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BOY:1:DER

Quick way to create chinese sun rays

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Since this style seems to pop up all the time, I thought I would share a way to build these SUPER fast.

 

1.) Open Illustrator

2.) Create a circle

3.) Apply a dotted line to the circle

4.) Set the stroke width to something really high, like 150 or 240

5.) Mess around with dotted line width, the gap in between the dotted lines, circle scale, etc.

6.) When you have it just right, go under the Object menu to Flatten Transparency

7.) Default settings are just fine, so just hit OK

8.) Ungroup the group and delete the empty circle that is still there

9.) Enjoy your rays!

 

Well, there you have it folks...it doesn't get much easier than that...unless someone has already created a chinese rays plugin...by trapcode.

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And if you're extra lazy, you can just use one of mine.

Now in three new flavours!

 

Get them here.

 

A quick glance:

CircleSlices4Web.gif

 

I forgot to mention.

It's an Illustrator 10 file (for max compatibility).

There are three groups for each design (One Outline, One Front and One Back).

To change the colors, simply pick the one that has the number of slices you want, select the StyleXFront, change it to the color you want. Select SyleXback and set it to the color you want.

The Outline version is there if you only need one color. You can set it over stuff. (if that makes any sense).

Edited by isotrope

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props iso!... i saved an AE project that i had made some animated rays.... guatolupe rays... if you want i'll send u em

I'm sorry, FlipSwitch, but I'm not sure I know what guatolupe rays are. I'm always interested in seeing stuff from others, though. Send them over :)

 

 

BOY:1:DER, I apologize. I think your method is really simple and effective. Didn't mean to hijack your tute. :unsure:

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i do something similar.

 

1. make a circle.

2. create a line through the middle that extends past the edges.

3. select the rotate tool and enter a value (do a little math to figure out how many degs to rotate)...hit COPY

4. hit cmd+d to repeat the rotate/copy command

5. select all and use the pathfinder to break it all up, and then ungroup.

 

if you want a pinwheel instead of rays, just add a twist effect to the first line, before rotating/copying.

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BOY:1:DER, I apologize. I think your method is really simple and effective. Didn't mean to hijack your tute. :unsure:

 

Dude, no problem...this site is all about sharing, and it's great you did!

 

krpdesign: the reason I use the stroke on a circle thing is because you don't have to plan out or guestimate your angles or rotations, it's all controlled by your dotted line settings under your stroke palette and it's all adjustable on the fly.

 

graymachine: if you are talking to me, feel free...I have no issues with sharing the info.

 

Thanks for the additions guys!

Edited by BOY:1:DER

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Nice! Hey, do you mind if I post this on AE Freemart? I'll credit you with you link and whatever info you want. Let me know.

Me? BOY:1:DER? krpdesign? That weird guy that keep staring at me from across the street?

 

Just in case it is me. I'll be out tonight but I could have a nicer, more complete file ready for you by early afternoon tomorrow.

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Me? BOY:1:DER? krpdesign? That weird guy that keep staring at me from across the street?

 

Just in case it is me. I'll be out tonight but I could have a nicer, more complete file ready for you by early afternoon tomorrow.

 

 

Sorry. yeah.. Hey you with the face!!

 

I'll check back with you tomorrow.

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if you dont need it as external footage you can do it extremly fast and adjustable in AE itself.

 

new solid.

apply blend->jalousine and put it to a value so that the lines are visilble.

apply distort-> polar cordinates , interpolation setting to 100%

done.

you can adjust and keyframe the quantity and thickness of the lines this way!

the black will of course be transparent but you just need to put another solid behind the first solid with the desired color.

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Actually it's not up on your site any more......dead link. But I downloaded it ages ago, I'm like a resource vacuum cleaner. I used it yesterday and thought I would pay you some respects for saving me some time, thanks :)

 

I'd completely forgotten about those.

I wish I had more useful stuff (and stuff that's more useful) to share.

