Jump to content


Photo

MoGrafik Showreel 2011


  • Please log in to reply
38 replies to this topic

#1 Mografik

Mografik

    Newbie

  • Members
  • 15 posts

Posted 01 March 2011 - 04:45 PM

Hi everyone, I'm Thom, I'm new around these parts, after being recommended this forum by a friend.
I've just uploaded my new reel, it's up at:

www.mografik.com/reel

please take a look, any comments or suggestions welcome!
Glad to be here, looking forward to being part of the community at mograph!
www.mografik.com

#2 Artistic Synthesis

Artistic Synthesis

    MoGraph Regular

  • Members
  • 58 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida

Posted 01 March 2011 - 05:09 PM

You've got some good stuff in there, but you REALLY need to lose presets & tutorial pieces (GSG City Kit title & MILG 7 Dynamic Letters). Everyone in this community knows that stuff. Good for learning, not good for a reel.


#3 tezuka

tezuka

    MoGraph Superstar

  • Members
  • 146 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Berlin

Posted 01 March 2011 - 05:14 PM

You forgot the hydraulic arm ;-)

#4 Mografik

Mografik

    Newbie

  • Members
  • 15 posts

Posted 01 March 2011 - 05:40 PM

hey guys,
thanks for the comments, I know the tutorial stuff doesn't show the most wildly imaginative creativity in those instances, but I figured the tutorial stuff displays what I have learnt, and what I can now do through that learning. I know anyone here can spot it a mile off, but ultimately it still displays ideas for graphic treatments to the intended audience of clients / prospective clients. In all tutorial based stuff here, I've tried to take what I've learnt from a tutorial, and add some of my own style to it.
Thanks for your comments!
www.mografik.com

#5 Trione

Trione

    MoGraph Megastar

  • Members
  • 253 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Stamford,CT

Posted 01 March 2011 - 06:01 PM

hey guys,
thanks for the comments, I know the tutorial stuff doesn't show the most wildly imaginative creativity in those instances, but I figured the tutorial stuff displays what I have learnt, and what I can now do through that learning. I know anyone here can spot it a mile off, but ultimately it still displays ideas for graphic treatments to the intended audience of clients / prospective clients. In all tutorial based stuff here, I've tried to take what I've learnt from a tutorial, and add some of my own style to it.
Thanks for your comments!


I don't think the people responsible for hiring will agree with your logic.

#6 tezuka

tezuka

    MoGraph Superstar

  • Members
  • 146 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Berlin

Posted 01 March 2011 - 06:24 PM

Maybe some time in the future modesigners will be confronted with a project/problem,
where they only have to have a grasp of the techniques involved, write them into
a tutorialoogle and magically it will spit out the exact tutorials you need in the
right order you should work them trough, so basically brains&creativity do not matter anymore.
Maybe we are in the future.

#7 rollowenlock

rollowenlock

    MoGraph Superstar

  • Members
  • 102 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wellington, New Zealand
  • Interests:Ideas + execution

Posted 01 March 2011 - 08:29 PM

Hey man, there's some good looking stuff on your reel. I have a couple of comments that might help it get tighter and more too the point.

Keep it under a minute. If you use this rule, you'll see you only use the BEST bits of each project. Its funny how the people who have been around the longest have the shortest reels!

Only refer to a project ONCE (don't cut back to the same look over and over again, it screams out PADDING)

Keep the title (your name and what you do) REALLY short and not flashy, if its too over done, it makes one feel you've had too much time to do that, and not work on the jobs! Also, if you keep the naming REALLY simple, it make the work pop.

Aim for a nice variety of shot sizes (close to far) over and over, so you feel the film as a tapersty.

Cut the shots for shots sake, not with the music, so we can get a good feel for the shot. And you'll be surprised how many people watch a reel without the music on...

thats about it, hope it helps.

