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lanhan

Do you have a second job besides mograph?

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Not sure if it is just me or if some of you are having hard time getting work too? I am in LA area and had a couple freelance jobs for a while and then, like all in a sudden, I have been looking for both freelance and staff position almost for more than 6 months now and still got nothing. So no right, isn't it? Well, I still sometimes get called up and have interviews here and there but eventually no one called back.... :lol: Anyways, since I need to help support my family so I am also working at a local store as a cashier and wonder if you have a second job that helps supporting you financially. Mine is not that an interesting job though.. ;)

Edited by lanhan

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Well, not everyone can be a superstar and command continuous work in motion graphics. It's a very narrow field, with comparatively few jobs which are all well competed for. Freelancing is hard - even if you have been doing your accounts and paying your debts off in time, it is a very straining way to live your life. If you have a family, I would take a job that allowed enough spare time to polish that reel AND spend time with them. Apply for the staff positions that your reel allows, and one day someone will give you a chance.

 

I'm freelance, I don't have a second or part-time job, and I suffer for this, but I wouldn't be able to work overtime so frequently if I had to leave work at half five to get to my evening job. It just wouldn't be possible and it wouldn't look very professional.

 

Just keep going, man. If you're as good as you think you can be, you're in no deep shit. Unlike me. Now, where's my green card?

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Guest Sao_Bento

Lanhan - I have no idea if you've already done this or not, but analyzing your experiences in mograph might give you a hint as to why you're having trouble finding work in one of the most "target rich" cities in the US for mograph work.

 

At what level were the clients you worked for?

Do you feel like they were 100% cool with the work you did?

Was everything delivered to the correct technical specs within the deadline?

Were there any communications problems?

Did you follow up with them after the project to see if there were any areas that could be improved? (meaning in communications, etc.- not the piece itself)

 

I'm not meaning to imply that you didn't do a great job, just that some introspection may be in order to give a little insight into your predicament. Mograph is actually a complex business that requires things way beyond being able to set a couple of keyframes. Personally, I want to work with talented people, but things like dependability and interpersonal skills aren't always traits of the folks who do the best work. For me, those things are a deal-breaker. If I think someone can't get something done without handholding, is likely to not mention that they aren't making progress or don't understand the goals, or is unwilling to work with the client rather than being an "artist", or goes into "blame everyone else" mode when they make a mistake, I'm avoiding them like the plague. On the other hand, I'm pretty mediocre as motion graphics/graphic designers go, but I've never had problems finding work (16 yrs). As a youngster, I worked at a video store while I did 2 yrs worth of television production internships. I felt like the guy who got me into the internship program was taking a chance by letting me in, so I made it my business to make sure that he never regretted it.

 

A quick example of the interpersonal communications faux pas - A company I worked at was hiring a jr. level designer, and I interviewed someone who had been recommended by a friend. From the minute he hit the door, he was constantly asking about money. How much did it pay, when would it pay more than that, when did I think he could move up the ladder, etc. (this is all at the first interview) He would have been a decent fit for the job and he probably would have had it if he had any manners, common sense, or ability to read the situation. Instead, what he did was create a negative association with his name. I don't think anyone who interviewed him came away with anything other than a bad impression, but he probably doesn't know that.

 

I'm also bringing this up because, in another thread, I advised people not to be shy about talking money at an interview without giving it proper context. If you and the potential employer already agree about the value you would bring to their company, go for it (basically, if you don't really care if you get the job). If you still need to convince the potential employer that you bring any value at all, it may not be such a good idea, although I still think it's OK to pre-qualify them by asking what the general range is.

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I own a few websites that are making me cash on the side, not really a second "job" though since I am mographin' it up fulltime.

 

It's a little hard to give you advice in your situation since we don't know your work at all. I'd venture a guess that if you're making it to the interview stage they've already seen your work, perhaps (and this is total speculation) you're leaving a little to be desired in the interview??

 

I don't live in LA, but I do seem to get a fair amount of remote work/offers from a few of the bigger studios out there. I'm in no way a rockstar designer, but I do make it a point to be humble and friendly and try to joke around with them if the situation calls for it. Being personable goes a long way, and transcends any minor design deficiencies with most employers. If I'm working on-site in a smaller shop, I'm the guy bringing donuts in for everyone in the morning and asking if they want to grab a beer after work. Little things like that are what make people (at smaller shops anyway) miss you when you're gone, and they're far more likely to have you back if they can call you a friend.

 

Advice like Sao's is invaluable. Read it then read it again. You've come to the right place.

Edited by beau+++

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I second Sao and Beau. Especially being dependable is really important.

Going well prepared to a interview( thanks gov ) might also give you a edge.

 

To point out something else ( and not saying that you aren't good ) - skills are very important. If you have a chance to learn and improve - do it. If you have some specialised knowledge which will set you apart from the rest ( Software, Experience, Talents ), promote it wisely and look for studios who might need your skills.

