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Video about storyboarding

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I thought this was fantastic. It's so helpful to hear some of the theory behind design choices and see your process. I feel I learnt a lot there and it was great that it wasn't just another tutorial to learn a specific effect, I could apply a lot of this to my everyday work.

 

Thanks!

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My thinking is that mograph is an audio/visual medium, and that initially I want to address the art and craft of it, which means these should be videos. It seems more valuable to provide lots of visual examples and to show things instead of trying to tell them. Design podcasts are typically about technology or industry news, career talk and stuff about the experience of the artist, and tutorials are usually specific tips and tricks, and all of that stuff is pretty well covered already. So I don't really know what to call these things I'm making... they're sort of primers at this point, and I don't have a solid model for how best to craft them, but I don't want them to become either tutorials or lectures. So if there's something specific that worked for you, or didn't, or that seemed particularly helpful or not helpful, I'm all ears. Literally, I'm made of ears. It's gross.

 

 

yes i agree i think these are fantastic!

 

I think you should keep making, hopefully with enough views you can do revenue sharing with youtube. And it'll be all worth your time.

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Sorry if this question comes across stupid, I'm still very new to Motion Graphics and am teaching myself. When I do my storyboards (for motion graphics) should I be doing them at the size the final video is going to be done in? For example, if a client asks for a 720p video, and I do my storyboards @ that size, all of my GFX will be at 720p — now what if the client returns later and says "Hey, I need a video done at 1080p" however the GFX I previously made were 720p...so is there a sort of standard size I should be doing my boards at?

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now what if the client returns later and says "Hey, I need a video done at 1080p" however the GFX I previously made were 720p

 

changeorderbetter.jpg

 

Jokes aside, yes, you would typically want to make the boards in the size that the content will be fully produced in so you can pipe much of the work done over easily. Don't produce work in 4k if its just going to end up as 720p unless they specifically ask for otherwise.

 

Render times, etc come into consideration when bidding the project, which is the boarding process is usually a part of. If they later want it recreated in a different spec, they will either have to settle with a conversion or just do it again. But the delivery spec should be defined by them and reiterated in your bid, statement of work, or whatever.

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I got a question for you guys who do a lot of boards.

 

Do you ever make traditional storyboards, like pencil sketches that show almost every step of the animation, with camera moves and detailed descriptions, so you'd have like 20-30 frames laying out the whole idea?

 

I always end up just sending about 6 or so frames (finished images) of the concept, like you've done here. But I've seen at Psyop they send just a couple of styleframes but also a whole traditional storyboard in pencil with detailed descriptions. Was curious how common that was.

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Do you ever make traditional storyboards, like pencil sketches that show almost every step of the animation, with camera moves and detailed descriptions, so you'd have like 20-30 frames laying out the whole idea?

Only for shootings or complex 3d stuff.

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Jokes aside, yes, you would typically want to make the boards in the size that the content will be fully produced in so you can pipe much of the work done over easily. Don't produce work in 4k if its just going to end up as 720p unless they specifically ask for otherwise.

Render times, etc come into consideration when bidding the project, which is the boarding process is usually a part of. If they later want it recreated in a different spec, they will either have to settle with a conversion or just do it again. But the delivery spec should be defined by them and reiterated in your bid, statement of work, or whatever.

 

 

A lot of times though we just work at 1080p and then down convert for delivery if it's let's say a 30 second spot and not a render hog. Partly it's for safety (often clients can be fuzzy on delivery specs early on) to have the extra resolution and partly just because we want to have a fully 1080P reel:) Of course if a project is render heavy and the client is only paying for 720, then we only work at 720. I really decide on a project by project basis what makes the most sense.
But I've seen at Psyop they send just a couple of styleframes but also a whole traditional storyboard in pencil with detailed descriptions. Was curious how common that was.

 

I wish we had the budget/time to do this more often. Nothing gets everyone on the same page both internally and on the client side like a full storyboard, if you have a larger team working on a project it becomes essential. But same as Levante we only actually end up doing this occasionally for bigger more complex projects. I always find my best work comes out of separating the process and doing style frames, then a full storyboard, and animatic. Need to force myself to try and follow this process more often.

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