the best i could do seeing the whole project is 5 minutes long.... i think Bret's (this one) is probably the best (most thought out???) project to come out of his half of the class.....

I went there and got tons of pop up windows and spam........

 

 

the key words here being "design program". I'm always jealous of the guys that actually took design at a reputable college. I think in this business media/film courses are almost always a waste, but a solid education in design seems priceless. I know I'd be much better off with one.

 

I completely agree. I did get a degree in "Digital Media", which taught how to use the software and the technical side of things but nothing about design. The school has recently changed the name of the degree to Digital Arts, although the course is the same. I suppose the point I am trying to make here is that you really have to figure out what is best for you. If you have been playing with Photoshop / Design since you were a kid and have pretty solid art skills I would suggest that you go with the more technical side. If you are bad ass with computers and have just dabbled in art, or just intrigued in motion graphics, I suggest the design school, as you can more than likely get a good grasp of the software on your own; with heavy self teaching, research, and practice of course. I personally wish I had chosen NYU or Savannah because of the focus on the "science and theory" of design; leaving what you do with it up to you after introducing you to the various software and mediums available. I have also noticed that out of my class, we were visibly broken up into two groups. A group of those that were paying for it on their own, and a group that used the college money their parent's saved up on something that seemed like a cool thing to get into. The latter were living up the "college life" more, just trying to pass each class at a time and ended up with only a piece of paper to show on graduation day. Not all... But most.

Edited by AromaKat

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Guest Sao_Bento
A college degree is an investment in yourself, which has returns that surpass a job or piece of paper.

Schools don't make or break you. It's a great chance to learn somethings, but don't make the mistake of thinking a degree gets you out of proving yourself. If you can learn on your own, you will learn in school. If you aren't trying to learn on your own, a school can't help you.

 

With an MBA you'll get a job and make good money. With an art school degree, you aren't guaranteed a job or any money at all.

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If I can tell someone hates school with a passion, but looks like they could handle the craft of what we do, I tell them fine, who needs college? Just don't ever think it's an option to be a slacker, because those days are over once you're actually working. I respect all the people I know who didn't get four-year degrees of any kind and yet succeed wildly at being an animator or designer. It's almost more pure in a way for them. They didn't need to get it drilled into them to know what it would take to succeed. I know a few of these types now. Anyway, I did enough years in college for two people, so if one less person goes, the world's in balance.

With an MBA you'll get a job and make good money.

When's that supposed to happen? I got mine in 1994 and haven't made a dime off it since the market crash of March 2000. :D

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I did a 4 year "audiovisual design" bachelors degree, and while I won't say it was useless, in hindsight I find that the school never really taught me much in the way of design. It's really more that you get 4 years to try and do your thing and learn by yourself. Problem with that is of course that not everyone is equally good in the self-motivational department, esp in their wild student years :)

There was very little actual design being taught, nor any really good technical stuff (I pretty much learned AE by myself using books). The whole thing was just so broad that nothing seemed to be taught really in-depth). There was some decent work coming out of the senior year but also a lot of really mediocre stuff. In hindsight, I wish I would have done graphic design instead and then would have been able to apply those skills to motion design. Now I feel like I'm pretty good technically with AE and I can make stuff that look decent, but am missing a lot of fundamental design sensibily.

In the end, I think school can work well for providing an environment where you can practice and hone some skills, develop some work and your own style, but it's only as good as the amount of work you put into it yourself.

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Anyway, I did enough years in college for two people, so if one less person goes, the world's in balance.

 

I'll raise you - I did enough for 2.5. I can also state that I have derived no direct financial benefit from my education since I did a bit of teaching about 15 years ago (my subject was music). I don't regret starting off somewhere else. Anyway none of this stuff existed in 1986 when I started at University.

 

Is anyone else prepared to own up to a start in a non-design field?

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I'll raise you - I did enough for 2.5. I can also state that I have derived no direct financial benefit from my education since I did a bit of teaching about 15 years ago (my subject was music). I don't regret starting off somewhere else. Anyway none of this stuff existed in 1986 when I started at University.

 

Is anyone else prepared to own up to a start in a non-design field?

 

I graduated with a degree in music and audio engineering. I spent my 20s doing studio engineering, but I got tired of competing with $10/hour studios. Not that I want to be a millionaire, but it's just a ridiculously poor field of work. I gradually shifted from studio engineering to audio post, then found I had a knack for editing, then got burnt out on editing. By 33 I am a mograph artist and.. oddly enough.. training other artists how to do this. Life is weird.

 

I figure maybe in another 10 years I'll get burnt out again and become a sous shef or something.

