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Transitioning to another career


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#21 jblessing

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 12:27 AM

i dont understand how or why people want to leave mograph....

 

And the great thing is this is all cumulative. You learn something, you change direction and the stuff come back in unexpected way.

 

I think mograph is a great first career. It exposes you to a lot of other people and business types.

 

Mograph as a business, as it currently is in the US, is terrible. The business model, along with what este.eri said, sucks. The overall situation still continues to get worse. I see no sign on the horizon of it improving either.

 

For some of us, pushing pixels all our lives might be enough. Hey it is a relatively easy living and at the end of the day you have made other people's ideas prettier. Where would we be without pretty ads or shows?


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#22 anothername

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 01:49 PM

I think mograph is a great first career. It exposes you to a lot of other people and business types.

 

Yeah it's funny even in Vozz's response you can kind of see that in all the way he is branching off the possibilities of mograph, it's more of a starting point than an end point.

 

I really feel like the term motion graphics is almost becoming meaningless, now that it's so main stream and intermeshed with VFX and the rest of post in general.

 

I'm interested to see where it all goes in my little end of the globe I really feel like I am witnessing the death of the agency which is quite painful right now (at least for my business), as well as a general move to quantity of media vs. quality, but could end up being really beneficial in the long run (e.g. smaller budgets but mograph shops are direct to client so agency has no cut).

 

At my shop we've started developing some of our own content/IP to try and monetize that, as well as partnering with some technology companies to develop products. So I'm still loving "mograph" but it's definitely not the old pure service model of mograph (although we still mostly pay the bills with that), it's definitely fun, still too early to say if it will actually be financially viable.

 

I'm definitely in a place of being burned out on what mograph was for me, and a lot of that has to do with the brutal business model, but I'm loving the process of taking what I've learned and trying to re-invent my business and exploring what I can do with that but only time will tell if it actually works.



#23 vozzz

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 03:19 PM

But what are the better options out there?

 

and yes, by mograph, i don't mean purely animating typographic design, by mograph i mean animation of all types and flavors, with a target towards the advertising industry.

 

I personally can't work on feature films, they would just bore me to no end working on the same project for years. And then getting screwed over by the studio... no thanks =)

 

But doing stuff for tv is great, everything is relatively short, there is heaps of variety. In the last 3 months, ive worked on airplanes, dolphins, water sims, cartoon parrots, new deco style set design, horses on a looping track and then some particle animations to top it all off. Where else is there going to be that much variety?


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#24 este.eri

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 02:26 AM


 

I'm definitely in a place of being burned out on what mograph was for me, and a lot of that has to do with the brutal business model, but I'm loving the process of taking what I've learned and trying to re-invent my business and exploring what I can do with that but only time will tell if it actually works.

 

 

Same here. I've worked with networks and agencies of all levels. That experience has to be put to use. I think creating your own content is a really good way to go.



#25 Beaver

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Posted 13 February 2015 - 12:08 PM

I got so burned out I went into accounting. What was always draining for me was the need to be creative "on demand" for whatever job. Some people have an amazing ability to do that but I can't. I switched to a field where it's more about problem solving; where progress is more quantifiable, and I'm really enjoying it.

#26 jon

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Posted 13 February 2015 - 12:46 PM

I keep threatening to lock the doors and never come back - usually immediately after a series of soul-crushing projects with clients who just refuse to realize we don't just 'push buttons' or pull this it out of our ass.

 

Someday I'll be opening a simple menu breakfast shop where the day starts at 4am and is wrapped by noon. Someday..



#27 oeuf

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Posted 13 February 2015 - 06:25 PM

I got so burned out I went into accounting. What was always draining for me was the need to be creative "on demand" for whatever job. Some people have an amazing ability to do that but I can't. I switched to a field where it's more about problem solving; where progress is more quantifiable, and I'm really enjoying it.

Hey Beaver! So that's what you've been doing. How long have you been in accounting?