Rollo

#8 Mografik

Mografik

    Newbie

  • Members
  • 15 posts

Posted 01 March 2011 - 08:38 PM

it's a tough audience here I see.
Sadly, I have had a few jobs now, where an art director will stand over my shoulder and demand idiotic things like 'make it look more high res' and I'm simply the hired gun who has to try and take what they say and have it make some sense on the screen. Those jobs can really suck. Given how hard it is to get decent work in the industry it seems silly to not use some of the best looking works I have produced. You can see a reel from several perspectives ie, designer, art director, client, software aptitude etc. I won't for a moment pretend that any of the tutorial based works you see here are down to my creativity talents.
You'll notice I've also included works like the OK Magazine advert I previously produced. I acknowledge they're much weaker on both a design perspective and technical standpoint, however I chose to include those works since I understand that working with brands, and TV broadcast work hold a lot of clout from a client perspective, which is my main goal here.
What's more, for the intro of the reel that you see there, before I even knew city kit existed, I envisaged a shot where the initial logo is revealed, backs out of a billboard, then reveals a title over a city. I used city kit to do this, however, does doing so make me a poor art director? Does it make me a cop out 3d technician for using a plug in? I guess these are questions concerning what field people are looking to work in to.
No one ever had a go at Harry Potter for using an expelliarmus spell and said 'lame, Snape did that aaaaaages ago.' (haha... that's stupid, I know)
Apologies if I've offended anyone by using tutorial based work on my reel here. I guess you just gotta see it as a mark of respect for the authors of some great, inspiring tutorials that are out there.
www.mografik.com

#9 Mografik

Mografik

    Newbie

  • Members
  • 15 posts

Posted 01 March 2011 - 08:43 PM

Keep it under a minute. If you use this rule, you'll see you only use the BEST bits of each project. Its funny how the people who have been around the longest have the shortest reels!

Only refer to a project ONCE (don't cut back to the same look over and over again, it screams out PADDING)

Keep the title (your name and what you do) REALLY short and not flashy, if its too over done, it makes one feel you've had too much time to do that, and not work on the jobs! Also, if you keep the naming REALLY simple, it make the work pop.

Aim for a nice variety of shot sizes (close to far) over and over, so you feel the film as a tapersty.

Cut the shots for shots sake, not with the music, so we can get a good feel for the shot. And you'll be surprised how many people watch a reel without the music on...


That's great Rollo, very useful feedback, especially concerning the edit of the reel. I guess I wanted a flash title intro, since I remember a tutor telling me that as I designer, everything in my output must be designed. Thankfully I did have the luxury of time to put into the intro and outro, but yeah, I see your point!
Thanks very much
www.mografik.com

#10 Binky

Binky

    Wise Sage of mograph

  • Members
  • 872 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:LA

Posted 01 March 2011 - 09:07 PM

I know the tutorial stuff doesn't show the most wildly imaginative creativity in those instances, but I figured the tutorial stuff displays what I have learnt, and what I can now do through that learning. I know anyone here can spot it a mile off, but ultimately it still displays ideas for graphic treatments to the intended audience of clients / prospective clients.

Your reel is not a record of what happened when someone else came up with a way to do something, made detailed instructions on doing it, and then you followed those instructions. If it were, it'd be much easier and more honest for all of us to supply our clients with menus listing certain effects and the cost per hour to have us follow the instructions to achieve them. But that's not what a reel is.

And that's not where the value of design is for a client. The value for a client is in having something specific communicated about them or their product/service/brand. They need to stand out, and people need to understand what their value is relative to other products/services/brands. The client needs people to understand them in a certain light, as having certain ideals, or benefits, or cultural cache, or whatever. There are millions of things the client might need communicated, but that they are generic, interchangeable with other brands, or are otherwise of equal value to any other is in almost every case NOT an idea they want to communicate. In other words, if Client A wants all the boys, she doesn't want to buy the same dress that Client B and C are both probably going to buy because all 3 will look exactly the same when they leave the store and no one will be able to tell which one is hotter. If she has the cash, she wants to go to a "designer" to get a custom design and fitting that suits her perfectly. You're not the Gap, you're a designer.

You're not McDonald's, you're a personal chef. Your clients are not paying you to sit at a cash register and charge them for reaching behind you and grabbing a #7 for them, even if you're giving them blue ketchup instead of red. They're paying you to listen to their hunger. Their need. They're paying you to spend the time to think about crafting a meal for them that caters to their tastes and nutritional requirements, that makes them feel cared for and special.

Don't be a drone or a robot. Don't treat this like a McJob. Be a personal chef. Be a landscaper, custom tailor, architect. Be a designer, for fuck's sake.

#11 beau+++

beau+++

    Mograph Deity

  • Members
  • 1,368 posts

Posted 01 March 2011 - 09:19 PM

it's a tough audience here I see.


We ARE a tough audience around here, but not nearly as tough as a prospective employer/client will be. The best career move I ever made was to come on mograph.net 6 years ago and politely ask everyone to rip my work to shreds. Take the snark with a grain of salt, but seriously take our advice.

