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tvp

Remember that list every one was talking about...

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Well here it is:

 

http://www.freelancersunion.org/advocacy/disqus.html

 

I found it via Motionographer on the Quickies list.

 

So have at it, list them all: the ones that don't pay, the ones that pay late and the ones that don't pay OT and intentionally misclassify you to the IRS and the State too. You may as well list the ones that coerce you to sign up with Employer of Record Services as well, since the whole purpose of that is to get out of paying over time, employer taxes and payroll costs.

 

Names that pop up right off the bat:

 

Ember Design, which by the way is apparently now Solid LA - for paying late

 

Eyeball NYC - for not paying at all

 

Semerad - for not paying at all

 

Demiurge, a Culver City, CA based visual effects shop - for not paying at all

 

Viva Design Inc. - for not paying at all and then only paying a portion of the amount due after deciding they (she) didn't "like" the work. -Convenient, I might add.

 

Big Star NYC - for paying late and only paying after numerous attempts to collect after a period of six months.

 

Edgworx - for not paying

 

Mac Guff, Los Angeles - for not paying

 

Janet Arlotta, Producer, Los Angeles, formerly Producer / Principal of Fuel (Los Angeles) and currently working at Jameson Media Group - for not paying

 

Full Mental Jacket (Ron Lasry) - for not paying

 

My Eskimo Friend / Reo Kobayashi, Principal, Los Angeles & Tokyo - for not paying

 

Redzone Entertainment - for not paying

 

Albert Xavier the New York based filmmaker; www.albertxavier.com and Belier Entertainment Pictures - for not paying

 

Zealot Films New York - for not paying or has yet to pay after 60 days.

 

Pure NYC - for paying late and not paying at all

 

Blue aka www.bluedesign.tv aka Howard McCabe, Philadelphia - for not paying

 

ABS-CBN Global, a network - for not paying

 

Blockade (they work with Rhythm and Hues). The owner's name is Brad Foxhoven, Los Angeles. - for not paying

*Rhythm and Hues was sued for non payment on a joint venture with Blockade and paid their share only after the freelancer won a judgement. Blockade aka Brad Foxhoven skipped town or is now doing business under another name. He may also be doing business with other companies to hide himself.*

 

Dogmatic aka Stellarhead aka Michael Santorelli and Laurel Harris - for not paying

 

Susan Reese, a storyboard artist rep at 411 Creatives - for not paying

 

Edited by tvp

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Nice.

 

I wish it were structured a bit differently though - listed by company name. The company name would have a number beside it - indicating the number of complaints, and if the user clicked on the company name, a list would appear below of all the comments...

 

I'm rambling...

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Nice.

 

I wish it were structured a bit differently though - listed by company name. The company name would have a number beside it - indicating the number of complaints, and if the user clicked on the company name, a list would appear below of all the comments...

 

I'm rambling...

 

You can always suggest these things to them:

 

http://www.freelancersunion.org/about/contact.html

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I think the list is a useful resource and maybe will put some pressure on houses to pay on time. But I would just caution that people should take it with a grain of salt. I've know plenty of people who worked at Eyeball for instance and enjoyed it, were paid on time and kept going back there. Seems to me that they've run into some cash-flow difficulties and are not paying as a result. Good for freelancers to have the info and put pressure on delinquent studios. But even on that list there is a pretty wide range of shops from those that are fly-by-night, two-bit operations that I wouldn't touch with a ten-foot pole to others that are pretty established firms that seem to be struggling through the weak economy last year.

 

I also agree it would be more helpful to see the number of complaints and ordered by company. People should suggest that.

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Obviously everyone should use their own judgment when deciding whether or not to work at a shop. But there is no excuse to not pay freelancers on time, established or not. It's dirty dealing, and if you are guilty of that, as Eyeball clearly is, then you need to have your name rubbed in the dirt a little. Word carries fast, and services like this are generally beneficial in helping those that don't have an ear tuned into what freelancers in a given community are talking about.

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It would also be helpful if it was organized by location and industry. I noticed a couple of proofreading freelancers.

Edited by Trione

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How did she respond to your work? I was actually impressed by how quickly she paid..

 

I didn't work for her. I was commenting on the post that some guy who did work for her wrote. She didn't pay him and when he called her up about it, her excuse was that she didn't "like" the work. He uses the term "they" in the post, but one can be sure that Ulricke is the culprit, it's her shop and she signs the checks going out of her account.

 

Here's the post he wrote on Freelancer's Union:

 

Viva Design from Santa Barbara, CA, (vivadesign.com) chose to pay me half my day rate (which had been specified and agreed upon by signed agreement) because they decided they didn't like what i did after i delivered my work. they owe me $300.

 

Ember Studio from Venice, CA (studioember.com), didn't intend to pay me for two days of work ($1,200) until after about ten emails and about as many phone calls, i sent them a final demand for payment threatening to sue, which is the first step small claims court requires plaintiffs to do to begin the lawsuit process. even though they were about 2 months or more late, and the signed contract specified a 2% late fee for late payment after 30 days, they only sent me $1,200 after all that.

