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pamacado

Does anyone have experience with Vizrt?

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I'd like to explore real time motion graphics as a career option, but I have no idea if there's a big demand for those kind of roles in TV and how difficult is the learning curve of the software for that purpose.

 

Can anyone share his experience on this topic?

 

Cheers!

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In my experience there's not much "demand" per se. A highly qualified VizRT expert will be paid quite well, but contrary to your perception these are not necessarily motion graphics jobs. They have much more to do with system management, programming and production support e.g. for virtual studios, live broadcasts and so on. At least most people I know doing this stuff come from a different background than doing advertising porn. Creating the actual graphics is usually only a minor part, anyway - you develop the the design templates and then insert content into the placeholders either manually or based on dynamic data e.g. from databases. Unless these responsibilities are yours to share, you'll be much more busy with technical stuff like calibrating trackers in a 3D studio environment, programming cue sheets/ play lists and that sort of thing. but it depends. Since VizRT is not a single package, but a modular system made up of different parts, there is still a chance you could end up doing interesting stuff. You just should not expect it being anything like what you may do now. Anything to do withe broadcast can be repetitive - same shows, same graphics every week.

 

Mylenium

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Agreed. VizRT isn't well suited to producing motion graphics.

 

The output quality isn't remotely acceptable by motion graphic standards.The VIzRT is an OPENGL renderer. That's the same technology Cinema4D and After Effects use to render the previews in their viewports. HD output at a consistent frame rate over 30fps comes at the cost of quality no matter how many video cards are running under the hood.

 

If you need realtime rendered HD that can pull in data from a producers computer, website or database, then VizRT is the answer. If you need image quality, start running and never look back.

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A few years back I was working for a big agency that were re-branding an international news network. Their idea for the news main titles was to design something that could be output from VizRT such that every day, even every bulletin, was unique. Nice idea, don't think it ever got off the ground. But one thing is for sure - theVizRT guys weren't doing ANY design work, they were just advising on what was and wasn't possible.

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Usually, the viz RT "artist" is the guy in the broadcast room the producer is barking "GRAPHICS!" at, at which point he types in a name and hits enter. Doesn't seem fun at all. Sometimes, especially if working local news or something, they do some design work when not broadcasting but for the big glamourous stuff, the designs are usually provided from the outside.

 

From what I have seen, anyway.

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When I worked at WDIV-Detroit, we had one in for a day to try out. The experience made me want to punch a baby.

 

I could see if someone committed to learning this.. became technically proficient AND could design, that you could probably make a killing. Then again, there are a lot of terrible things we could do to make more money.

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Mylenium is spot on. Vizrt is pretty much a platform that runs almost every major TV network out there. ESPN, FOX, CBS, CNN, NFL Network, Univision, SKY, ect... Its basically, broadcast content management tool. By that I mean that it runs everything, from insert graphics, set content, monitor walls, virtual sets, tickers, wings, interstitials, wipes, bumps, closes, ect.

 

Its not really a motion graphics tool, at the core its and OpenGL render, so its similar to Unity, Unreal or Element 3D. Its a game engine that was specifically built for broadcast. The real power of Viz is that it lets you customize anything you want in the scene, you are literally playing out your project files on air, everything is customizable right up until it is played out. As a VizRT Artist you spend half your time designing, or taking a design done in C4D and re-creating it to run in real-time (60 FPS, I wish it were 30 :). There is lots of programing involved, once you have the look approved, you need to rig a scene so that you can swap out logos, text, 3d models, ect. The old method was to have a designer create a 3D project, and AE project and you would need to version hundreds of elements, you would literally have a team of people who were devoted to version every logo matchup. ect. Now with Viz you can just type in a team code and it swaps out all the materials, textures, ect. Kinda like xref, but better.

 

The downside is that its not a compositor. Just like a game engine you need to do all your compositing right there in the 3D scene. That is why lots of artist freak out when they first get their hand on it. The simply don't know what to do. Also when you have to stay about 60 fps there are compromises. Textures need to be baked, models need to be optimized, ect.

 

AaromaKat Your version of a VizRT Artist is actually called a Trio operator, basically they are just calling up graphic that a Viz Artist has made and filling them out, and yeah nobody wants to do that.

 

I work as a Viz Artist at a major network and I would say that they are in extremely high demand, mostly because its such a complex system and you are in charge of running the network day in and day out. Hope that clears up some misinformation.

 

 

If your interested in realtime 3D motion graphics try touch designer http://www.derivative.ca/ not really used in broadcast but for concerts and interactive things. Hope that helps.

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Only messed around with Viz and ORAD a little bit, bug worked fulltime with Brainstorm eStudio for a few years.

It is easily the most powerful graphics engine around (realtime that is), but it is NOT easy to do mograph type stuff.

It was mostly used for replacing CG systems (deko, etc) in order to do way more complicated stuff. It has a really powerful backend for importing data.

 

It is also huge in creative virtual sets/augmented reality type stuff. Viz and ORAD are big in the game as well, but a lot of virtual you see on major networks (NBC,CNBC, ESPN, etc) is Brainstorm.

I've used it for everything from video walls (256x1280 up to 3240x1080 and bigger) to virtual sets (ufc, espn sportscenter) and data representation (ball tracking for wimbledon BBC)

 

They actually just recently partnered with Avid to create the new Avid Motion Graphics system. It's basically an Avid-like frontend for eStudio, which allows more motion graphics oriented people to use it.

I wasn't a fan, but I learned on the original system and was pretty used to that.

 

As AromaKat said, most of the "artists" for these softwares are really just operators running other people's designs

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