Sadly, I have had a few jobs now, where an art director will stand over my shoulder and demand idiotic things like 'make it look more high res' and I'm simply the hired gun who has to try and take what they say and have it make some sense on the screen. Those jobs can really suck. Given how hard it is to get decent work in the industry it seems silly to not use some of the best looking works I have produced. You can see a reel from several perspectives ie, designer, art director, client, software aptitude etc.


If the jobs you're getting "really suck", you need to ask yourself why you're getting those jobs. I'd be willing to bet it's because you consider yourself "simply the hired gun", and in return others perceive you as exactly that.

I won't for a moment pretend that any of the tutorial based works you see here are down to my creativity talents.


Then what the hell are they doing in your reel?

You'll notice I've also included works like the OK Magazine advert I previously produced. I acknowledge they're much weaker on both a design perspective and technical standpoint, however I chose to include those works since I understand that working with brands, and TV broadcast work hold a lot of clout from a client perspective, which is my main goal here.
What's more, for the intro of the reel that you see there, before I even knew city kit existed, I envisaged a shot where the initial logo is revealed, backs out of a billboard, then reveals a title over a city. I used city kit to do this, however, does doing so make me a poor art director? Does it make me a cop out 3d technician for using a plug in? I guess these are questions concerning what field people are looking to work in to.
No one ever had a go at Harry Potter for using an expelliarmus spell and said 'lame, Snape did that aaaaaages ago.' (haha... that's stupid, I know)
Apologies if I've offended anyone by using tutorial based work on my reel here. I guess you just gotta see it as a mark of respect for the authors of some great, inspiring tutorials that are out there.


Close your browser for a bit and go make your own shots to replace the tutorial pieces. You'll spend twice as long defending them over the course of your career as you would just replacing them. It's not just that they don't help you, it's that they actively hurt you.
"Don't be a drone or a robot. Don't treat this like a McJob. Be a personal chef. Be a landscaper, custom tailor, architect. Be a designer, for fuck's sake." - Binky

#12 beau+++

beau+++

    Mograph Deity

  • Members
  • 1,368 posts

Posted 01 March 2011 - 09:23 PM

Don't be a drone or a robot. Don't treat this like a McJob. Be a personal chef. Be a landscaper, custom tailor, architect. Be a designer, for fuck's sake.


Bravo, Binky. New sig.
"Don't be a drone or a robot. Don't treat this like a McJob. Be a personal chef. Be a landscaper, custom tailor, architect. Be a designer, for fuck's sake." - Binky

#13 NastyJames

NastyJames

    MoGraph Superstar

  • Members
  • 162 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NYC

Posted 01 March 2011 - 09:32 PM

it's a tough audience here I see.
Sadly, I have had a few jobs now, where an art director will stand over my shoulder and demand idiotic things like 'make it look more high res' and I'm simply the hired gun who has to try and take what they say and have it make some sense on the screen. Those jobs can really suck. Given how hard it is to get decent work in the industry it seems silly to not use some of the best looking works I have produced. You can see a reel from several perspectives ie, designer, art director, client, software aptitude etc. I won't for a moment pretend that any of the tutorial based works you see here are down to my creativity talents.
You'll notice I've also included works like the OK Magazine advert I previously produced. I acknowledge they're much weaker on both a design perspective and technical standpoint, however I chose to include those works since I understand that working with brands, and TV broadcast work hold a lot of clout from a client perspective, which is my main goal here.
What's more, for the intro of the reel that you see there, before I even knew city kit existed, I envisaged a shot where the initial logo is revealed, backs out of a billboard, then reveals a title over a city. I used city kit to do this, however, does doing so make me a poor art director? Does it make me a cop out 3d technician for using a plug in? I guess these are questions concerning what field people are looking to work in to.
No one ever had a go at Harry Potter for using an expelliarmus spell and said 'lame, Snape did that aaaaaages ago.' (haha... that's stupid, I know)
Apologies if I've offended anyone by using tutorial based work on my reel here. I guess you just gotta see it as a mark of respect for the authors of some great, inspiring tutorials that are out there.