The better you are, the more likely it is to get a good job.

 

Also networking is very important.

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Thanks to you all!

 

Hehe, I didn't expect to get that much invaluable information out of this lounging post. Since I know how good/bad I am on mograph so I was not victimizing myself and started this thread for complaining or whining. I was just curious about what you guys do besides mograph for living. Though if this discussion can ever be helpful to anybody, that would be cool, too!

 

Although I am fortunate to be in one of the most "target rich" cities, I am not the only one who is after mograph anyways so I am fine with it. Plus the econ is down and it does affect the market I guess. I remember last time, an interviewer told me that they tend to hire less and less people nowadays.... Is this what you see in studios, too?

 

As far as I can tell myself, I got at least got 80% checked on the "check list." The 20% I can't meet is to share donuts with people.... I love donuts, GLAZED, darn it! :lol: I basically applying for anything I know I can do including non-pay office assistant. During interviews, I basically don't even talk about money because I see works and a chance to work with great artists more valuable than anything. I know people do like works I do (if not just being nice, hehe) and have me bookmarked. So I just tell myself that it is just not my time yet.

 

Again, thanks for sharing all your experience and information. But seriously, any interesting second job? :blush:

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Try using the showcase section.. Show us your work and if there are any issues in there.. You'll get some good critiques. Its another invaluable aspect to this forum.

 

Thanks to you all!

 

Hehe, I didn't expect to get that much invaluable information out of this lounging post. Since I know how good/bad I am on mograph so I was not victimizing myself and started this thread for complaining or whining. I was just curious about what you guys do besides mograph for living. Though if this discussion can ever be helpful to anybody, that would be cool, too!

 

Although I am fortunate to be in one of the most "target rich" cities, I am not the only one who is after mograph anyways so I am fine with it. Plus the econ is down and it does affect the market I guess. I remember last time, an interviewer told me that they tend to hire less and less people nowadays.... Is this what you see in studios, too?

 

As far as I can tell myself, I got at least got 80% checked on the "check list." The 20% I can't meet is to share donuts with people.... I love donuts, GLAZED, darn it! :lol: I basically applying for anything I know I can do including non-pay office assistant. During interviews, I basically don't even talk about money because I see works and a chance to work with great artists more valuable than anything. I know people do like works I do (if not just being nice, hehe) and have me bookmarked. So I just tell myself that it is just not my time yet.

 

Again, thanks for sharing all your experience and information. But seriously, any interesting second job? :blush:

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Thanks for the suggestion, silatix. I am working on some more projects and hope to put together a new reel soon.

 

Cleaning bongs, eh? ....it would be much enjoyable if it's a job. ^_^ Too bad, I have no time and money for even enjoy that now.

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That time between jobs is valuable- use it to cut your reel, build your website, and promote your work. You should also be sure to have a day rate that will support you even if you aren't constantly booked. That might mean cutting back on unnecessary expenses, and adjusting your lifestyle to deal with the variable income.

 

If you still need a little extra income, find something remotely related to creating a moving image. I was a PA on a film set when I first started freelancing. I made a little bit of cash, and got lots of exercise and lots of opportunity to network and see how a team works together on set.

 

I know a few people who worked at a museum, or an art gallery. All decent second jobs.

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I hate being the black sheep of this conversation, (or even advertising this for that matter), but I had to trudge through the first couple of years making most of my living money in the adult industry. Its an extremely constant source of work, and there is a LOT of room for just practicing new techniques. Maybe outside of L.A. this may not be as accessible - and I will advise you to stay away from all web-based companies / entities.

 

If you are in Los Angeles, are just starting out, would like a decent and fair paycheck, can stomach the content, and looking for a great place to start out, let me know so I can point you to the right companies.

 

It has always seemed that I am completely out of the normal loop around here, and have never really done the day rate thing for small boutique studios. I have an outrageous student loan that never allowed me to take these underpaid / internship / apprenticeship gigs.

 

Take my advice with a grain of salt and just consider it as another option. IMO, it is a great way (depending on who exactly your clients are) to get some practical training and get to know the programs like the back of your hand while making a livable income. But beware, there is a TON of skepticism out there and people tend to flip out when they see a penthouse logo. If you go this route, avoid placing anything more than a logo animation on your reel from the industry.

Edited by AromaKat

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Thanks, raven52321 and AromaKat! Really great experience and information you guys are sharing. I have an outrageous student loan myself, too, so I had to give up all that runner jobs too. All art related jobs are just cool! And I really wish that I could at least work as a janitor around great artists. :lol:

 

Anyway, at the moment, I am using the time to learn more stuff and going to package myself better for my next attempt. Networking.... It just has always been my weakest point, which I don't know what to do about it, haha. And gee, what's wrong with a penthouse logo. I like them.... :blush: Oh ya, I heard editors got into similar problems too. Really what's wrong?