Edited by tvp

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Well here it is:

 

http://www.freelancersunion.org/advocacy/disqus.html

 

I found it via Motionographer on the Quickies list.

 

So have at it, list them all: the ones that don't pay, the ones that pay late and the ones that don't pay OT and intentionally misclassify you to the IRS and the State too. You may as well list the ones that coerce you to sign up with Employer of Record Services as well, since the whole purpose of that is to get out of paying over time, employer taxes and payroll costs.

 

Names that pop up right off the bat:

 

I have gone through the Freelancers Union post and added more names that are specific to our industry, to my initial posting here.

Edited by tvp

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k

 

I didn't work for her. I was commenting on the post that some guy who did work for her wrote. She didn't pay him and when he called her up about it, her excuse was that she didn't "like" the work. He uses the term "they" in the post, but one can be sure that Ulricke is the culprit, it's her shop and she signs the checks going out of her account.

 

Here's the post he wrote on Freelancer's Union:

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As much as I love the theory of this list, it is scaring the ever loving shit out of me.

 

I think it could be toxic to our industry, prone to defamation lawsuits, and has the possibility to become really childish.

 

This could become Yelp seriously fast. *Everyone* in the industry needs to behave like professionals.

 

 

c

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Agreed.. This can hurt the industry on both sides. A lot of freelancing is based on trust.. Not contracts. The trust part is now being broken by some studios in terms of paying freelancers but now the studios may become wary of the freelancers they're hiring because they don't know whether this kid is going to start ripping on them all over the internet if they've had a bad experience.

 

The list isn't a bad idea.. but it's not a solution to our industrys problems imo.

 

As much as I love the theory of this list, it is scaring the ever loving shit out of me.

 

I think it could be toxic to our industry, prone to defamation lawsuits, and has the possibility to become really childish.

 

This could become Yelp seriously fast. *Everyone* in the industry needs to behave like professionals.

 

 

c

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If someone hasn't paid within 6 months, which already is too long, and/or offers only 75 percent of what they owe, they damn well deserve go be called out.

 

As much as I love the theory of this list, it is scaring the ever loving shit out of me.

 

I think it could be toxic to our industry, prone to defamation lawsuits, and has the possibility to become really childish.

 

This could become Yelp seriously fast. *Everyone* in the industry needs to behave like professionals.

 

 

c

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Yelp works by averages though. It's the wisdom of a crowd over the individual. While there are some pesky fools who have epicurean views on food, you learn to read more than one review to uncover the truth. And the truth will eventually out.

 

This isn't a perfect solution, obviously. A perfect solution would be if studios stopped screwing over their freelancers. That's not happening. Almost every freelancer I've ever met has been screwed in some way by a studio in his past. So this is a start.

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I also really liked this PDF I just found on the same site:

http://fu-res.org/0020091124/pdfs/advocacy/issue-briefs/tax-challenges.pdf

 

Interesting...I thought paying taxes was a good thing, to fund all those government programs? :)

 

One issue that PDF brings up is that independent contractors can't deduct the cost of their health insurance premiums. That is the kind of thing that would be fixed in REAL healthcare reform. Sadly, ideas like that never made it to the table through all that "bipartisanship."

 

Cf

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Yelp works by averages though. It's the wisdom of a crowd over the individual. While there are some pesky fools who have epicurean views on food, you learn to read more than one review to uncover the truth. And the truth will eventually out.

 

This isn't a perfect solution, obviously. A perfect solution would be if studios stopped screwing over their freelancers. That's not happening. Almost every freelancer I've ever met has been screwed in some way by a studio in his past. So this is a start.

 

Well said.

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Yelp works by averages though. It's the wisdom of a crowd over the individual. While there are some pesky fools who have epicurean views on food, you learn to read more than one review to uncover the truth. And the truth will eventually out.

 

This isn't a perfect solution, obviously. A perfect solution would be if studios stopped screwing over their freelancers. That's not happening. Almost every freelancer I've ever met has been screwed in some way by a studio in his past. So this is a start.

 

Yeah. I just want everyone to exercise caution before we get in a huge tit for tat internet bitch-fest, I guess. I'm also concerned for the talented employees and designers employed at the studios named, and want to be respectful of the jobs they are trying to do.

 

Also, I know there are some awesome studios we will never, ever, remotely see on this list because they just don't screw anyone over. And you are absolutely right, that's the way it should be.

 

c

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Interesting...I thought paying taxes was a good thing, to fund all those government programs? :)

 

One issue that PDF brings up is that independent contractors can't deduct the cost of their health insurance premiums. That is the kind of thing that would be fixed in REAL healthcare reform. Sadly, ideas like that never made it to the table through all that "bipartisanship."

 

Cf

 

Directly from the PDF you are referring to:

 

"Independent workers who are considered self-employed qualify to deduct the full cost of their health insurance plans on their federal income tax return."

To translate the rest, it's says that families like mine pay $11,000 for insurance, but that money is after taxes, not before taxes, like a 401k contribution is. Therefore, we are taxed on something that everyone is entitled to have: health care. Yeah, I know it sounds like pot smoking hippy talk.

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