That's bullshit. When you put tutorial based work in your reel, it isn't "a mark of respect" for tutorial authors, it's straight up plagiarism. Any monkey (not you monkey) with a computer, can watch a tutorial, copy it and put it in a reel. But thats not your work. I could copy the Mona Lisa stroke for stroke, but that doesn't make me a great painter. I could play stairway on a guitar, but that doesn't make me a great musician. You try and pass off work thats not yours and it makes you a hack, and cheapens our profession. I just finished a reel, it was a lot of work, and it's not without its faults, but I'm proud of it because every drop of work in there is mine. Did I learn things from watching tutorials? Fuck yes. Hell I'm entirely self-taught by way of tutorials. You think I don't have better, sleeker tutorial pieces, that I kept out of my reel? Fuck yes I do. And it sucks because I know how great they look, but that work isn't mine to show. And the worst part of it all, is that the work you did that wasn't based on tutorials, is pretty good. And by putting in all that tutorial BS, you've cheapened any of the good work you actually did.

#14 killkillakillyo

killkillakillyo

    MoGraph Megastar

  • Members
  • 247 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York

Posted 01 March 2011 - 09:49 PM

don't worry everyone. killkillakillyo is here...

it's a tough audience here I see.
Sadly, I have had a few jobs now, where an art director will stand over my shoulder and demand idiotic things like 'make it look more high res' and I'm simply the hired gun who has to try and take what they say and have it make some sense on the screen. Those jobs can really suck. Given how hard it is to get decent work in the industry it seems silly to not use some of the best looking works I have produced. You can see a reel from several perspectives ie, designer, art director, client, software aptitude etc. I won't for a moment pretend that any of the tutorial based works you see here are down to my creativity talents.
You'll notice I've also included works like the OK Magazine advert I previously produced. I acknowledge they're much weaker on both a design perspective and technical standpoint, however I chose to include those works since I understand that working with brands, and TV broadcast work hold a lot of clout from a client perspective, which is my main goal here.
What's more, for the intro of the reel that you see there, before I even knew city kit existed, I envisaged a shot where the initial logo is revealed, backs out of a billboard, then reveals a title over a city. I used city kit to do this, however, does doing so make me a poor art director? Does it make me a cop out 3d technician for using a plug in? I guess these are questions concerning what field people are looking to work in to.
No one ever had a go at Harry Potter for using an expelliarmus spell and said 'lame, Snape did that aaaaaages ago.' (haha... that's stupid, I know)
Apologies if I've offended anyone by using tutorial based work on my reel here. I guess you just gotta see it as a mark of respect for the authors of some great, inspiring tutorials that are out there.


ok thom, not a good start for you especially considering you've just burned your name on a site visited but many a seasoned designer. hi thom...bye thom.

an art director's job IS to stand over your shoulder and babysit you. especially if you happen to be the guy who has a reel full of tutorials. if you can't deal with that then good luck on your own.

and nate is on the money. you are a straight up biter thom, taking credit for work not your own. "oh but i had that idea in my head, nick and chris just happened to do all the legwork. still my property." wrong. you have shown that you have absolutely no artistic integrity, have a very fickle definition of responsibility, and are a plain old ass. great traits when looking for work in an ultra-competitive industry.

but don't fret, we all see it and so will your would-be employers. bye thom.

#15 Mografik

Mografik

    Newbie

  • Members
  • 15 posts

Posted 01 March 2011 - 11:15 PM

Don't be a drone or a robot. Don't treat this like a McJob. Be a personal chef. Be a landscaper, custom tailor, architect. Be a designer, for fuck's sake.


Binky, I like what you've got to say. Your words remind me of those of some of the best tutors I've ever had. Thank you. It could be that this kind of inspiration is just the reason a forum like this one could be useful.
Ok, so the unfortunate truth for me is that I am sometimes a bit of a hired gun with software skills sometimes, and I don't always get the creative licence. (I've been working full time as a video editor / motion graphic artist nearly 2 years since graduating). And the likelihood is my next job may be similar (although hopefully better) one. I'm not sure if I'm ready to venture into freelancing as my livelihood just yet, and the necessity to stay alive means that I currently gotta play with the cards I'm dealt. I continually aspire to better myself as a designer, and to work in a more creative environment. With both the jobs I have, and have had in the past, I've been able to learn more about both software skills and design.
Ok, so maybe the next 2 self appointed projects I work will aim to replace the 2 aforementioned shots, but if I were to model a city myself, thus throwing away the citykit one, would that really take my reel out of McDonalds and into, say, Pizza Express? Either way, I hear what you all have to say, however to say I've solely tainted the industry by posting this is maybe a bit much.

and to say I'm 'a plain old ass,' isn't the constructive criticism I thought might be found here. Instead that's a (slightly premature?) assessment of me, and not my reel or my work. (Or 2 shots on my reel for that matter)

Thank you though, there is a lot I will take on board there. Man, who'd a thought a couple of shots could cause such a stink!
www.mografik.com

#16 NastyJames

NastyJames

    MoGraph Superstar

  • Members
  • 162 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NYC

Posted 02 March 2011 - 12:09 AM

Man, who'd a thought a couple of shots could cause such a stink!


anybody who took a minute to read any of the reel critiques on the board that they were posting their reel to. duh.

