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Reel Critique


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#1 SethD

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 09:18 PM

So I recently finished up my first demo reel, and as much as I'm feeling the love from friends and family, I definitely want to hear what motion design professionals have to say about my work



I come from a web and print design background, and this is my first stab at applying what I know about design to designing motion graphics. I've been working on and off on these pieces since around the end of December. I've been messing around in After Effects for a couple months, and Cinema 4D for just under two years. That said, I can take any critique you want to throw at me.

I'll even get the ball rolling. I think my usage of the camera is really weak — I hardly move it at all throughout the reel, and it's something I'm going to focus on going forward.

Edited by SethD, 25 February 2011 - 09:18 PM.

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#2 daveglanz

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 10:14 PM

I think what you put in there is good. That being said, there's not much there :) The reel is short and there aren't any tutorials in it, and you seem to have a fairly decent design background. I say just keep going and play with the camera more, as you mentioned. Good luck!

#3 mintyfresh

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 11:31 PM

i noticed a lot of linear keyframes... that always sticks out to me and would probably make me not want to hire you

just my 2 inflated cents

#4 killkillakillyo

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 02:37 AM

binky had a long ass post somewhere about how we are primarily storytellers and filmmakers. as much as i don't like his preachiness, he's absolutely right.

so drop the c4d, drop the after effects, and pick up a book on the fundamentals like shot composition, storyboarding, kama sutra, and others. camera moves are what separates the men from the welkers.

#5 SethD

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 03:28 AM

Dave: Thanks! I take great pride in not including tutorials. I'm glad you liked what I have.

Mintyfresh: For my own reference, where is it really obvious that things are linear key frames? I didn't venture too far away from them in these pieces as you said, but I'd really like to know where I should've.

killkillakillyo: I'll be sure to look into the post. If you have any feedback that's less general I'd be interested in hearing it.

Thanks for the feedback, guys! I know I didn't have much here, but I'm making a habit of experimenting with this medium and was wanting to get some feedback sooner rather than later. I look forward to applying it all to my work moving forward.
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#6 killkillakillyo

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 04:21 AM

more specific? you have to work on your storytelling and your shot progression.


one thing most newbies have to learn is that this is not an easy game. on the contrary this is one of the more difficult professions out there.

simply being a master of the software will not win you any fans. in fact it will be the bane in your repertoire - instead of finding a creative solution, you will be more likely to take the long road, costing you, your colleagues, and your studio, precious time and money. which is where good design comes in. it can take the most mundane idea, and turn it into an orchestra of awesome with the least amount of effort.


with that in mind, look at each project as a miniature movie, whether it's 5 seconds or 2 minutes. right now your movies suck. and the reason they suck is because you fail to address the many design canons that no manual or blog will teach you. and that's only the first step.

get to the first checkpoint. there you'll find directions to the next. one step at a time, no shortcuts.

#7 killkillakillyo

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 04:27 AM

Mintyfresh: For my own reference, where is it really obvious that things are linear key frames? I didn't venture too far away from them in these pieces as you said, but I'd really like to know where I should've.


it's clear you don't know what a linear keyframe is. almost all of your keyframes appear linear. and the default curve does not cut it.

google is your friend.

#8 AromaKat

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 07:05 AM

I enjoyed your intro sequence. Just keep making little dailies like that to start filling up your reel.

"Early to bed, early to rise, work like hell, and advertise."
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#9 SethD

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 04:18 PM

more specific? you have to work on your storytelling and your shot progression.


one thing most newbies have to learn is that this is not an easy game. on the contrary this is one of the more difficult professions out there.

simply being a master of the software will not win you any fans. in fact it will be the bane in your repertoire - instead of finding a creative solution, you will be more likely to take the long road, costing you, your colleagues, and your studio, precious time and money. which is where good design comes in. it can take the most mundane idea, and turn it into an orchestra of awesome with the least amount of effort.


with that in mind, look at each project as a miniature movie, whether it's 5 seconds or 2 minutes. right now your movies suck. and the reason they suck is because you fail to address the many design canons that no manual or blog will teach you. and that's only the first step.

get to the first checkpoint. there you'll find directions to the next. one step at a time, no shortcuts.


So, any recommended reading, then?
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#10 killkillakillyo

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 05:03 PM

So, any recommended reading, then?


this is a good primer. you already have a background in print and graphic design, so most of this should be a refresh for you. if not, then you are long overdue.

clicky

amazon reviews should help you the rest of the way. and like i said, google is your friend.

#11 motionbit

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Posted 27 February 2011 - 06:04 PM

You should read The Animator Survival Kit from Richard Williams

Priceless if you are into motion...

#12 Artistic Synthesis

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 02:39 PM

camera moves are what separates the men from the welkers.


:lol: Those are some words to live by





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