#28 AromaKat

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Posted 13 February 2015 - 08:04 PM

 

 

Someday I'll be opening a simple menu breakfast shop where the day starts at 4am and is wrapped by noon. Someday..

 

Someday I'll be opening 7/11 franchises all over some small town thats booming.... Someday...


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#29 este.eri

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Posted 14 February 2015 - 05:19 PM

Hey Beaver! I hear you man. I thought about going back to school too. In the end it's what you say..."quantifiable progress" ...in this field once you know your way around stuff, progress often stops being about quality. It's about pleasing someone.



#30 silatix

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Posted 16 February 2015 - 05:49 PM

Aside from the occasional stress of having to be "on" when I'm not always feeling 100% creative or the rush to deadline, I feel damn lucky to be in this field. To each his own I guess.. I can't imagine doing anything else honestly. Maybe its the lack of being tied down and having always been freelance. The reality is the that I think the people in our field are some of the most awesome people out there to work with. Freelance benefits me the freedom to travel between projects, keep up with hobbies, and lead a fairly balanced life. Perhaps if I was working for a sweatshop house or a fulltimer somewhere I didn't like, my tune would be different. 


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#31 AromaKat

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Posted 16 February 2015 - 06:06 PM

Hey Beaver, have you given any thought to using your newfound accounting chops and experience in our industry together, as an EP of a shop? A good EP that is part accountant, part salesman, and has a good understanding of our world is a very, very difficult find. They tend to work Banker's hours and make a good percentage.

 

I got so burned out I went into accounting. What was always draining for me was the need to be creative "on demand" for whatever job. Some people have an amazing ability to do that but I can't. I switched to a field where it's more about problem solving; where progress is more quantifiable, and I'm really enjoying it.


"Early to bed, early to rise, work like hell, and advertise."
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#32 vozzz

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Posted 16 February 2015 - 09:53 PM

Hey Beaver, have you given any thought to using your newfound accounting chops and experience in our industry together, as an EP of a shop? A good EP that is part accountant, part salesman, and has a good understanding of our world is a very, very difficult find. They tend to work Banker's hours and make a good percentage.

 

 

I agree this is a great idea. mograph community needs accountants.


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#33 laughingcolors1

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Posted 28 July 2015 - 02:56 PM

i've made a slight pivot, to more video editing. but then again, that's what i've always wanted to do, i just utilize my mograph experience to make me a better editor.

not that far off though. One thing that gets to me is the lack of daily stability.  Even working for large companies this day and age, there's no stability....



#34 laughingcolors1

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Posted 28 July 2015 - 02:58 PM

and I've really wanted to do more producing work, but, i've found nobody wants to train designers/editors to do producing work...even though the best design producers i've worked with have been former creatives.



#35 oeuf

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Posted 28 July 2015 - 03:07 PM

One thing that gets to me is the lack of daily stability.  Even working for large companies this day and age, there's no stability....

 

I cannot agree more.



#36 Basic

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Posted 04 August 2015 - 06:17 AM

Freelance was great for me. Well paid but stressful and I'd get burnt out quick. Now though I have a full time gig producing video's for an educational company. Job is awesome and I leave at 5 on the dot every night. Restored that work life balance I had wanted for so long. regular pay and now free evenings...

 

Funny thing is I realised I actually didn't have any hobbies when I left freelance as all my time was consumed by that. I don't feel I'm at that stage where I want to transition to something else but it will one day.



#37 justinfromohio

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Posted 08 July 2017 - 07:23 PM

Holy crap!  Thanks everyone for the responses to this,  even though this thread is pretty old. I just wanted to say thanks to everyone for their input. Hopefully, this can help some people out at some point in their careers that might have the same thought process. I guess I'll give an update. I tried the dev life and it was ok but once I got into the day to day, I really missed working in C4d and AE. I found out I liked designing and animation a little more than coding but I did learn Javascript which was actually a nice skill to pick up. So I'm doing more animation again and designing some user interfaces which is a nice change of pace. So being wiser, a little older and a few whiskeys deep.  I'm just seeing where this work will go. thanks again 


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