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Guest PlayingKarrde

Advice on camera moves

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When I was using 3ds Max, I would parent the camera to a null. I would then add a 'spring controller' to the camera. This basically allowed it to lag and then come to rest (dampening, strength, etc.) Messing with the controls would give me a virtual steady cam. Then, I would move the parent null in 'step' keyframes (snap movement). The cam would slowly ramp up to speed, then come to rest with a subtle ease and overlap. I recently saw a tutorial for C4d (which I use now) that uses a delay effector using either 'spring' or 'blend' as the mode. Blend does a better ease in/out. Spring mode is better for character cam moves.

 

Check it out.

 

Just substitute a camera for the box.

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When I was using 3ds Max, I would parent the camera to a null. I would then add a 'spring controller' to the camera. This basically allowed it to lag and then come to rest (dampening, strength, etc.) Messing with the controls would give me a virtual steady cam. Then, I would move the parent null in 'step' keyframes (snap movement). The cam would slowly ramp up to speed, then come to rest with a subtle ease and overlap. I recently saw a tutorial for C4d (which I use now) that uses a delay effector using either 'spring' or 'blend' as the mode. Blend does a better ease in/out. Spring mode is better for character cam moves.

 

Check it out.

 

Just substitute a camera for the box.

 

That's a fantastic idea. That being said I would also try the regular spring constraint as well. The spring constraint doesn't need to be cached to be predictable. It responds better for me than the delay effector in mograph for this kind of thing. That being said I haven't messed with the delay effector in a version or two and they may have fixed the weirdness I was getting with it.

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Being a good photographer need to know what camera movement you are talking about because i know about the camera angles and degrees.

 

can please to give me angles and degrees of 4th dimensional inversion photography movements for me thanks, please!

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That's a fantastic idea. That being said I would also try the regular spring constraint as well. The spring constraint doesn't need to be cached to be predictable. It responds better for me than the delay effector in mograph for this kind of thing. That being said I haven't messed with the delay effector in a version or two and they may have fixed the weirdness I was getting with it.

 

 

D-oh, I put the wrong URL in the link above...

 

http://vimeo.com/7239147

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If you want to add some real-looking camera shake, let go of the wiggler, just shoot a blank sheet of paper with a point drawn on it. While shooting just shake the camera with the style you want, then import the clip into after effects, track the point and use the generated keyframe to add shake to the AE camera. If you need consistent rotational shake, just use two points and then track also for rotation.

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I like to make a null a distance away from the camera and parent the camera to it. This makes matrix-like moves much easier than trying to keyframe the camera itself. Just rotate the null and boom. In fact, I cant remember the last time I actually keyframed a camera.

 

This is what I do as well!my process is :1) connect to null2) set first and last key frame3) find area in the middle that I need the camera to hit a certain mark and finesse the ease on the intermediate key framescamera movement is an art of it's own! a lot of times things will get screwed up and you are better off starting over than trying to fix the mess that has been created.

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I like to make a null a distance away from the camera and parent the camera to it. This makes matrix-like moves much easier than trying to keyframe the camera itself. Just rotate the null and boom. In fact, I cant remember the last time I actually keyframed a camera.

 

This is what I do as well!my process is :1) connect to null2) set first and last key frame3) find area in the middle that I need the camera to hit a certain mark and finesse the ease on the intermediate key framescamera movement is an art of it's own! a lot of times things will get screwed up and you are better off starting over than trying to fix the mess that has been created.

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I feel like I am constantly relearning how to use the camera in both After Effects and Cinema 4d. I've been in situations where a camera animation can be done in anywhere from 10 minutes to a week. It really just depends on the scene and the complexity of the move. I personally don't use any third part tools or rigs but I appreciate that there available and will hopefully have the time to learn them some time. I think the one thing that is constant between whatever one has said here and from my own experience is that it's really important to keep the keyframes to a minimum. I always use a null as well so the camera is never actually keyframed. Best of luck everyone.

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steadycam pro from tca studios is a free plugin for c4d. i really fell in love with that rig. it takes some time to get used to but it just kicks ass then.

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