 

And thanks Sao for chipping back in for my "real question, " hehe. I just happened to be hired as a graphic designer for a small firm today. Not mograph but at least I can "touch" both design and 3D. Hope it's a good start.

 

So...... I am having 3 jobs now. :blink:

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Learn to invest and/or do a little bit of daytrading.

It is obviously not as creative as some other stuff, but if you learn it, it can pay the bills and then some.

 

We are in an industry where we are constantly tethered to computers, usually w/online access. (It is often taken for granted. Not everyone has this opportunity)

There is no shortage of investing websites, or stock tracking widgets/gadgets/doodads.

I think the thing I like best about OSX is that I can compulsively check my stocks by simply hitting the F11 key! (This is both blessing and a curse) <_<

 

How many times are you freelancing in a room with a bunch of designers and almost everyone has headphones on?

I do the same except that I take a break from the IDM/down-tempo/triphop and listen to CNBC a few times a day.

 

It is good stuff to know, especially in our field where many people are freelancing and pensions and 401Ks are mythological stories told to us by our parents and are non-existent often even for full-timers.

Edited by BillD²²²

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Well...I have a second job beside Motion Design....Video Editing, rsrss!!!

 

So, man, It's a more difficult question if you have a family to supports....

 

Well.. I suppose that all mograph here above 30, 40 years old used to have another jobs in the Eighteens...

 

I read about this thread in another mograph sites , Jonh Dicknson www.motionworks.com.au

 

His is a sucess mograph that started as a HairDresser and MacDonalds cashier, and talked about it in a topic....take a look

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Guest Sao_Bento
Well...I have a second job beside Motion Design....Video Editing, rsrss!!!

 

So, man, It's a more difficult question if you have a family to supports....

 

Well.. I suppose that all mograph here above 30, 40 years old used to have another jobs in the Eighteens...

 

I read about this thread in another mograph sites , Jonh Dicknson www.motionworks.com.au

 

His is a sucess mograph that started as a HairDresser and MacDonalds cashier, and talked about it in a topic....take a look

I've had plenty of crappy jobs, (crafts store, cook at a bowling alley, cashier at Venture, UPS, etc.) but the mograph took hold when I was 22.

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I've had plenty of crappy jobs, (crafts store, cook at a bowling alley, cashier at Venture, UPS, etc.) but the mograph took hold when I was 22.

 

(quick off topic)

 

Hey Sao Bento...I looked your avatar and I'm curious about it....are you brasilian???

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Guest Sao_Bento
(quick off topic)

 

Hey Sao Bento...I looked your avatar and I'm curious about it....are you brasilian???

The avatar is a Jamie Hector as "Marlo" on HBO's series "The Wire"

http://www.hbo.com/thewire/cast/characters...stanfield.shtml

 

The name "Sao Bento" is taken from my past as a capoeirista - "Sao Bento Grande" being Mestre Bimba's berimbau rhythm for the regional style roda. I'm not Brasillian though - there are plenty of real ones around here though if you want to get your ‘fala portuguese’ on.

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The avatar is a Jamie Hector as "Marlo" on HBO's series "The Wire"

http://www.hbo.com/thewire/cast/characters...stanfield.shtml

 

The name "Sao Bento" is taken from my past as a capoeirista - "Sao Bento Grande" being Mestre Bimba's berimbau rhythm for the regional style roda. I'm not Brasillian though - there are plenty of real ones around here though if you want to get your ‘fala portuguese’ on.

 

Ah, the show from my hometown. It's the real deal. Just stick with it Lanhan. You'll get there and you too can become a bitter mographer:)

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Learn to invest and/or do a little bit of daytrading.

 

I second that. Its an easy extra $200 (at least) a day if you play your cards right. If you cant at work, the Chinese market is great for night hours - plus its a lot stronger and more predictable than the US market right now.

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With the automotive industry in a tailspin and the Detroit Mayor now in jail, it goes without saying that times are tough in my hometown of Motown.

 

I would be absolutely FFFFF*****DDDDD without income from the training products that I've done. Although, I've done a pretty good job totally screwing up my web site, I'll be relaunching it to really push more of this stuff, and also give more back to the community.

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Guest Sao_Bento
With the automotive industry in a tailspin and the Detroit Mayor now in jail, it goes without saying that times are tough in my hometown of Motown.

 

I would be absolutely FFFFF*****DDDDD without income from the training products that I've done. Although, I've done a pretty good job totally screwing up my web site, I'll be relaunching it to really push more of this stuff, and also give more back to the community.

Taking the global economy and the strength of the Euro into consideration, I really think you should consider spelling it "greymachine". The best defence is a good offence.

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You're not swimming in remote work?

 

With the automotive industry in a tailspin and the Detroit Mayor now in jail, it goes without saying that times are tough in my hometown of Motown.

 

I would be absolutely FFFFF*****DDDDD without income from the training products that I've done. Although, I've done a pretty good job totally screwing up my web site, I'll be relaunching it to really push more of this stuff, and also give more back to the community.

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