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I think college is where you learn HOW to learn. I graduated with a degree in Telecommunications (basically audio/video production), but a year out of college realized

that mograph is what i wanted to do. Like others on here, I wish I had come to that realization earlier and gone to school for design. But I continued to teach myself

AE and C4D as well as design fundamentals through books, online, and interacting with mograph superstarz on this forum.

 

I wouldn't ever tell someone not to go to college. If for nothing else just to be a kid for 4 more years rather than growing up too fast. But if you got the skills and

desire to get in this industry I guess there's no better time than now.

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I totally agree with that. that's the key.

It's a time to create and hone your critical thinking and problem solving skills.

Also, 6 hour crits blow, but you become adept at giving and receiving constructive criticism, etc.

 

Hate to say it, but the end result is probably just a little higher level of sophistication when it comes to professionalism.

 

There are, of course, always exceptions though.

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With an MBA you'll get a job and make good money.

 

An MBA gets you lots of tail too. Oh, wait, no, that's the money.

 

With an art school degree, you aren't guaranteed a job or any money at all.

No...but my BFA guaranteed me a pretentious attitude that is unparalleled. Not to mention popularity with friends who need creative projects done for free.

Edited by Firebetty

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I saw hundreds and hundreds of resumes from people fresh out of school (or even not so fresh out) and it was clear that school hadn't prepared then for the field.

 

"OBJECTIVE: Use design to broaden my perspectives and challenge the public's conceptions of design in a post-modern, pre-apocalyptic world-construct"

 

Stuff like that was rampant, and good reels were few and far between. If school helps you develop talent you've already got and prepares you for REAL WORLD design challenges, I'm all for it.

 

Mostly I saw graduates with a huge sense of design-entitlement and a degree in snobbery.

 

I stopped reading resumes. If the resume didn't include a demo, I didn't read it, and if the email didn't include a link to their reel, I tossed it (with a few exceptions).

Everyone else has said it already: your work is the only thing that ultimately matters.

 

-----------

 

The only place I could see a lack of school being a liability is if you were to go for a management position at a network, or a teaching position. They seem to want to see that piece of paper that proves your worth.

 

-s

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I've recently graduated from a 2 Year College Course in Canada. The course was broken down like so:

 

Three Streams: Web, Animation, Video

 

- First Year, we take illustration/design courses (Drawing, Design/Color theory, etc.), software classes (photoshop, illustrator, ect.), as well as classes from all three streams (html/css, animation(maya) class, and video(final cut/shooting/filmmaking) class. It's absolute hell, but was super fun.

 

- Second Year, you take a major (One of the Three Streams)

Web Students learn Open Lazlow

Animation Majors learn Maya

Video Majors learn After Effects

 

We still take some web classes, and some visual effects classes, but its mostly focused around your major. Still hard work, but not as bad as the first year.

 

- There is a third year for Animation majors, they go into other programs and such.

 

I learned quite a bit from my college experience, and don't regret it at all. I kinda wish I had taken a full graphic design course beforehand, simply to get better at design, but theres time to learn that stuff still without more schooling (just more practice!) The kind of work produced by myself and my classmates varied greatly from student to student. Some produced great work, some not. It really depended on how much you put into it.

 

One thing that people in Canada may want to be aware of is that, you CANNOT get a WORK VISA for the U.S. unless you have a degree, or are a recognized expert in your field (won awards and such). So for new diploma grads like me, I'm staying here for a while. I'm not sure how it works with traveling to other countries.

 

I'm waiting to start working at a really good job right now, during the interview we went over my demo reel in detail, and only talked briefly about my course.

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anyone has any idea of getting a degree with experience and showreel as credentials?

You will need to become famous first...then schools will be banging down your door to offer you an "Honorary PhD" and the like. Yoko Ono got hers from my school the year I graduated. Let me tell you...after busting my ass for 4 years, the last thing I wanted to see was some famous person get literally HANDED a degree for just doing the wacky art she had always done.

 

I was so proud of my mom...who ran into her in the hall...she said. "I've always been a big fan...of your husband's music"

 

:lol:

Edited by Firebetty

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You will need to become famous first...then schools will be banging down your door to offer you an "Honorary PhD" and the like. Yoko Ono got hers from my school the year I graduated. Let me tell you...after busting my ass for 4 years, the last thing I wanted to see was some famous person get literally HANDED a degree for just doing the wacky art she had always done.

 

I was so proud of my mom...who ran into her in the hall...she said. "I've always been a big fan...of your husband's music"

 

:lol:

 

Damn, that's inspired. I'm proud of your mom.

 

And I've always been a big fan of earning your credentials. I also think talent isn't worth jack until it's packaged with technique.

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