#17 beau+++

beau+++

    Mograph Deity

  • Members
  • 1,368 posts

Posted 02 March 2011 - 02:00 AM

Ok, so maybe the next 2 self appointed projects I work will aim to replace the 2 aforementioned shots, but if I were to model a city myself, thus throwing away the citykit one, would that really take my reel out of McDonalds and into, say, Pizza Express?

You still aren't getting it. Using CityKit to generate a city is fine, that's what it's for. Using his exact shot in your reel, with his City Text preset tutorial is NOT fine. There are plenty more uses for his city kit than to just resolve to his exact same overhead shot of some text in a city. Be creative.
"Don't be a drone or a robot. Don't treat this like a McJob. Be a personal chef. Be a landscaper, custom tailor, architect. Be a designer, for fuck's sake." - Binky

#18 Binky

Binky

    Wise Sage of mograph

  • Members
  • 872 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:LA

Posted 02 March 2011 - 02:02 AM

You're doin ok. Treat this like a wake-up call. Like a challenge to rock harder and work smarter.
I think the collective stink is both for our sakes and for yours. None of us, including yourself, really wants this industry to be perceived as a collection of hot-swappable generic services. We don't want to devolve into vending machines. We're not here to sell imagery units in high volume. And it's already a constant struggle with many clients to remind them of the value we can give them if they let us. So reinforcing the idea that a designer/animator is someone who has gone through the motions of following along to a tutorial and pressing the buttons they were told to is an easy way to quickly erode the venue for work that is inspiring and culturally valuable. See how that works? Every time you call yourself a designer or art director, while simultaneously behaving like an automated button-puncher, you do a disservice to the rest of the industry. By giving yourself the distinction of designer or animator etc while performing the duties of a call center operator, you're slowly wearing down the perception of what the rest of us do.

Now, I know you've only got the few shots in there that are the trouble spots. But we're collectively jumping on it because you're defending it in a way that signals to us that you don't understand the problem. And it is a problem. No one particularly wants a world where there's an application into which you type the name of your client and then hit F5 for a "grunge" commercial or F6 for a "techno" commercial and voila. The audience wouldn't get anything out of it, you wouldn't get anything out of it, and the client wouldn't get anything out of it. It'd be an impersonal artless world where everything looked like a used car dealership or a mattress warehouse with optical flares and it would be suicidally depressing.

Business people just don't know the fucking difference until they see the bottom line, and generally aren't imaginative or brave enough to see the potential in advance. So we have to collectively create a perceived value for them to validate future decision-making processes. If there isn't a general understanding that Prologue is likely gonna give you a bigger return on your bigger investment than Joe Robot down the street can, then Prologue ain't gonna be around much longer. Then Joe Robot will be on top and everything will devolve into Idiocracy.

We're fighting the good fight. Join it.
Be the guy who gives of himself. Make stuff that'll have us crying or laughing or gaping in awe. Stuff that will push us all forward. Don't be another tool. There are plenty already.

#19 RVA8

RVA8

    MoGraph Demi-god

  • Members
  • 412 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NYC

Posted 02 March 2011 - 02:09 AM

The thing that bothers me isn't those bits in your reel (though they're pretty bad). It's that you keep complaining and blaming the job. The job is going to be as awful or as awesome as you make it. I spent a couple years as a "hired gun" where most of the creative work was already done, but there are ALWAYS ways to bring your own thing to a project and really get something out of it. You just have to make them happen. You can't sit idly by and wait for someone to drop amazing projects in your lap.

R

Edited by RVA8, 02 March 2011 - 02:12 AM.


#20 the_Monkey

the_Monkey

    simian

  • Members
  • 2,011 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Brooklyn, NY

Posted 02 March 2011 - 02:59 AM

Maybe we are in the future.

I was told there would be cake.

:(

-m




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users