Edited by nextexit

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if you dont need it as external footage you can do it extremly fast and adjustable in AE itself.

 

new solid.

apply blend->jalousine and put it to a value so that the lines are visilble.

apply distort-> polar cordinates , interpolation setting to 100%

done.

you can adjust and keyframe the quantity and thickness of the lines this way!

the black will of course be transparent but you just need to put another solid behind the first solid with the desired color.

 

The all-AE method is great! Some notes & questions:

1) Blend > Jalousine is otherwise known as Transition > Venetian Blinds

2) Make sure your type of conversion setting (for Polar Coordinates) is set as "Rect to Polar"

3) By tweaking out your Venetian Blinds settings, you can also generate spirals!

4) My polar coordinates interpolation ends up quite jagged. I've all my settings to best/full resolution, et cetera, and it's still easy to see the jaggies. How do you maintain hard edges and get rid of the aliasing from the polar coordinates?

 

 

Any other methods of creating this effect self-contained within AE? Last time I needed something similar this was my method:

1) Create a single path in Illustrator. Make sure it's absolutely straight and vertical. Align it to the center of your artboard.

2) With the path selected, double-click your rotate tool in the toolbox to open Rotate dialogue box. Enter a divisor of 360 and hit "Copy."

3) Use the duplicate command (Ctrl-D for PC) repeatedly in order to complete the circle. (Hint: the number of times required will also be a divisor of 360.)

4) Select all your paths, copy, paste onto a layer in AE. This should give you a mask for each path you created in Illustrator.

5) Apply Effect > Generate > Stroke to the same layer your paths were pasted to.

6) Ensure that the "All Masks" check box is checked, and that "Stroke Sequentially" is not.

7) Adjust your stroke settings as required to achieve the desired look.

 

There are a few nice things about this method, including the mathematical precision and cleanliness of the end result, however, I'd like another way which doesn't require me to use an external program at all. The method outlined by Todoke is nice (with the exception of the jaggies!) because the ray width is easily adjustable and is evenly spaced, and also it doesn't require the use of Illustrator. Can a compromise be found?!? ;):D

 

EDIT: Forgot to note that I didn't need the center to diminish for my method, and I was only using it to create radial marks around a center axis. The stroke width will remain constant to the center for my method.

Edited by caltd

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I usually draw out one "ray", create a null with a slider, and then use a rotation expression based on index and the slider value:

 

n = *SLIDER VALUE FROM NULL*;

index * n

 

Then just duplicate duplicate duplicate.

 

Which is coincidentally the same way it is done in the AE Expressions series.. but hey, I thought I'd throw it out there.

Edited by graymachine

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AWESOME!

Works great

Thanks!

 

 

Since this style seems to pop up all the time, I thought I would share a way to build these SUPER fast.

 

1.) Open Illustrator

2.) Create a circle

3.) Apply a dotted line to the circle

4.) Set the stroke width to something really high, like 150 or 240

5.) Mess around with dotted line width, the gap in between the dotted lines, circle scale, etc.

6.) When you have it just right, go under the Object menu to Flatten Transparency

7.) Default settings are just fine, so just hit OK

8.) Ungroup the group and delete the empty circle that is still there

9.) Enjoy your rays!

 

Well, there you have it folks...it doesn't get much easier than that...unless someone has already created a chinese rays plugin...by trapcode.

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here's how i do it (in illustrator):

 

1. select the "star tool".

2. click your art area

3. set how many rays you want (even number)

4. set your radius 1 to something

5. set your radius 2 to 0

6. now make a circle no larger than your radius 1 of the star

7. select both

8. align to the center of both objects (horizontal and vertical)

9. use pathfinder to divide

10. use the direct selection tool to select and delete every other ray

11. save your file

12. enjoy

 

usually once you make one or two and save the file you shouldn't ever have to make another one but it's easy enough to remake if you have to.

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